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eBook Syria: A Historical Architectural Guide download

by Warwick Ball

eBook Syria: A Historical Architectural Guide download ISBN: 190176446X
Author: Warwick Ball
Publisher: Melisende (July 4, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 298
ePub: 1101 kb
Fb2: 1957 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mobi lrf lrf mbr
Category: History
Subcategory: Asia

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Syria: A Historical and Architectural Guide as Want to Read

Syria is the Middle East's best kept secret. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Syria: A Historical and Architectural Guide as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Warwick Ball is a Near Eastern archaeologist and author who spent over thirty years carrying out excavations . The only book currently competing with Ball's to fill this gap is "The Monuments of Syria: A Guide" by Ross Burns.

Warwick Ball is a Near Eastern archaeologist and author who spent over thirty years carrying out excavations, architectural studies and monumental restoration throughout the Middle East and adjacent regions. He first visited Syria in 1972 and has been back numerous times since. The latter is a Baedeker-style encyclopedic gazeteer of most/all Syrian archaeological sites; its broad scope means you get descriptions of many minor sites you are unlikely to visit, but not always as much information as you would like on the major sites you will see.

The site was designated a national monument in Syria and a buffer zone was established in 2007. Warwick Ball, Syria: A Historical and Architectural Guide, 1994. p. 228. ^ "Site of Palmyra".

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is a distinguished writer and archaeologist who has conducted excavations in Afghanistan, Iran, Libya and Ethiopia. From 1972-1981 he worked in Afghanistan under successive regimes from kingdom to Soviet occupation. He has published numerous books, which include" Syria: A Historical and Architectural Guide" (1994), "Rome in the East: The Transformation of an Empire "(2000) and (with Leonard Harrow) "Cairo to Kabul: Afghan and Islamic Studies Presented to Ralph Pinder-Wilson" (2002). Rome in the East won the James Henry Breasted Prize for History in 2000, and was Choice's Outstanding Academic Book in the same year.

Syria is the Middle East's best kept secret.

Google Earth has only rendered a fraction of the old architecture in Syria, but these that are in 3d are some of the largest and most popular according to, "Syria: A historical and architectural guide by Warwick Ball. Umayyad Mosque Bosra theater (where ISIS execured 30+ soldiers on stage) Castle Alhsn (Krak des Chevaliers) Waterwheels Hama Sanctuary of Bel in Palmyra (ISIS blew up) Palmyra Citadel. The majority of these structures are built in Roman style. Syria experienced a heavy influence from Rome when it was in power.

Ball, Warwick (2007). Syria: A Historical and Architectural Guide. Riley-Smith, Jonathan (2012).

Comments: (5)
Vital Beast
Just what I needed for my latest writing assignment. Lots of useful information AND photos to give you a feel for the place. It's hard to write about a place you've never been to, so when I'm researching a place I need information and photos both; you can't write with any sense of authority without having a real sense of the place you're writing about. This book was one of several I ordered to get that "sense," and I have referred to it again and again. I was also fascinated to learn about the archaeological dig at Resafa, and about the Umayyad palace that had been there -- something several other books overlooked but which turned out to be critical information for me.

Well written, scholarly but spare, and jam-packed with good usable information.
Wrathshaper
The guide book is perfect for a quick reference source of the sights to see in Syria and I will surely carry it with me when I travel there next year. Only wish the maps had a little more detailed info or maybe more maps. But it is great for a planning my trip.
Dianazius
If you are traveling as a tourist to Syria (as I recently did), this is THE book to read: an intelligent layman's guide to the architectural (above all archaeological) wonders of Syria, which are the primary reason for tourist visits there.

It is one of only two texts in English which occupy the wide gap between, on the one hand, a cursory "Lonely Planet" guide approach (I much value "Lonely Planet" but, let's face it, such tourist manuals do not delve very deeply), and--on the other hand-- a mind-numbing plethora of narrowly focused, deadly dull, and hard-to-get academic monographs on small slices of Syrian phenomena.

The only book currently competing with Ball's to fill this gap is "The Monuments of Syria: A Guide" by Ross Burns. The latter is a Baedeker-style encyclopedic gazeteer of most/all Syrian archaeological sites; its broad scope means you get descriptions of many minor sites you are unlikely to visit, but not always as much information as you would like on the major sites you will see. We should be immensely grateful to Burns for his effort, but it is most appropriate for those planning to spend more than two weeks or so in Syria and to go beyond all the major sites. For those spending 2 weeks or less, Ball's book is the one for you if you only want to buy one text. (But you still might well consider Burns' book as a very useful adjunct.) Besides the virtues of its individual site descriptions, Ball's text offers very helpful and concise introductory overviews of the history and geography of Syria, and above all a broad survey of the various architectural trends and styles one will see at the different sites.

A word about the author. Warwick Ball is a long-time Middle Eastern archaeologist (with much experience in Syria and Jordan) who retired his trowel some years ago to found a blue-chip tour company (with focus on the Middle East) headquartered in Scotland, where he now lives. I serendipitously encountered him and his book at a lecture he gave on Afghanistan at Washington, DC's Smithsonian Institution in early 2010.

A couple minor nits re the book. Ball can be repetitive in harping on certain points, especially. his all too oft stated observations which link virtually any cubist structure in Syria back to early South Arabian prototypes. He is a "booster" on Syria (as you would expect from one who spent a lot of time and effort there), so you need to discount a bit his more enthusiastic claims about everything Syrian and some of the sites there. That said, I can tell you the country IS worth visiting and does have some "drop dead" archaeological sites and is getting a lot of Western (above all West European) tourism nowadays. Finally, the maps Ball employs for the book are borrowed and not designed specifically to support his text, so they are not entirely satisfactory. Above all, if you contemplate wandering around the souks (markets) of old Damascus, you're going to need a more detailed map than this book provides if you don't want to get hopelessly lost.

But these are minor criticisms which should not obscure the great virtue of this book: it almost single-handedly fills a need for those bound for Syria, and it does so very well.
Tcaruieb
Judging a book by its cover is usually a dangerous practice. However, Ball and his publisher have created a book that is as attractive within as without. From the standpoint of layout, the most striking feature is that the colorful plates are complemented by text pages of approximately the same weight. This feature avoids the awkwardness often found in softbound texts interspersed with photographic sections.
The glossary is adequate, if not thorough, allowing for armchair reading by dilletantes in most cases. However, one will occasionally confront within a definition presented an unfamiliar word not elsewhere defined.
The only other awkwardness encountered in the American edition were the occasional British usages and grammatical anomalies. "Colour" and "spoilt" do not grate on the ear nearly as readily as "awoken." But the presence of "vividest" and "have begin" makes the reader wonder about either the book editor's thoroughness or familiarity with elements of grammar and composition.
In sum, I found Ball's work a thorough and colorful introduction to the topic with only the occasional flaw.
Clodebd
Syria is a very ancient country that dates back to the start of time and has seen a lot in its day, Syria has been a Muslim country for over 1,090 years and before that Syria was mainly Christian. Today, Syria is about 90% Muslim ( mostly Sunni, Alawite, and Druze) and 10% Christian ( mostly Syrian, Greek, and Armenian Orthodox). And both the Prophets of Christianity and Islam have came through Syria in their lifetimes. The population is 90% Arab (mainly Syrian 74.9%, Palestinian 3.9%, Bedouin 7.1%, and Iraqi), the rest are Kurds who live in northeastern Syria, Armenians who live mostly in Aleppo and Kassab, and Turkmens who all make up the remaining 10%.