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eBook The Flower of Empire: An Amazonian Water Lily, The Quest to Make it Bloom, and the World it Created download

by Tatiana Holway

eBook The Flower of Empire: An Amazonian Water Lily, The Quest to Make it Bloom, and the World it Created download ISBN: 0195373898
Author: Tatiana Holway
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (April 9, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 328
ePub: 1734 kb
Fb2: 1997 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lrf docx azw txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

This book kept me transfixed from the first page. The finding of this fabulous flower, the quest to bring it back alive and the desire to present it to the queen and the public!

That may seem a bit of a stretch, but Holway makes a lively case for this botanical colossus. This book kept me transfixed from the first page. The finding of this fabulous flower, the quest to bring it back alive and the desire to present it to the queen and the public! The author has a true gift of storytelling. She brings the reader along with the plant hunters into the wilds of South America.

The British Empire, later 19th century. The finding of this fabulous flower, the quest to bring it back alive and the desire to present it to the queen and the public!

The British Empire, later 19th century. Queen Victoria, the Rosebud of England (The Victoria and Albert Museum, London). The Victoria water lily in cultivation today (Kit Knotts & Victoria-Adventure). The Crystal Palace, erected for the Great Exhibition of 1851 (The Victoria and Albert Museum, London).

The Flower of Empire book. In The Flower of Empire, Tatiana Holway tells the story of this magnificent lily, revealing how it touched nearly every aspect of Victorian life, art, and culture

The Flower of Empire book. In The Flower of Empire, Tatiana Holway tells the story of this magnificent lily, revealing how it touched nearly every aspect of Victorian life, art, and culture. Holway's colorful narrative captures the sensation stirred by Victoria regia in England, particularly the intense race among prominent Britons to be the first to coax the flower to bloom.

In England, a horticultural nation with a mania for gardens and flowers, news of the discovery sparked a race to bring a live specimen back, and to bring it to bloom. In this extraordinary plant, named Victoria regia for the newly crowned queen, the flower-obsessed British had found their beau ideal.

ower created key aspects of the Victorian world. She does a good job of telling the. (albeit not entirely unfamiliar) tale of the European discovery of the gigantic water lily, with its massive blooms and lily pads that could support the weight of a child. But her. argument that the plant contributed to creating a world is largely based on Joseph.

The flower of empire. Dickens scholar Holway has assembled a terrific cast of characters, including the German Robert Schomburgk, hired by the Royal Geographic Society to survey the new colony of British Guiana and discoverer of the flower on the River Berbice in 1837; John Lindley, the botanical authority who classified the find as Victoria regia; and Sir Joseph Banks, the force behind the Royal Botanic Gardens.

In 1837, a German naturalist named Robert Schomburgk was charting the South American terrirtory of Guiana on behalf of the Royal Geographical Society. The flowers were dazzlingly white; its leaves were.

The Flower of Empire

The Flower of Empire. She charts the discovery and cultivation of the enormous tropical water lily, Victoria regia, from the chance happenings of plant hunting to its immense popularity in Victorian England.

In The Flower of Empire, Tatiana Holwa. more). The histories of the diverse cast of individuals responsible for discovering and cultivating the giant water lily are intricately interwoven with the other topics of the book mentioned above.

In 1837, while charting the Amazonian country of Guiana for Great Britain, German naturalist Robert Schomburgk discovered an astounding "vegetable wonder"--a huge water lily whose leaves were five or six feet across and whose flowers were dazzlingly white. In England, a horticultural nation with a mania for gardens and flowers, news of the discovery sparked a race to bring a live specimen back, and to bring it to bloom. In this extraordinary plant, named Victoria regia for the newly crowned queen, the flower-obsessed British had found their beau ideal. In The Flower of Empire, Tatiana Holway tells the story of this magnificent lily, revealing how it touched nearly every aspect of Victorian life, art, and culture. Holway's colorful narrative captures the sensation stirred by Victoria regia in England, particularly the intense race among prominent Britons to be the first to coax the flower to bloom. We meet the great botanists of the age, from the legendary Sir Joseph Banks, to Sir William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, to the extravagant flower collector the Duke of Devonshire. Perhaps most important was the Duke's remarkable gardener, Joseph Paxton, who rose from garden boy to knight, and whose design of a series of ever-more astonishing glass-houses--one, the Big Stove, had a footprint the size of Grand Central Station--culminated in his design of the architectural wonder of the age, the Crystal Palace. Fittingly, Paxton based his design on a glass-house he had recently built to house Victoria regia. Indeed, the natural ribbing of the lily's leaf inspired the pattern of girders supporting the massive iron-and-glass building. From alligator-laden jungle ponds to the heights of Victorian society, The Flower of Empire unfolds the marvelous odyssey of this wonder of nature in a revealing work of cultural history.
Comments: (7)
White gold
Reading this causes one [me] to explore more literary and graphic sources. Well researched with author Holway giving treatment to individuals & inhstitutions with contributions made to the discoveries, explorations and cultivation of the giant water lily of British Guiana.
fabscf
Great read. Interesting history on its discovery and introduction and cultivation.
Styphe
A beautiful book, beautifully written - well-researched, illuminating & entertaining, to be kept & treasured among one's favorites - with or without a garden of one's own.
Kare
interesting history substantial historic facts presented in an easy to read story
Olwado
I've just started reading this exciting tale of adventure and the pursuit of a horticultural wonder, told by gifted writer, scholar and Victorian literature expert, Tatiana Holway. Through meticulous research, this book is alive with rich, sumptuous details about a passionate obsession that inspired and left its affect on nearly every aspect of the Victorian life, art and culture.

The story revolves around the efforts by an early explorer to map new territory in the Amazon, while simultaneously obtaining plants for private collectors. This led to the surreptitious discovery of a giant water lily, and thanks to well documented diaries and careful research by Holway, this book transports the reader back to an era of exploration and innovation.

Wonderful prose, combined with charming old photographs, The Flower of Empire is a fascinating account that will appeal to gardeners and non-gardeners featuring a cast of colorful, historic characters who weave a remarkable story. A royal tribute to the important role that plants have played throughout history.
The Flower of Empire: An Amazonian Water Lily, The Quest to Make it Bloom, and the World it Created
Tat
The author has written an engaging history of this water lily and the many people and lives it touched along the way, including the technologies it advanced and events it sparked. Well researched, the narrative provides the reader far more knowledge than could ever be expected from the title or the dustjacket. The writing is clear, concise, and peppered with humor. I thought it would simply be a history of a particular plant, but I was so pleased to get much more than I bargained for. An entertaining read for anyone who is interested in either history or plants. A pure delight for gardeners and historic plant lovers.
Mr_Mole
This book kept me transfixed from the first page. The finding of this fabulous flower, the quest to bring it back alive and the desire to present it to the queen and the public! The author has a true gift of storytelling. She brings the reader along with the plant hunters into the wilds of South America. I loved this book so much, that I have been recommending it to nearly anyone who will listen to me.
This book will take you on an amazing journey - a historical, geographical, architectural, and especially, a botanical trip from the wilds of South America to the urbane city of London and the expanding gardens of Great Britain. Not only will it keep you entertained, but Flower of Empire will make you want to further explore this intriguing era which has so many connections to life in the 21st century.