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eBook The Church of England and Christian Antiquity: The Construction of a Confessional Identity in the 17th Century (Oxford-Warburg Studies) download

by Jean-Louis Quantin

eBook The Church of England and Christian Antiquity: The Construction of a Confessional Identity in the 17th Century (Oxford-Warburg Studies) download ISBN: 0199557861
Author: Jean-Louis Quantin
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (April 25, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 496
ePub: 1648 kb
Fb2: 1166 kb
Rating: 4.5
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Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Jean-Louis Quantin was born on 20 August 1967 and studied at the Ecole Normale Supérieure and the Sorbonne in Paris (. hil 1994; Habilitation 2003)

Jean-Louis Quantin was born on 20 August 1967 and studied at the Ecole Normale Supérieure and the Sorbonne in Paris (. hil 1994; Habilitation 2003).

Jean-Louis Quantin shows how, between the Reformation and the last years of the Restoration, the rationale behind the Church of England's reliance on the Fathers as authorities on doctrinal controversies, changed significantly. Elizabethan divines, exactly like their Reformed counterparts on the Continent, used the Church Fathers to vindicate the Reformation from Roman Catholic charges of novelty, but firmly rejected the authority of tradition. They stressed that, on all questions controverted, there was simply no consensus of the Fathers.

In the 17th century, the Puritan and Presbyterian factions continued to challenge the leadership of the .

In the 17th century, the Puritan and Presbyterian factions continued to challenge the leadership of the Church which under the Stuarts veered towards a more catholic interpretation of the Elizabethan Settlement especially under Archbishop Laud and the rise of the concept of Anglicanism as the via media. After the victory of the Parliamentarians the Prayer Book was abolished and the Presbyterian and Independent factions dominated. The Episcopacy was abolished. The Restoration restored the Church of England, episcopacy and the Prayer Book

Jean-Louis Quantin’s thoroughly erudite book develops from recent historiography in the history of patristic .

Jean-Louis Quantin’s thoroughly erudite book develops from recent historiography in the history of patristic scholarship. It critiques, and effectively corrects, a problematic, confessional view of Church of England identities regarding the role allotted to the early church.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009 978 0 19 955786 8 The Church of England and Christian antiquity. The Christian monitors.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. 85. 978 0 19 955786 8 The Church of England and Christian antiquity. The construction of a confessional identity in the 17th century. By QuantinJean-Louis. The Church of England and the age of benevolence, 1680–1730. The Lewis Walpole Series in Eighteenth-Century Culture and History. Pp. x + 360. New Haven–London: Yale University Press, 2014. 978 0 19 955786 8. Justin Champion (a1). Royal Holloway, University of London. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 04 March 2011.

This splendid study is part of the admirable Oxford-Warburg Studies series dedicated to the history of scholarship, under . covers the period from Thomas Cranmer into the early 18th century

covers the period from Thomas Cranmer into the early 18th century. The work is built upon a monumental foundation of bibliographical scholarship and, along the way, it makes telling contributions to our knowledge of that field.

Поставляется из: Англии Описание: Jean-Louis Quantin shows how the appeal to Christian antiquity played a key role in the construction of a new confessional identity, Anglicanism, maintaining that theologians of the Church of England came to consider that their Church.

Поставляется из: Англии Описание: Jean-Louis Quantin shows how the appeal to Christian antiquity played a key role in the construction of a new confessional identity, Anglicanism, maintaining that theologians of the Church of England came to consider that their Church occupied a unique position, because it alone was faithful to the beliefs and practices of the Church Fathers.

Jean-Louis Quantin shows how the appeal to Christian antiquity played a key role in the construction of a new confessional identity, 'Anglicanism', maintaining that theologians of the Church of England came to consider that their Church occupied a unique position, because it alone wa. .

Jean-Louis Quantin shows how the appeal to Christian antiquity played a key role in the construction of a new confessional identity, 'Anglicanism', maintaining that theologians of the Church of England came to consider that their Church occupied a unique position, because it alone was fait.

Today, the statement that Anglicans are fond of the Fathers and keen on patristic studies looks like a platitude. Like many platitudes, it is much less obvious than one might think. Indeed, it has a long and complex history. Jean-Louis Quantin shows how, between the Reformation and the last years of the Restoration, the rationale behind the Church of England's reliance on the Fathers as authorities on doctrinal controversies, changed significantly. Elizabethan divines, exactly like their Reformed counterparts on the Continent, used the Church Fathers to vindicate the Reformation from Roman Catholic charges of novelty, but firmly rejected the authority of tradition. They stressed that, on all questions controverted, there was simply no consensus of the Fathers. Beginning with the "avant-garde conformists" of early Stuart England, the reference to antiquity became more and more prominent in the construction of a new confessional identity, in contradistinction both to Rome and to Continental Protestants, which, by 1680, may fairly be called "Anglican." English divines now gave to patristics the very highest of missions. In that late age of Christianity--so the idea ran--now that charisms had been withdrawn and miracles had ceased, the exploration of ancient texts was the only reliable route to truth. As the identity of the Church of England was thus redefined, its past was reinvented. This appeal to the Fathers boosted the self-confidence of the English clergy and helped them to surmount the crises of the 1650s and 1680s. But it also undermined the orthodoxy that it was supposed to support.