carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Our Man in Camelot

eBook Our Man in Camelot download

by Anthony Price

eBook Our Man in Camelot download ISBN: 0708821898
Author: Anthony Price
Publisher: Futura; New Ed edition (1982)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1254 kb
Fb2: 1932 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: doc lrf lit lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Our Man in Camelot is one of Anthony Price's cold war espionage novels, all of which have some connection to (much older) history or archaeology. This one is populated by academics and amateurs who are, or become, caught up in Arthurian legend or history (as Price himself clearly i.

Our Man in Camelot is one of Anthony Price's cold war espionage novels, all of which have some connection to (much older) history or archaeology. This is a actually a good book to explain to the novice reader the essential historical details of Arthurian Britain (. 00). It also features a romance between two of the main characters, and there are self-conscious Arthurian resonances in the roles some of the characters adopt.

shorter, looked as though he owned Audley. Mosby’s eyes strayed back for a second to the coat-of-arms, which was held aloft by two winged dragons breathing heraldic fire. So that made four dragons all told, he reckoned dispassionately. Four dragons versus one dentist. Roskill appeared at his shoulder. Even Sir Lancelot might have baulked at those odds

Our Man In Camelot book. Anthony Price includes so many in sights that I have to Google them to prove they are true. Who knew the CIA sank 80 double decker buses in the Thames in 1964

Our Man In Camelot book. Who knew the CIA sank 80 double decker buses in the Thames in 1964. I don't want to give any of the plot but the use Camelot and King Arthur at one point felt like I was living the Brexit nightmare and it began in the 1970s. May 13, 2019 Jorn Barger rated it it was ok. Preposterous, in Price's patented way. An extremely fragile chess puzzle built of abstractions. CIA actors who fool Audley on his home turf?!?

Our Man in Camelot (1975) UK; (1976) US. War Game (1976) UK; (1977) US. The '44 Vintage (1978).

For other people named Anthony Price, see Anthony Price (disambiguation). John Allan Anthony Price (1928-08-16)16 August 1928 Rickmansworth Hertfordshire, England. These books focus on a group of agents who work for an organization loosely based on the real MI5. Price died in Blackheath, London from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on 30 May 2019, at the age of 9. .Our Man in Camelot (1975) UK; (1976) US.

Anthony Price - Our man in camelot. Anthony Price - Our man in camelot. Prologue: Captain Finsterwald and AIC Merriwether. A friend of mine in Cambridge tells me that there is a particularly acute essay on Badon by the late Professor Bullitt in the 1935 volume of the Transactions of the Cambrian Archaeological Society. That makes us a SOU, which the book says is a reaction pattern to early warning of a KGB clandestine action. And what little you've actually admitted so far confirms that-plus what you haven't actually denied. Okay-so what?' 'Harry-' Merriwether spread his hands '-so this is probably the first letter Barkham ever wrote to him. If he called in every week, and paid cash for what he bought, there wouldn't be any need to write to each other. That piece of paper you're holding tells me how. Because there's not one of the books on that list in this house but those five bird books-' He thrust four chocolate fingers and a chocolate thumb at Finsterwald.

Price, Anthony - Our man in Camelot. Air Force plane mysteriously vanishes, on a flight from its base in Britain, and its ace pilot with it. The CIA investigates the missing pilot, and makes some odd findings.

Author: Anthony Price. Genre: Antique literature. Read a fragment illustrations

Author: Anthony Price. Read a fragment illustrations. With letter-bombs uppermost in his mind he froze where.

By the CWA Gold Dagger award-winning author of Other Paths to Glory Anthony Price ingeniously combines the machinations. With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

Paperback
Comments: (5)
Delagamand
Although dated, Price's series of espionage novels remain a joy to read. In many ways, I find his work to at least equal (and perhaps surpass) Le Carre's books. There are multiple currents in his characters; in fact, much of the pleasure in his books lies in the depth of characterization rather than the plot itself. Well worth reading.
Soustil
A little convoluted, but enjoyable, particularly if you like history
Billy Granson
Our Man in Camelot is one of Anthony Price's cold war espionage novels, all of which have some connection to (much older) history or archaeology. This one is populated by academics and amateurs who are, or become, caught up in Arthurian legend or history (as Price himself clearly is.) This is a actually a good book to explain to the novice reader the essential historical details of Arthurian Britain (c.500). It also features a romance between two of the main characters, and there are self-conscious Arthurian resonances in the roles some of the characters adopt. Most of it takes place within a few days, and with a cold-war setting the twists and turns are quite gripping, but seem plausible to me. It hinges on a search for a famous Arthurian locale: Badon, supposedly the site of Arthur's decisive victory over the Anglo-Saxons. I won't spoil the ancient mystery of finding Badon, or how it relates to the cold war, but it was surprisingly satisfying to me. A warning though: it was published in 1975, and very much shows the racist and sexist attitudes prevalent in society at that time.
Liarienen
Unlike the previous review, I have not read all of Price's work, just this one novel. It was in my opinion a wonderful example of the cerebral sort of short novels that seem to have been more plentiful in the 70s than they are nowadays.

The American CIA agents are sympathetic and their struggle to maintain their cover in the face of British intelligence makes it suspenseful, but it's the puzzle about the Arthurian Dark ages and why they meant the death of a couple of Air Force pilots that pulls the reader into the tale.

The women characters aren't central but they are given a fair portrayal, better than many genre authors of the time period did (it was worse in the 50s and 60s though). They're smart, they have feelings. The racism is a bit worse, but more on the part of the characters than the author, as the one black character is minor, but doesn't get killed off at least.

4 stars is a bit high, maybe it's more like 3 1/2 or 3 2/3, but I enjoyed it very much. If it suffers in comparison with the other books in the series, maybe that's only because it's less to the formula - which might be a good thing to some readers!
Jieylau
Anthony Price wrote a highly literate, historically informed, well plotted series of espionage novels focused on an imaginery branch of the British Security Service. However, this is the weakest of the lot. Straying away from the British protagonists he wrote about so sympathetically and honestly in the other books of the series, two American CIA operatives are the center of the plot. They are not portrayed unfairly or in a mean way - there is just not the tone of inner truth about them that resounds so much in his other characters. Somehow the plot seem half hearted as well. If you must skip one of this long series of short novels on the themes of the entanglement of past, present, and future and the meaning of loyalty, this would be the one. If this is your first look for a Price novel do go read the others - they are fine pieces of work.