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eBook The Korean War download

by Brian Catchpole

eBook The Korean War download ISBN: 0786709243
Author: Brian Catchpole
Publisher: Basic Books (November 9, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1841 kb
Fb2: 1568 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lit azw lrf lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Asia

However as Korea has been in the news recently, I thought it time to remedy that.

However as Korea has been in the news recently, I thought it time to remedy that. I was surprised at just how mobile the first part of the war was, followed by a static later half, during which much slaughter took place, reminiscent of WWI. I was also surprised at how truley international the UN forces were, with The Korean War has been called the "forgotten war", and certainly it was one that I was ignorant about.

Brian Catchpole’s most popular book is Atlas of World History. The Korean War by. Brian Catchpole. Historical Atlas of the 20th Century, 1900-1999 by. John Haywood, Brian Catchpole.

In this book, Brian Catchpole provides a political and military history of the movements and actions leading up to the war and on through to 1953. Although this book does not get bogged down in any one facet of the war, it does do a good job at covering the political plans of President Truman, the tactical maneuvers of Gen. MacArthur and his commanders, and the grinding ground/sea/air battles that took place. Some will be astonished at the power that MacArthur wielded as the commander of .

Author:Catchpole, Brian. The Korean War. Book Binding:Hardback. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 3 pre-owned listings.

In this book Brian Catchpole recounts the military operations – the slogging war on the ground as well as the UN naval superiority and the importance of air power

In this book Brian Catchpole recounts the military operations – the slogging war on the ground as well as the UN naval superiority and the importance of air power. He also explains the diplomatic background of international relations between China and the West, the communist propaganda in the north, the issue of prisoners-of-war, the talks leading to the armistice and the creation of the demilitarized zone

The Korean war 1950-1953.

The Korean war 1950-1953.

The Korean war. by. Catchpole, Brian. Korean War, 1950-1953. New York : Carroll & Graf Publishers. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Catchpole avoids this pitfall in two ways: first, he incorporates new material from the recently opened Russian and . A practical introduction to the Korean War, particularly useful for readers interested in British military contributions to the conflict. maps and diagrams throughout).

Catchpole avoids this pitfall in two ways: first, he incorporates new material from the recently opened Russian and Chinese archives into his book; and second, he includes several excellent chapters detailing British and Commonwealth service in the conflict. This new material transforms the traditionally messy narrative about the war’s end into a coherent story of international cooperation and bravery in the face of communist aggression. Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 2000.

From the American attempts to take back Pusan from the North Korean communist forces at the outset of the war in 1950, to the . assault on Inchon and capture of Seoul, to the final bloody battles of Pork Chop, Old Baldy, and the Hook in 1953, this military history authoritatively chronicles the conflict that became America's first unwinnable foreign war. And gravely demonstrated the limits of the West's power in the East.

Main articles: Korean War § Police Action: US intervention, and Initial . Summers, Harry G. (2001), Korean War Almanac, Replica Books, ISBN 978-0-7351-0209-5.

Main articles: Korean War § Police Action: US intervention, and Initial phase of the Korean War. On the night of June 25, 1950, ten divisions of the North Korean People's Army launched a full-scale invasion of the nation's neighbor to the south, the Republic of Korea. Catchpole, Brian (2001), The Korean War, Robinson Publishing, ISBN 978-1-84119-413-4.

From the American attempts to take back Pusan from the North Korean communist forces at the outset of the war in 1950, to the U.S. assault on Inchon and capture of Seoul, to the final bloody battles of Pork Chop, Old Baldy, and the Hook in 1953, this military history authoritatively chronicles the conflict that became America's first unwinnable foreign war and gravely demonstrated the limits of the West's power in the East.
Comments: (5)
Exellent
To be brief and frank: Brian Catchpole nailed it right on target!! He is very meticulous in every detail from the general aspects of the war regarding diplomacy and the squabbles between MacArthur and Truman and dealings between Mao and Stalin right down to the intense ground, naval and air combat in the Korean peninsula itself; weaponry, tactics, battles, engagements the works! The man is outstanding and I would not purchase any other account! GRIPPING AND CAPTIVATING!!
JoJosho
In this book, Brian Catchpole provides a political and military history of the movements and actions leading up to the war and on through to 1953. Although this book does not get bogged down in any one facet of the war, it does do a good job at covering the political plans of President Truman, the tactical maneuvers of Gen. MacArthur and his commanders, and the grinding ground/sea/air battles that took place.
Some will be astonished at the power that MacArthur wielded as the commander of U.N. forces. He was quite a diplomat, building a coalition of nations to fight the Chinese and Russian fortified North Korean People's Army (NKPA).
The book also gives the reader a good insight into the life of an infantryman, be it the 8th Army, X Corp, or Republic of Korea (ROK) regiments, trying to survive the cold Korean winters and defend against crushing attacks.
No single book can cover all of what transpired during the Korean War, but this book should satisfy all but the most erudite war buff.
Shaktit
Brian Catchpole's book, 'THE KOREAN WAR: 1950-1953', should be retitled, 'HOW THE U.S. MARINE CORPS SINGLE-HANDEDLY WON THE KOREAN WAR'. Catchpole drank the proverbial Kool-Aid, swallowing the myth of 'THE ALMIGHTY, INVINCIBLE, DIVINELY-INSPIRED U.S. MARINE CORPS', and thereupon based most of his account of the Korean War. Therefore, his book is grossly inaccurate and openly slanderous toward the U.S. Army, whose sacrifice, blood and courage he dismisses with true cruelty. The heart of every American who lost a loved-one serving in the U.S. Army in the Korean War, will be broken, time and time again, by Catchpole's cynical, deliberate misrepresentation of the facts, constant insults of the U.S. Army, from top to bottom, and shameless propagandization of the Marine Corps' role in the war. While Catchpole is an excellent writer who could have done a spectacular job with this project, his personal biases sabotaged this work, making it a complete waste of time to read, for anyone interested in historical truth.
Zorve
The author, Brian Catchpole is British, and the book notes all the British units fighting in the war, as well as all the other United Nations troops. United States troops are also included, as they provided most of the troops, next to the Koreans, but the Brits provided the 2nd most, after the U.S. British Commandos were in the fighting at the Chosin Reservoir, for example.
The horrendous intelligence failure to see over 300,000 Chinese troops is noted, as the stupidity of Gen Almond to want to continue the advance to the Yalu in spite of the masses of Chinese attacking.
The book includes chapters not usually included in this war.
There are chapters about the role of the Navy,and Air Force, and special operations behind the lines.
The contributions of the Greeks, Turks, French, Canadians, Kiwis. and Australians, Filipinos, and Thais are included.
The Koreans did the most suffering, by the millions. Souel was a ruin, having been taken 4 times in the War twice by the Chinese, twice by us.
The Japanese were the big benefactors of the war, with billions of military spending causing a boom in Japan. Japan was our repair shop, storage shop, and they made many of our vehicles.
For example, the Toyota president had tried just before the war started to form a partnership with Ford. Ford refused, and then Toyota had to make thousands of vehicles on its own for the military when the war broke out, and kept all the profit.
The POW issue is included.
The war was forgotten before it even ended. When troops came home, no one welcomed them. The public did not even notice.
The Brits did not declassifiy much of the Korean War information until the 1990.s.
Differences in equipment were noted, with the Brits with their sten guns and rum ration, the Canadians with huge supplies of Labatt beer.
The battles of the Hook and Pork Chop Hill are gone into in some detail, as they were the final battles.
A chapter is included on the various perspectives on the war from the different country' points of view. The McCarthy era, Ike, is discussed, as well as the effect in China and Britain.
It is a very good book for an overall view of the Korean war, especially if you are British.