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by Simon Strong

eBook Shining Path : Terror and Revolution in Peru download ISBN: 0812921801
Author: Simon Strong
Publisher: Crown; 1st U.S. ed edition (March 9, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 286
ePub: 1656 kb
Fb2: 1732 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mbr azw doc lrf
Category: History

An ex-library book and may have standard library stamps and/or stickers.

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Sendero Luminoso (Guerrilla group), Government, Resistance to. Publisher. New York : Times books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on January 26, 2015. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

I was in Peru for the better part of 1993 soon after Chairman Gonzalo was captured by the sure hand of Alberto Fujimori. On my 1st visit, I saw the blown up buildings long before Oklahoma City and 9/11. After my 1st trip in '93, I picked up this book, was mezmerized, and upon my return to Peru, terrified by the Sendero. This book is so vivid I dreamt fitfully about the revolution as if I was caught in the crossfire.

Yet another book on Peru's frightening Shining Path insurgency, this one by a British journalist who lived in Peru from 1988 to 1992. Shining Path: Terror and Revolution in Peru. Illuminating, particularly on the Shining Path's international activities, but ultimately inconclusive, this volume ends with the September 1992 capture of the Shining Path's Marxist leader, Manuel Abimael Guzmán, by members of the antiterrorism. Yet another book on Peru's frightening Shining Path insurgency, this one by a British journalist who lived in Peru from 1988 to 1992.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Quest For Hermes Trismegistus.

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Simon Strong, Shining Path: Terror and Revolution in Peru (New York: Times Books, 1992), 3. oogle Scholar. Ruh Allah Khomeini, Islam and Revolution, trans. and ed. Hamid Algar (Berkeley, CA: Mizan Press, 1981), 27. The majority of this text is a translation of Khomeini’s Islamic Government. A book that originated in a series of lectures given by Khomeini at Najaf between January 21 and February 8, 1970. In this book Khomeini details the theoretical bases of his religio-political philosophy, the need for an Islamic government, the specific form of such a government, and a program for the establishment of an Islamic government in Iran.

The Communist Party of Peru – Shining Path (Spanish: Partido Comunista del Perú – Sendero Luminoso), more commonly known as the Shining Path (Spanish: Sendero Luminoso), is a revolutionary communist party and political organization in Peru espousing.

The Communist Party of Peru – Shining Path (Spanish: Partido Comunista del Perú – Sendero Luminoso), more commonly known as the Shining Path (Spanish: Sendero Luminoso), is a revolutionary communist party and political organization in Peru espousing Marxism–Leninism–Maoism and Marxism–Leninism–Maoism–Gonzalo Thought. When it first launched the internal conflict in Peru in 1980, its goal was to overthrow the state by guerrilla warfare and replace it with a New Democracy.

Strong, Simon, Shining Path: Terror and Revolution in Peru, Times Books, 1992.

However, the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement contributed to the death and destruction tallies at a much lesser, but still significant, rate. Strong, Simon, Shining Path: Terror and Revolution in Peru, Times Books, 1992. ROUTE OF THE PERUVIAN REVOLUTION Movimiento Revolucionario Tъpac Amaru (Tъpac Amaru Devrimci Hareketi) (MRTA). Documents of the Second Central Committee of . August, 1988 Second Central Committee of MRTA.

A detailed account of Peru's Shining Path explores the devastating impact of the terrorist revolutionaries on Peru; exposes the group's history, bizarre ideology, and global links; and examines the potential international implications of the Shining Path. 12,500 first printing.
Comments: (2)
Zadora
I read this after Robin Kirk's translation of Gustavo Gorriti's history of the same name. Strong provides for English-speaking readers a better overview of the origins of its leader, Abimael Guzmán, and a context within to place the SP among Andean and Peruvian influences. Gorriti writes for a Peruvian audience and assumes they're familiar with his exploration of internecine government, military, and police struggles against each other and the senderistas. Gorriti hits harder against the Leninist and Stalinist inspiration for Guzmán's deviations into devolved Maoism and then "Gonzalo thought." Strong downplays the brutality of groupthink and brainwashing within the SP but offers a non-sensationalistic representation of their campaign.

The energy of certain chapters in Gorriti about SP punishment of dissenters, the raid by police on Ayacucho's prison, and the fevered rhetoric of Guzmán's millenarian apocalyptic visions will not be found in Strong. Instead, in muted journalistic fashion, he progresses through the founding of SP, its Incan and Andean mythmaking--a chapter differing than Gorriti, who stresses its political philosophy via its leader's European intellectual influences--its Chinese and Maoist connections, the cocaine trade and the Reagan-Bush early 90s attempts to counter it and gain Peruvian clout against the guerrillas in return for greater US control over the war on drugs and the Peru's regime--the resulting terror as government and guerrilas caught millions in the middle, the role of Catholic, Mormon, and evangelical churches, the cholera epidemic and Fujimori's takeover, and, an area nowhere else that I have read in English covered, the role of the SP within the RCP and the International Maoist and radical movements in the early 1990s. A final glimpse into the first "liberated zone" of Lima in the shantytown of Raucana shows that, surprisingly, in a downplayed SP scenario, their hope of a red utopia--at least for a time--might actually thrive.

I found four areas weakening the whole. Lack of footnotes and often even a mention of his published sources (although a helpful bibliography appears) diminishes greatly the use of this text for further research on specific points the author raises. For instance, Strong relies upon what are probably linguistic coincidences between Chinese and Quechua terms as he labors to make connections between the two realms and the resultant Asian strain in Peruvian native culture and therefore its manipulation by the SP into its deviant Maoism. He also, in my opinion, credits too much Andean roots for the SP, when in fact much of their ideology emerged from Guzmán's Kantian and Marxian studies, only later grafting on bits of Incan "tradition" to lure indigenistas into their often middle- and upper-middle class-led ranks. He wanders off the SP into European racism in the final chapter, when a tighter focus upon the role of the Peruvian diaspora in supporting (or not?) SP needed greater attention. His vignette of "The Musical Guerrilla Army" debuting for a Sun-Peru SP front, singing in Spanish "the people's blood has a beautiful aroma" while renting out a Richmond (London) tapas bar for the night serves as a cautionary tale for all lovers of revolution who never suffer themselves the sacrifice.
Samugul
Don't be fooled by the sensationalist title, this is no right wing polemic about the horrors of communism. This is a balanced and essentially apolitical examination of the Shining Path revolutionary movement. It shows how corrupt and violent Peruvian society was (is?) at every level. It's a short book and an easy read, but extremely valuable in terms of gaining an understanding of the historical and socio-economic conditions that made a revolutionary force like the Shining Path not only possible, but inevitable. The author has no discernable political bias other than an obvious sympathy for the Amerindian peasants who were the victims of ALL the power brokers: the government, the rebels, the Catholic Church, Protestant missionaries, the cocaine trafficers and the DEA. Strong makes no apologies for the Shining Path and clearly shows how ruthless and coercive they were, but it also provides insight as to how and why the rebels gained such a wide level of popular support. What I found most interesting was how closely Maoist doctrine mirrored the indigenous culture and how the rebels co-opted the peasant mythology in order to advocate for their revolution.
Ultimately disturbing - there are no heroes here - this is a book that fosters understanding, although it offers no solutions.