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eBook Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England download

by Barbara Yorke

eBook Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England download ISBN: 1852640278
Author: Barbara Yorke
Publisher: Trafalgar Square (October 1, 1990)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1122 kb
Fb2: 1454 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw mbr doc lit
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England. 13 MB·3 Downloads·New!

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Home Browse Books Book details, Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England

Home Browse Books Book details, Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England. Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England. The first chapter is also a general one and deals with the difficult issue of Anglo-Saxon kingship before 600 and introduces the main classes of written record.

Anglo-Saxon England (Oxford History of England).

Kings and Kingdoms of early. To the several generations of King Alfred’s College History students who have explored kings and kingdoms in early Anglo-Saxon England with me. First published 1990 by . No part of this book may be reprinted or reproduced or utilised in any form or by any electronic, mechanical, or other means, now known or hereafter invented, including photocopying and recording, or in any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing. British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data.

British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data Yorke, Barbara 1951–Kings and Kingdoms of early Anglo-Saxon .

British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data Yorke, Barbara 1951–Kings and Kingdoms of early Anglo-Saxon England. Written sources: British Written sources: Anglo-Saxon Archaeological evidence The political structure of Anglo-Saxon England c. 600 The nature of early Anglo-Saxon kingship Sources for the study of kings and kingdoms from the seventh to the ninth centuries II. KENT.

Start by marking Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England as Want to Read . Though it's getting a bit old now, this is still the best survey of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms prior to the unification of England under Alfred and his successors that I know.

Start by marking Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Each of the major kingdoms (Wessex, Mercia, Northumbria, etc) gets its own chapter, outlining what we know, giving a regnal list as best as can be determined (and explaining the problems in doing so), and discussing developments within that area.

Barbara Yorke is a Senior Lecturer in History and Archaeology, King Alfred's College, Winchester.

Sixteen genealogical and regnal tables help to elucidate the history of the royal houses. Barbara Yorke is a Senior Lecturer in History and Archaeology, King Alfred's College, Winchester.

This study surveys the history of the six best-recorded Anglo-Saxon kingdoms within the period 600-900 Ad: Kent, the East Saxons, the East Angles, Northumbria, Mercia and Wessex. The chapters, like many of the available written sources, approach the histories of the individual kingdoms through that of their royal families. Dynastic history is a major concern of the book, but the intention is to go beyond narrative accounts of the various royal houses to try to explain issues such as strategies of rulership, the reasons for success on failure and the dynamics of change to the office of king. More generalised conclusions suggest themselves from the studies of individual kingdoms and these are brought together in the final chapter which examines four main facets in the development of kingship in the period under review: kingship and overlordship royal resources; royal and noble families; and king and church. The first chapter is also a general one and deals with the difficult issue of Anglo-Saxon kingship before 600 and introduces the main classes of written record.
Comments: (2)
Brakree
Barbara Yorke has written a nice summation of the current state of research into the origins of six of the seven kingdoms of the Heptarchy, the classic seven-kingdom division of England (defined as the land held by the Anglo-Saxons) in the Sixth through Eighth Centuries (the seventh, Sussex, is even more poorly documented than the others, and she treats it in the sections on Kent and Wessex). There are various ways to approach the king lists for this period, and Yorke is somewhat of a minimalist, preferring not to list rulers who cannot be attested by relatively reliable sources (and for early Anglo-Saxon England, "relatively reliable" is itself a relative term), so her lists do not include some rulers mentioned in that reliable old stand-by, the "Handbook of British Chronology." She also includes useful notes on what little is known about some of the less-known groups which may have been sub-kingdoms with brief flashes of autonomy, like Lindsey, Wight, the Hwicce, Middle Angles and Maegonsaeten, and Elmet.

Most interesting to me was her careful reconstruction of the political trajectory of Kent, suggesting that instead of being a single state, it may have been for much of its history divided into two kingdoms, East Kent and West Kent, the latter at times including Sussex, and that many of the kings listed. whose chronology has been so debateable, may in fact have ruled concurrently in its two halves.

This is a useful addition to the library of anyone interested in Anglo-Saxon England or the "Dark Ages," and a nice guide to the period that fascinated J.R.R. Tolkien and from which he drew much of Middle Earth.
Landaron
I was very impressed by this book which is both very readable and scholarly. I like in particular how the History of each Anglo-Saxon kingdom was dealt with differently. I have greatly enjoyed this book and the only thing that stops me from giving it 5 stars is a personal preference. I would have rather there had been a more in depth analysis of the early history of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. However, if you are interested in Anglo-Saxon history, particularly of the individual kingdoms, then this book is what you should buy