carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Scotland and the Abolition of Black Slavery, 1756-1838

eBook Scotland and the Abolition of Black Slavery, 1756-1838 download

by Iain Whyte

eBook Scotland and the Abolition of Black Slavery, 1756-1838 download ISBN: 0748624325
Author: Iain Whyte
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press (June 21, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1762 kb
Fb2: 1788 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw lrf lrf txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Home Browse Books Book details, Scotland and the Abolition of Black Slavery .

Home Browse Books Book details, Scotland and the Abolition of Black Slavery,. Scotland and the Abolition of Black Slavery, 1756-1838. Although much has been written about Scottish involvement in slavery, the contribution of Scots to the abolition of black slavery has not yet been sufficiently recognised. This book starts with a Virginian slave seeking his freedomin Scotland in 1756 and ends with the abolition of the apprenticeship scheme in the West Indian colonies in 1838. Contemporary documents and periodicals reveal a groundswell of revulsion to what was described as the horrible traffik in humans.

in slavery, the contribution of Scots to the abolition of black slavery has not yet been sufficiently recognised. in Scotland in 1756 and ends with the abolition of the apprenticeship scheme in the West Indian colonies in 1838.

Although much has been written about Scottish involvement in slavery, the contribution of Scots to the abolition of black slavery has not yet been sufficiently recognised. This book starts with a Virginian slave seeking his freedom in Scotland in 1756 and ends with the abolition of the apprenticeship scheme in the West Indian colonies in 1838. Contemporary documents and pe Although much has been written about Scottish involvement in slavery, the contribution of Scots to the abolition of black slavery has not yet been sufficiently recognised.

Whyte, Iain Alexander. The period concludes with the abolition in 1838 of the apprenticeship scheme that replaced slavery in the West Indies in 1834. Show full item record. The thesis explores the contribution of Scotland to the abolition of the slave trade and Caribbean slavery during the long eighteenth century. The starting date marks the first case before the Court of Session of a black slave in Scotland seeking freedom; that of Jamie Montgomery, who ran away from his master in Beith in 1756. The first chapter is a survey of historians' assessment of the factors which contributed to the abolition of slavery in the nineteenth century.

This book starts with a Virginian slave seeking his freedom in Scotland in 1756 and ends with the abolition of the apprenticeship scheme in the West Indian colonies in 1838. Contemporary documents and periodicals reveal a groundswell of revulsion to what was described as "e;the horrible traffik in humans"e;. Petitions to Parliament came from remote islands in Shetland as well as from large public meetings in cities. In a land steeped in religion, ministers and church leaders took the lead in giving theological support to the cause of abolition.

This book starts with a Virginian slave seeking his freedomin Scotland in 1756 and ends with the abolition of the apprenticeship scheme in the West Indian colonies in 1838. Contemporary documents and periodicals reveal a groundswell of revulsion to what was described as "the horrible traffik in humans".

Published by: Edinburgh University Press. Contemporary documents and periodicals reveal a groundswell of revulsion to what was described as the horrible traffik in humans".

Iain Whyte, as Drescher has argued for provincial England .

Iain Whyte, as Drescher has argued for provincial England, argues that too little attention has been paid to the role of Scotland in this extraordinary reform effort. Collectively, these efforts, according to Whyte, delayed abolition.

After the abolition of slavery in the British Empire, attention turned to America in the 1840s. Support for the new Free Church from Northern and Southern States led to a nationwide campaign to ‘Send Back the Money’ and have no fellowship with slaveholders, led largely by Presbyterian Secessionists and Quaker abolitionists. What type of file do you want? RIS.

Although much has been written about Scottish involvement in slavery, the contribution of Scots to the abolition of black slavery has not yet been sufficiently recognised. This book starts with a Virginian slave seeking his freedom in Scotland in 1756 and ends with the abolition of the apprenticeship scheme in the West Indian colonies in 1838.Contemporary documents and periodicals reveal a groundswell of revulsion to what was described as "the horrible traffik in humans". Petitions to Parliament came from remote islands in Shetland as well as from large public meetings in cities. In a land steeped in religion, ministers and church leaders took the lead in giving theological support to the cause of abolition. The contributions of five London Scots who were pivotal to the campaign throughout Britain are set against opposition to abolition from many Scots with commercial interests in the slave trade and the sugar plantations.Missionaries and miners, trades guilds and lawyers all played their parts in challenging slavery. Many of their struggles and frustrations are detailed for the first time in an assessment of the unique contribution made by Scotland and the Scots to the destruction of an institution whose effects are still with us today.