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eBook Medieval England: From Hastings to Bosworth (Revealing History (Paperback)) download

by Edmund King

eBook Medieval England: From Hastings to Bosworth (Revealing History (Paperback)) download ISBN: 0752429795
Author: Edmund King
Publisher: Tempus (December 1, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1357 kb
Fb2: 1146 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: txt mobi azw docx
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Medieval England book.

Medieval England book. Start by marking Medieval England: From Hastings to Bosworth as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Medieval England presents a broad panorama of the political and cultural development of English society from the Norman Conquest to the end of the Wars of the . has been added to your Cart.

Medieval England presents a broad panorama of the political and cultural development of English society from the Norman Conquest to the end of the Wars of the Roses. It is a story of change has been added to your Cart.

Tell us if something is incorrect. Medieval England : From Hastings to Bosworth. Electrode, App-product, Comp-456284497, DC-prod-cdc02, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-29.

My books about medieval life and medicine and my online courses are very popular visit ww. onimount. com for more details. ng Plantagenet rule and ushering in the Tudor dynasty. Planning permission has been granted to Horiba Mira to build a car test track across part of the registered battlefield site, destroying not only archaeology and the landscape.

Discover 9 important medieval battles here . It is more than 600 years since Henry V led England to victory at the battle of Agincourt on 25 October 1415, defeating a French army significantly bigger than his own. But despite deservedly being one of the most famous battles of the Middle Ages, Agincourt is not necessarily one of the most significant of the era, argues medieval warfare expert Dr Sean McGlynn.

Coauthors & Alternates.

Medieval England, 1066-1485. Coauthors & Alternates.

In our telling of the story of England, the medieval period is the time between William the Conqueror's victory at. .

In our telling of the story of England, the medieval period is the time between William the Conqueror's victory at Hastings in 1066 and Richard III's defeat at Bosworth in 1485. William I seated on his throne, depicted in the late 12th-century Battle Chronicle, written by the monks of Battle Abbey.

Best introduction to medieval history. Until now there has been no short history of England covering all significant events, themes and individuals: this bestselling book, published in association with the National Trust, will be the standard work for years to come. By Marcus on 08-04-13.

It covers the 17-year period from 1685 to 1702, encompassing the reign of James II, the Glorious Revolution, the coregency of William III and Mary II, and up to William III's death.

Moreover, the future King of England, Henry V, finally suppressed the revolt led by the . In 1509 Henry VIII became king of England.

Moreover, the future King of England, Henry V, finally suppressed the revolt led by the Welsh Prince Owain Glyndŵr (1412). This event marked the end of the great Welsh rebellions against the English rule. The War of the Two Roses ended at the Battle of Bosworth Field (1485) with the victory of Henry Tudor, who ascended the throne with the name of Henry VII. During his reign, two new pretenders to the throne came forward: the first, Lambert Simnel, was defeated at the Battle of Stoke Field, while the second, Perkin Warbeck, was executed in 1499.

Medieval England presents the political and cultural development of English society from the Norman Conquest to the end of the Wars of the Roses. It is a story of change, progress, setback, and consolidation, with England emerging as a wealthy and stable country, many of whose essential features were to remain unchanged until the Industrial Revolution. Edmund King traces his chronicle through the lives of successive monarchs, the inescapable central thread of that epoch. The momentous events of the times are also recreated, from the compiling of the Domesday Book, through the wars with the Scots, the Welsh, and the French, to the Peasants' Revolt and the disastrous Black Death.
Comments: (2)
Abywis
Some periods and places in history are more interesting than others; it just depends on your interests. With American history, I enjoy reading about the Revolutionary era, but I'm not as much into the Civil War. With others, it could be the reverse. When it comes to English history, I find the more modern period tedious, but I enjoy reading about the early monarchy, especially from William the Conqueror to Elizabeth. This time span was mostly in the Middle Age times which Edmund King covers in his book, Medieval England, which covers the period from William's conquest of England to the conclusion of the War of the Roses, a timespan of roughly 400 years.

Superficially, this seems like a rather adventurous era filled with larger than life characters. This is the time of the heroic Richard the Lion Heart and Henry V as well as the villainous King John and Richard III. It was the era that produced the real life Braveheart, William Wallace as well as the legendary Robin Hood, a period that Shakespeare would write ten plays about (King John, Edward III (which Shakespeare co-wrote), Richard II, Henry IV Parts One and Two, Henry V, Henry VI Parts One to Three and Richard III). Of course, in reality, medieval England was a more complicated place.

Edmund King's provides a more realistic look of the period in his brief (less than 300 pages) book. No person is simply good or evil, though some are definitely more brilliant than others. Even the more successful monarchs, such as Henry II and Edward I, had their problems. King presents the early English epoch as one in constant flux but definitely evolving from a feudal society of royalty and nobles to the beginnings of a more modern England with king (or queen) and Parliament.

King's writing is always informative, but not always interesting. He's not a bad writer, but stylistically, he is sometimes a bit tiring. There are, however, some nice illustrations, so I'll push it up from a high three stars to a low four. Although King knows his stuff and this is probably the best book I've read on this period, I still think there are better ones out there; I just haven't found them yet.
Moonshaper
This text is a bit strong on the central narrative, but I really enjoyed reading of the broad panorama, political and cultural development of the English Society from the Norman Conquest to the end of the Wars of the Roses. It is the story of change, progress, setbacks and consolidation, with England emerging as a wealthy and stable country, many of whose essential features were to remain unchanged until the Industrial
Revolution.
Within the framework of the book "King" examines many other facets of medieval England, including religion and learning, agriculture and economic developments, the machinery of government, the administration of justice, warfare and chivalry, everyday life, art and architecture.
A very fine book....