carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » The Generalissimo: Chiang Kai-Shek and the Struggle for Modern China (Chinese Edition)

eBook The Generalissimo: Chiang Kai-Shek and the Struggle for Modern China (Chinese Edition) download

by Jay Taylor

eBook The Generalissimo: Chiang Kai-Shek and the Struggle for Modern China (Chinese Edition) download ISBN: 9571351725
Author: Jay Taylor
Publisher: Shi Bao Chu Ban/Tsai Fong Books (March 1, 2010)
Language: Chinese
Pages: 784
ePub: 1567 kb
Fb2: 1201 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lit azw mbr txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Asia

Chiang Kai-shek rivaled Mao as a dominant figure in the history of modern China. This enthralling book by Jay Taylor of Harvard University shows that conventional views of both Chiang and the Chinese civil war are caricatures.

Chiang Kai-shek rivaled Mao as a dominant figure in the history of modern China. Andrew J. Nathan, author of China's Transition. It is the first biography to make full use of the Chiang family archive.

Chiang Kai-shek was the "forgotten" Ally during World War 2. He was . This book is essentially a biography of Chiang Kai-shek, and frankly is one of the best books I have ever read

Chiang Kai-shek was the "forgotten" Ally during World War 2. He was President of the largest nation with the Allies, and the country that suffered more civilian deaths than any other. Yet,he was thrown under the bus time and time again. Many gloss over Chiang's contribution to Chinese history, but Taylor has written the definitive biography on the subject. It is, for better or worse, extremely detailed, lengthy, and completely uncritical. This book is essentially a biography of Chiang Kai-shek, and frankly is one of the best books I have ever read. If you really want to understand the China Taiwan issue, I highly recommend this book.

PDF On Jan 1, 2010, Steve Tsang and others published The Generalissimo: Chiang Kai-shek and . Despite some notable shortcomings, Jay Taylor has produced an important work. and the best book so far on Chiang Kai-shek. Chiang was probably the second-

Despite some notable shortcomings, Jay Taylor has produced an important work. Chiang was probably the second-. most important individual in the twentieth-century history of China-the pre-. eminent position clearly belongs to Mao Zedong. Until this book, he remained. one of the most misunderstood leaders of modern China. importance in the political, social and military life of China from 1926 to 1949

This book is noteworthy for the way in which Taylor portrays Chiang Kai-shek as a faithful disciple of Sun Yat-sen, who . For Taylor, Chiang spent his whole life attempting to achieve the same goal, . the modernisation of China.

This book is noteworthy for the way in which Taylor portrays Chiang Kai-shek as a faithful disciple of Sun Yat-sen, who dedicated his life to the transformation of China into a modernised nation.

Chiang Kai-shek, an autocratic, larger-than-life figure, dominates this story. A modernist as well as a neo-Confucianist, Chiang was a man of war who led the most ancient and populous country in the world through a quarter century of bloody revolutions, civil conflict, and wars of resistance against Japanese aggression. In 1949, when he was defeated by Mao Zedong-his archrival for leadership of China-he fled to Taiwan, where he ruled for another twenty-five years.

This enthralling book by Jay Taylor of Harvard University shows that conventional views of both Chiang and the Chinese civil war are caricatures. This includes Chiang's own diary, in which he wrote at least a page of classical Chinese daily from 1918 to 1972. Drawing heavily on Chinese sources including Chiang's diaries, The Generalissimo provides the most lively, sweeping, and objective biography yet of a man whose length of uninterrupted, active engagement at the highest levels in the march of history is excelled by few, if any, in modern history. Chiang Kai-Shek (also Jiang Jieshi) was one of the most polarising Chinese figures of the twentieth century, equally celebrated as the victor over the Japanese and reviled as the man who lost the.

Chiang Kai-shek was the chief shaper of the Republic of China on the mainland, a major Allied leader in World War II, Mao Zedong's principal antagonist in the Chinese Civil War, and the primary architect of what became "the Taiwan miracle. For decades, he was the dominant figure in Americans' imagination of the Far East.

Comments: (7)
Frei
Since I was growing up in a village in Northeast China in the 1980s, the adult people there liked talking about old time stories, Mao and Chiang are among the most interesting figures in the topics. I became curious about the two men early from my childhood.

Although I don’t believe any works are 100% objective, I am especially skeptical about the biographies published in their own country, they always giving me an impression: too biased, yet is getting better now. I chose to read the two men in original English version books, also as a way to challenge and improve my English language ability.

After reading Jung Chang’s worldwide bestseller, Mao: The Unknown Story, a biography focuses on Mao’s dark side, in a not well recognized serious way. I turned to read books about Chiang, at first I read Jonathan Fenby’s book, Chiang Kai Shek: China’s Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost, it is a nice biography, yet I didn’t finish, I like its book cover, Chiang’s that portrait is better represent his strong will and looks handsome. Recommend by The Economist, I switched to read Jay Taylor’s book, The Generalissimo: Chiang Kai-shek and the Struggle for Modern China. I think Chiang’s historical position in 20th century China is his vision and struggle for defending and building a modern China, not because he lost the civil war or a nation to Mao. Being a hero does not depend on success or failure.

I really like Jay Taylor’s writing style for this book, objective and tried to find insights about the most important events in 20th century China, he used facts to illustrated Chiang’s personality. His viewpoints are quite balanced, not really Western or Chinese, nor the conventional view to describe him as civil war loser, a brutal dictator who lacks charisma. Jay Taylor spent many years as a Foreign Affair Officer working in both mainland China and Taiwan, and did meet Chiang in person, through five years extensive research, he is the right person who is able to write a extraordinary book about such contradictory figure in China’s history.

From ideological perspective, I think his neo-Confucianism, Three People’s Principles and Christian value are more suitable for building a modern China. He was born in rich costal Zhejiang province, traditional culture reserved well there. So there is no doubt, he was man with Confucius value, he received military education in Japan during his youth time, that Japanese samurai code: discipline, loyalty, honor and sacrifice did influence him, everything combined in from his early years, made himself generally a neo-Confucian.

Chiang is the heir to Dr. Sun Yat-sen in KMT, he was the winner for many power conflicts inside and outside the party. As an old time political leader, he is no big different to others, master of intrigues, cracked down his opponents, butchered a lot of people without mercy. He led China from war lord period, war against Japanese invasion, maintain Taiwan’s position in Cold War, dealt with super powers throughout the times, there were countless suffering, humiliations, ordeals, these jobs need a leader with strong will and pragmatic visionary minds. China survived from that painful and humiliating period, China is the winner, and Chiang himself is the all time ultimate survivor, even the danger of collapses were always with him.

As a Chinese person, I like Mao’s poems very much. However, for personality, I admire Chiang. He was calm, staid, emotional, disciplined, he tolerated many intellectuals who against him and also corruptions of in his circles. He showed his respects for lives and culture, never tried to purge everybody or everything in his life. He is a man with bottom line, maybe, his personality is one of the reasons making he losing many golden opportunities, and finally defected by the extremely ruthless Mao.

20th century’s China, was so complex and will always be researched and debated. I believe that the struggle of Chinese leaders and their people made the way for China’s rise in 21st century. We, Chinese people should thank to the western invaders, as they brought modern civilization and the right path for human evolution even there were lot of sufferings and humiliations, I despise that kind of superficially criticizing that Western powers for invading China, it was them who influenced/wake up our ancestors’ revolutionary sprit, to fight against Manchu and cut that ugly & stupid pigtails on our heads, liberated us from the being the slaves of emperors and corrupt beuracracts, finally put us on the path of modernization. Yet some backward ways of thinking are still lingering today.

We should never forget the struggles and sacrifices of revolutionary martyrs and leaders who wanted to transform China and won the dignity of Chinese people. The Communists propagandized Chiang as a puppet of the United States/West, the Nationalists depicted Mao as a puppet of Stalin, the Soviet Union, in reality, just as the book told that both Chiang and Mao are the same kind of nationalists, they insisted on the soveignty of China and fought for the legal term with great global powers. They have to get the support from modern super-powers, have to play games with them. From my reading knowledge, as depicted in Jay Taylor’s book, I believe that Chiang reserved more respect for Chinese people for dealing with Western powers. There were a lot of humiliations, angers, sacrifices, etc. throughout his politics and wars.

History always taught us a lot of things. What I learned from this book, from Chiang is his strong will and tactics to manage crisis, his belief and love for the country. His strong will power, rationally thinking, emotional style, never surrender to overwhelming enemies touched my heart a lot. It is the spirit I should have in my life, my business adventures.

This has become one of the most important reading experiences since my childhood.

At last, sincerely thanks to the author: Mr. Jay Taylor.
Andriodtargeted
In the early 20th century, 5000 years of civilization finally came to a boiling point - China, the world's only surviving ancient civilization, must face it's biggest challenge yet. The rise and fall of Chiang Kai-shek, the man who took on the insurmountable task of managing an unmanageable country, to fight the monsters of modern war machines with foot soldiers, to unite the broken spirits of a billion souls, is detailed like never before with a creditable author who aligns the stories of various historical sources with Chiang Kai-shek's own - his famous dairy. A must read for anyone who loves history.
Elildelm
A good prism into the events and changes happened in China during the last century. The selection of historical pictures alone would have made this a worth possession.
Marilore
Taylor provides a fair and sympathetic view of Chiang Kai-Shek's life as a magnificent yet conflicted leader through decades of revolution, wars, nation-building, defeats both military and political, during China's emergence from ancient dynastic governance to a modern state. He brings to life the many nuanced, complex relationships among key KMT and CCP figures that may be difficult for the Occidental mind to appreciate. His accounts of Russian and American roles, interwoven into the backdrop of Japanese invasions and WWII, provides insight into the dynamics of Russo-Sino-American geopolitical relationships during the Cold War. Taylor's easy-reading style and thoroughly researched work will challenge the conventional negative standing Chiang has occupied in recent decades among many Americans. A very enjoyable, fascinating read.
Enila
The Generalissimo sheds shocking new light on Sino-American relations, and the view isn't pretty. Under a string of administrations (in fact all of them) from the 1930s on, the United States showed itself to be an untrustworthy ally, shamelessly betraying the Nationalist Chinese again and again. Supposed "wise men" like Acheson and Kissinger come across as buffoons and sellouts to the communists. The most amazing insight of the book is that the prosperous, democratic Taiwan of today is exactly what the "wise men" of the 1940s insisted that Chiang Kai Shek could never deliver and his communists opponents would. Tens of millions of dead and decades of suppression later, it now seems that China is coming around, not to Mao's vision, but to Chiang's.
Sharpbrew
Fantastic. Highly recommended. One or two orthographical infelilicites but otherwise a great read and very informative indeed.
Naril
The History of China in the 20th Century has been usually colored by the ideology of the times and of the writer. China had a turbulent History, living the first half of the century in war, and war accounts are usually told by the winner. Chiang Kai-Shek lost the war, and so I think his role has always been underrated. This is a more balanced account of those times, and Chiang's voice comes through his journals, and we can feel the tremendous burden that he carried on his shoulders, trying to unify a fragmented country, while fighting an almost hopeless war against a powerful and ruthless invader. In my opinion his stature should be equal to Churchill's: they faced the same crucial choice, fight and risk annihilation or surrender. Both chose to fight, and we owe them both the same respect.