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eBook Image and Power in the Archaeology of Early Medieval Britain: Essays in honour of Rosemary Cramp download

by Helena Hamerow,Arthur MacGregor

eBook Image and Power in the Archaeology of Early Medieval Britain: Essays in honour of Rosemary Cramp download ISBN: 1842170511
Author: Helena Hamerow,Arthur MacGregor
Publisher: Oxbow Books (July 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1107 kb
Fb2: 1429 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: docx doc rtf txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Rosemary Cramp's influence on the archaeology of early Medieval Britain is nowhere more apparent than in these essays in her honour by her former students.

Rosemary Cramp's influence on the archaeology of early Medieval Britain is nowhere more apparent than in these essays in her honour by her former students

Rosemary Cramp's influence on the archaeology of early Medieval Britain is nowhere more apparent than in these essays in her honour by her former students.

Rosemary Cramp's influence on the archaeology of early Medieval Britain is nowhere more apparent than in these essays in her honour by her former students

Helena Francisca Hamerow, FSA (born 18 September 1961) is Professor of Early Medieval Archaeology and former Head of the School of Archaeology at Oxford University

Helena Francisca Hamerow, FSA (born 18 September 1961) is Professor of Early Medieval Archaeology and former Head of the School of Archaeology at Oxford University. She is the author of numerous books and academic articles on archaeology and early medieval history. Hamerow obtained a BA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a DPhil from Oxford.

Rosemary Cramp's influence on the archaeology of early Medieval Britain is nowhere more apparent than in these . Richard Bailey, Christopher Morris and Derek Craig top and tail the book with tributes to Rosemary Cramp and a bibliography of her work.

Rosemary Cramp's influence on the archaeology of early Medieval Britain is nowhere more apparent than in these essays in her honour by her former students.

Helena Hamerow and Arthur MacGregor. It was a great privilege for me to be asked to give the opening address at the conference in honour of Rosemary Cramp -but also a frightening experience. On 23-24 April 1999 some two hundred friends, colleagues and former students – including many pleased to count themselves under more than one of those headings – gathered in Durham to celebrate the seventieth birthday of their doyenne, Professor Rosemary Cramp. We were there to wish her well as she approached her seventieth birthday, but also to celebrate her achievements.

Rosemary Cramp's influence on the archaeology of early Medieval Britain is nowhere more apparent than in these essays in her honour by her former students

Helena Hamerow, Arthur MacGregor. Rosemary Cramp's influence on the archaeology of early Medieval Britain is nowhere more apparent than in these essays in her honour by her former students.

Helena Hamerow, Arthur MacGregor.

Dame Rosemary Jean Cramp, DBE, FSA, FBA (born 6 May 1929) is a British archaeologist and academic specialising in the Anglo-Saxons. She was the first female professor appointed at Durham University and was Professor of Archaeology from 1971 to 1990. She served as President of the Society of Antiquaries of London from 2001 to 2004. 1929-05-06) 6 May 1929 (age 90). Nationality.

Rosemary Cramp's influence on the archaeology of early Medieval Britain is nowhere more apparent than in these essays in her honour by her former students

Rosemary Cramp's influence on the archaeology of early Medieval Britain is nowhere more apparent than in these essays in her honour by her former students. Monastic sites, Lindisfarne and Whithorn, are the inspiration for Deirdre O'Sullivan's and Peter Hill's papers; Chris Loveluck discusses the implications of the findings from the newly-discovered settlement at Flixborough in Lincolnshire; Nancy Edwards describes the early monumental sculpture from St David's in South Wales; Martin Carver reviews the politics of monumental sculpture and monumentality; and Catherine Hills reassesses the significance of imported ivory found in graves. Richard Bailey, Christopher Morris and Derek Craig top and tail the book with tributes to Rosemary Cramp and a bibliography of her work.