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eBook The Embarrassment of Riches: An Interpretation of Dutch Culture in the Golden Age download

by Simon Schama

eBook The Embarrassment of Riches: An Interpretation of Dutch Culture in the Golden Age download ISBN: 0520061470
Author: Simon Schama
Publisher: University of California Press; 1st edition (September 1, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 711
ePub: 1673 kb
Fb2: 1746 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mobi txt lrf doc
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

The Embarrassment of Riches: an interpretation of Dutch culture in the Golden Age is a book by the historian Simon Schama. It was published in 1987.

The Embarrassment of Riches: an interpretation of Dutch culture in the Golden Age is a book by the historian Simon Schama. The book sold quite well and led to an immediate second printing only a few months after its release.

Simon Schama's magesterial new book encompasses over 1,500 years of Britain's history, from the first Roman . Like his The Embarrassment of Riches and the bestselling Citizens, Simon Schama's latest book is both history and literature of immense stylishness and ambition.

Simon Schama's magesterial new book encompasses over 1,500 years of Britain's history, from the first Roman invasions to the early seventeenth century, and the extraordinary reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Schama, the author of the highly acclaimed Citizens a. Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution. But Dead Certainties goes beyond these more conventional histories to address the deeper enig. The Story of the Jews: Finding the Words, 1000 BCE – 1492 CE.

The Embarrassment of Riches book. This is a really fun book that explores the Golden Age of the Netherlands (predominantly the 17th century) and its culture - as someone else here put it neatly, it's a book about how the Dutch became Dutch. I wish I had more time to spend reading this work because it's a treasure trove of fascinating information.

In some ways Schama's massive tone on the Dutch Golden Age feels like a university textbook, a work perhaps . Considering the book was written in the late 1980s, it still feels and reads with relevancy.

Considering the book was written in the late 1980s, it still feels and reads with relevancy. Schama's style is definitely scholarly but also personal.

Schama, Simon, 1945-. Netherlands - Civilization - 17th century. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on January 31, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). It was published in 1987, five years after the bicentenary of the Dutch recognition of the young United States

The Embarrassment of Riches: An interpretation of Dutch culture in the Golden Age is a book by the historian Simon Schama. It was published in 1987, five years after the bicentenary of the Dutch recognition of the young United States. It was initially well received and did so well, it was translated into Dutch (Dutch title: Overvloed en Onbehagen:De Nederlandse cultuur in de Gouden Eeuw) and published there in 1988, where it was also well received

Schama explores the mysterious contradictions of the Dutch nation that invented . Simon Schama is an historian, educator, and writer.

Schama explores the mysterious contradictions of the Dutch nation that invented itself from the ground up, attained an unprecedented level of affluence, and lived in constant dread of being corrupted by happiness. He was born in London, England on February 13, 1945. in history in 1966 from Cambridge University and later became a fellow of Christ College. Schama's 1977 book, Patriots and Liberators: Revolution in the Netherlands, 1780-1813, received the Wolfson Prize for history and the Leo Gershoy Memorial Prize of the American History Association. Drawing on a vast array of period documents and sumptuously reproduced art, Schama re-creates in precise detail a nation's mental state. He tells of bloody uprisings and beached whales, of the cult of hygiene and the plague of tobacco, of thrifty housewives and profligate tulip-speculators.

The Embarrassment of Riches. An interpretation of Dutch Culture n the Golden Age. chama

The Embarrassment of Riches. chama. The book gives no guidance whatsoever, it is no traditional history, focusing on political structures and dramatic events, its mission is something entirely dierent, to evoke a culture, to put everyday life in the foreground, to make us identify with people and customs of the past. Anyway the Reformation did, if it did anything at all, bring the Bible to the people, and with that its grand gripping stories.

Schama does an excellent job of explaining the psychology of the Netherlands at that time, often using contemporary graphic art as the key to unlock the minds of the Dutch. hugh ashton, October 12, 2010.

Describes the cultural and social milieu of seventeenth-century Holland, where, despite great material wealth and general prosperity, an "anxiety of superabundance" permeated all aspects of the culture
Comments: (7)
Brakree
Halfway through now, and it is hard to put down (except for those passages where the author does seem to take along time to get over dwelling on some particular (art) pieces to put in context). Having said that, the very same thing that makes it so intriguing and interesting, that is being able to explain context and add nuance before trying to draw a conclusion, can make it a challenge to get thru, at times. If you stick with it though the insight that's gained is uniquely valuable, and changes your view on history, if you had already formed some (for some reason, i.e. by roots, like me), forever. The most surprising aspect of reading though, when you're native, or somehow have a connection with the subject already (i.e. by birth, descent, etc.), is that many traits in the attitudes, culture are recognizable, as in still present today.

In other words; what Schama is giving us is a time travel that allows one to understand how the particulars of a people, country, culture, came into being, and in that way you learn about yourself (if applicable), or your friend, your colleague, your ancestry, etc., (fill in as applicable). Schama does presuppose a certain amount of historic knowledge though, by way of making references that will be totally lost on you if you don't possess that. And he's not filling in, nor repeating, all the historic conflicts, details, etc., (in all honesty, it would need to send me back to 'history class'); that's not what the book is about; it is focusing and refocusing on the general attitudes and popular sentiments that prevailed time and again in the Netherlands through the 17th century. Schama does so with his uncanny talent to portray times as if you live in them, to bring them back to life, with the help of detail, art, and his hard to match talent for story-telling.
Oveley
This is a little heavy going, lots and lots of detail. I enjoyed it but did skim some sections. Maybe that's the key, read the parts you want and skip the rest. The book is so long and thorough that you'll still get your money's worth.
Balladolbine
Simon Schama - - no matter what his subject - - is worth every second spent with him. This book is endlessly fascinating, and I learned things I'd never heard about (and I'm Dutch!). He gave me new insight into the great paintings and the incredibly rich life of the Dutch golden age, and I'm recommending this book to everyone with a love of art, history, culture - - or simply great writing. Buy it!! You'll be riveted and enchanted.
Dordred
This book is certainly not for everyone. I would describe it as a mountain climb. I myself found myself slugging towards the summit in certain chapters simply to get further along into the sections that held more of my interest. In some ways Schama's massive tone on the Dutch Golden Age feels like a university textbook, a work perhaps best appreciated by scholars and students; on the other hand there is some vital and intriguing research going on here, making the ascent fulfilling.

Considering the book was written in the late 1980s, it still feels and reads with relevancy. Schama's style is definitely scholarly but also personal. Imagine traveling through the seventeenth century history of The Netherlands with a tour guide that is both passionate and knowledgeable, someone eager to share his research but also equally eager to draw you in with facts that are esoteric and sometimes strange - the drowning cell in a reform prison, beached whales, the symbolism of pipes, oysters and blowing bubbles in Dutch household art. Overall, it's still a fascinating trip.

While visiting Holland this past spring, the Dutch are always reminding tourists that Amsterdam isn't The Netherlands. After reading Schama, I have to disagree. The Dutch are famous for their tolerance, innovation, art and science. And though this book doesn't specifically highlight any city (Amsterdam being the most famous and exemplifying the forward-thinking ideals of Dutch society), it provides an excellent in-depth look at a time when the Dutch became the 'Dutch', carving out their identity while defending themselves against the Spanish, French and English.

The book is divided four parts: Becoming, Doing and Not Doing, Living and Growing and Watersheds. Schama navigates the aspects of Dutch culture with ease as chapters seamlessly flow into each other. From discussions on the influence of Bible scripture on Patriotic fervor (the Dutch saw their territory as a kind of new Jerusalem) to the Calvinist zeal of cleanliness, there are excellent discussions here highlighted by looking at works of art and lithographs of the time as well as quoting from the writers and polemicists of the day.

What I came with is how much the people of The Netherlands appreciated and loved their children. Before Dr.Spock, the Dutch were very aware of the beauty and innocence of childhood and nurtured it in their families. This and the fact that the Dutch believed in friendship in marriage, that a love based in companionship and harmony was far more successful that unions forged in finance (though I'm sure this occurred as well).

I also loved the section on the mid-wife's role in Dutch society as well as the drinking and smoking habits of the rich and poor. A massive book but so rich I'm sure most readers will return to certain chapters just to revisit the interesting facts and discussions. And considering there is so much here, it's no wonder Schama's book is still in publication. A heavy one, a times a bit of a struggle but to quote Spinoza, a resident of Amsterdam in the Golden Age: "All things excellent are as difficult as they are rare."
Whitebinder
This text is complex. Good for a graduate student comfortable with dense material and prepared with background knowledge, not so great for a casual tourist seeking to get ready for a trip.
Bladecliff
I like it very much, but then I like everything written by Simon Shama. It is both a historical book and about capitalism and helps to understand not only the Netherlands in the 17th. Century but also modern capitalism.