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by Saint Bede,A. M. Sellar

eBook Bede's Ecclesiastical History Of England (1907) download ISBN: 1436786533
Author: Saint Bede,A. M. Sellar
Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (June 29, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 484
ePub: 1415 kb
Fb2: 1821 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr azw docx mobi
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Book 5. Bede's ecclesiastical history of england. Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England By A. M. Sellar.

Book 5. A revised translation with introduction, life, and notes.

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The Ecclesiastical History of the English People (Latin: Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum), written by the Venerable Bede in about AD 731, is a history of the Christian Churches in England, and of England generally; its main focus is on the co. .

The Ecclesiastical History of the English People (Latin: Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum), written by the Venerable Bede in about AD 731, is a history of the Christian Churches in England, and of England generally; its main focus is on the conflict between the pre-Schism Roman Rite and Celtic Christianity.

Start of the project gutenberg ebook bede's ecclesiastical history . Late Vice-Principal of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford.

Start of the project gutenberg ebook bede's ecclesiastical history of england . A Revised Translation. With Introduction, Life, and Notes. George Bell and Sons.

Few lives afford less material for the biographer than Bede’s; few seem to possess a more irresistible fascination. Often as the simple story has been told, the desire to tell it afresh appears to be perennial.

The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation. Book V. I. How Ethelwald, successor to Cuthbert, leading a hermit’s life, calmed a tempest by his prayers. II. How Bishop John cured a dumb man by his blessing. Book I. Of the Situation of Britain and Ireland, and of their ancient inhabitants. How Caius Julius Caesar was the first Roman that came into Britain. III. How Claudius, the second of the Romans who came into Britain, brought the islands Orcades.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England (1907). Tell us if something is incorrect.

the Angles (contempo Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England A Revised Translation with Introduction, Life, and Notes By A. Sellar Bede: 672/3 - 26 May 735, also known as Saint Bede, Venerable Bede, and Bede the Venerable (Latin: Beda Venerabilis), was an English monk a. Sellar Bede: 672/3 - 26 May 735, also known as Saint Bede, Venerable Bede, and Bede the Venerable (Latin: Beda Venerabilis), was an English monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom. of Northumbria of the Angles (contemporarily Abbey in Tyne and Wear, England)

Books related to Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England.

Books related to Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England. Bede's The Ecclesiastical History of the English People.

The Ecclesiastical History of the English People (Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum) is a history of the English Church completed by Bede in 771. The work primarily documents the spread of Christianity among the English, from the arrival of S. The work primarily documents the spread of Christianity among the English, from the arrival of St. Augustine to 771, but also provides some secular history where this overlaps church history or provides background to it. The title is sometimes translated as Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation and often referred to in short form as just th.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Comments: (7)
Legionstatic
One of the great writers in early English literature is the monk Bede. He lived from 672 to 735 A.D. in northern England at the monastery of Jarrow. He was a great scholar and author of many works, Ecclesiastical History of the English People being the most famous. It is a primary source for early British history.

The book starts with the Roman invasions by Julius Caesar in the first century B.C. and Claudius in the first century A.D. This part is quickly covered, since Bede's main interest is to chronicle the coming of the Christian faith to the islands of Britain. He presents the first organized missionaries led by Augustine of Canterbury (as he was later known) in the late 500s. Various successes and failings are described as well as the lives of many kings and queens (at this point several different kingdoms existed on the island), some pagan, some converts. Other religious and lay people are also chronicled, including people in Bede's own living memory.

One of the reasons the book is highly regarded is Bede's style and method. Bede has an engaging style--he bubbles over with Christian enthusiasm and knows to throw in stories to illustrate his points about historical figures. His Latin is quite excellent (from what I've read) though I read an English translation. The book is also well-researched, making use of the extensive library at Jarrow and many other eye-witness accounts. Bede is rightly called the Father of English History.

The book is interesting as a view into the past. People led lives of squalor, solitude, and splendor as they do today. Controversies within the church sprang up, mostly around the proper calculation of Easter's date each year. The problem was resolved at the Synod of Whitby in 664, where bishops met together to discuss the matter. It reminded me of the national bishops' conferences that we have today. People are still people, no matter the age in which they live.

Of course, some bits are less familiar to modern readers. Sometimes the names are quite a mouthful ("Ethelbert was son of Irminric, son of Octa, and after his grandfather Oeric, surnamed Oisc, the kings of the Kentish folk are commonly known as Oiscings." p.112) Having wandered over England a bit the past year and a half, the places and the names are a little more familiar, which helps.

The book is easy to read in small sections. Each chapter covers one story or event, so reading a few pages a day or now and then won't be disruptive. I've read it bit by bit over a few months and found it very interesting and very rewarding.

SAMPLE TEXT, wherein the Bishop Germanus volunteers to lead an army against pagans, which seems awfully unclerical, except...

When, after the celebration of Easter, the greater part of the army, fresh from the [baptismal] font, began to take up arms and prepare for war, Germanus offered to be their leader. He picked out the most active, explored the country round about, and observed, in the way by which the enemy was expected, a valley encompassed by hills of moderate height. In that place he drew up his untried troops, himself acting as their general. And now a formidable host of foes drew near, visible, as they approached, to his men lying in ambush. Then, on a sudden, Germanus, bearing the standard, exhorted his men, and bade them all in a loud voice repeat his words. As the enemy advanced in all security, thinking to take them by surprise, the bishops three times cried, "Hallelujah." A universal shout of the same word followed, and the echoes from the surrounding hills gave back the cry on all sides, the enemy was panic-stricken, fearing, not only the neighbouring rocks, but even the very frame of heaven above them; and such was their terror, that their feet were not swift enough to save them. They fled in disorder, casting away their arms, and well satisfied if, even with unprotected bodies, they could escape the danger; many of them, flying headlong in their fear, were engulfed by the river which they had crossed. The Britons, without a blow, inactive spectators of the victory they had gained, beheld their vengeance complete. The scattered spoils were gathered up, and the devout soldiers rejoiced in the success which Heaven had granted them. The prelates thus triumphed over the enemy without bloodshed, and gained a victory by faith, without the aid of human force. [pp.78-79]
EROROHALO
St. Bede's history is in a class by itself among survey's of church activity in any era, let alone the era usually labelled the "dark ages". Bede's musings are anything but "dark", and provide proverbial and archetypal guidance for the historical writer of any age. His observations are an essential recount of a period not altogether too different from our own near future, as the Catholic Church seeks to evangelize the faith among massive numbers of those in our time who proudly proceed as if God did not matter. Bede helps us to understand the marvelous gift that the 7th Century evangelists had in converting in one generation large numbers of people in both Britain and Ireland.
Mightsinger
Bede is Bede - you know what you are getting when you buy it. What I didn't expect was the tiny type size. If I read for more than an hour I have a headache. If your eyes are anything less than perfect I'd pick another version. There any several out there.
Мох
The formatting of this volume is readable. The title of each chapter tends to be nearly as long (in some cases longer) than the chapter itself. There is no Table of Contents, and so it would be hard to page through this ebook or look for specific chapters or passages. But if you're reading it straight through, beginning to end, you'll encounter no significant problems.
Zorve
You really have to be focused to get through it... but it is interesting.
JOGETIME
This is a great church history book if you're interested in the roots of English Christianity, whether it be Anglicanism or Catholicism, as this predates the reformation.
ZEr0
A classic.
This is one of many reprinted books whose original copyright has now expired. Be ready for phrases such as, "for thither he was wont often to retire to pray in private." It can be fun if you get your kicks reading antiquated translations, but if you want a newer translation try D.H. Farmer (1991) or Judith McClure (2009).