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eBook The Mammoth Book of Eyewitness Ancient Rome: The History of the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire in the Words of Those Who Were There (Mammoth Books) download

by Jon E. Lewis

eBook The Mammoth Book of Eyewitness Ancient Rome: The History of the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire in the Words of Those Who Were There (Mammoth Books) download ISBN: 078671168X
Author: Jon E. Lewis
Publisher: Running Press (March 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 544
ePub: 1406 kb
Fb2: 1719 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: txt mobi lrf lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Ancient Civilizations

The Mammoth Book of Eyewitness Ancient Rome is the history of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire in the words of those who saw it firsthand.

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The Mammoth Book of Eyewitness Ancient Rome- The History of the Rise & Fall of the Roman Empire in the Words of Those Who Were There by Lewis,Jon . .Recommended By. Numerous educational institutions recommend us, including Oxford University, Michigan State University, and University of Minnesota. Many thanks to the organisations who are kindly helping us through grants or sponsorships. We have active partnerships to pursue common goals with the following organisations: Navigate. Home Maps Index Explore Random Page.

Jon E. Lewis is a historian and writer, whose books on history and military history are sold worldwide. He holds graduate and postgraduate degrees in history. His work has appeared in New Statesman, the Independent, Time Out and the Guardian. He lives in Herefordshire with Jon E.

Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by Running Press

Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by Running Press. Need help ASAP? We have you covered with 24/7 instant online tutoring. Connect with one of our tutors now. ABOUT CHEGG.

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is a six-volume work by the English historian Edward Gibbon

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is a six-volume work by the English historian Edward Gibbon. It traces Western civilization (as well as the Islamic and Mongolian conquests) from the height of the Roman Empire to the fall of Byzantium. Volume I was published in 1776 and went through six printings. Volumes II and III were published in 1781; volumes IV, V, and VI in 1788–1789.

This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. The first volume of a 12 volume set of Gibbon’s magisterial history of the end of the Roman Empire, one of the greatest works of history written during the Enlightenment

This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. The first volume of a 12 volume set of Gibbon’s magisterial history of the end of the Roman Empire, one of the greatest works of history written during the Enlightenment. It may not be used in any way for profit.

An encyclopedia in a single book, Ancient Rome covers all the bases of Roman history, making it the ideal first book for anyone interested in the Roman Empire. Whether a child with a voracious appetite for "all things Roman", or an adult interested in binge-boning up on Roman history, this book is a perfect start. It has over 1,000 beautiful color photographs of archaeological artifacts and e reproductions. It has topics covering lots of territory.

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Vol. 1, 1776; Vols. IV-VI, 1788) by Edward Gibbon

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Vol. IV-VI, 1788) by Edward Gibbon.

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The Mammoth Book of Eyewitness Ancient Rome is the history of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire in the words of those who saw it firsthand. Never before in such detail has there been a history of this great and influential civilization that continues to mark the landscape (the Colosseum, the Roman roads, the aqueduct at Nimes), our language, our calendar ("July" for Julius Caesar), our laws, our traditions (carrying a bride across the threshold), and our very thoughts. With all the gossip of I, Claudius and the excitement of Gladiator (but none of the historical inaccuracy), The Mammoth Book of Eyewitness Ancient Rome is a unique tour into the most important civilization in the West.
Comments: (7)
Xor
The editor includes little snippets introducing each passage. Takes you through the basics of Rome's ancient history. Not a modern-day historian's analysis of Rome, just Rome as written about by the people and historians of the time. Includes jewels like Caesar's autobiographical (written is third person) accounts of his battles in Britain and with Pompey, Josephus' account of the sack of Jerusalem, and much much more. I knew very little about Rome before this book (and still do) but do feel like it gave me a fascinating intro to the time. I continue to talk about this book with friends and family, but won't be lending it out... it's a keeper!
huckman
Choices for translations of source texts are great and vibrant. Have read other translations of some of the material that were dry or just plain booty. Particularly liked choices for MT Cicero, Juvenal, Suetonius, and St.Augustine. Nice range and breadth of material. Well rounded and comprehensive for this endeavor. A few maps or images would've be been nice, but it's excellent as is for its price point.
September
I love history and especially ancient history.Was very pleased with the book.
Mitynarit
Anyone who wishes to gain a better understanding of Roman life and culture ought to read some the authors contained in this anthology.
Yellow Judge
It was all the usual stuff I can find in any history book. I was hopping for more.
Usishele
Browsed through when arrived. With commentaries from Cicero , Pliny the elder, marc Antony it reads like a gossip column you can't turn awayfrom
Steel balls
The flaws are many. The "editing" doesn't extend much beyond cutting and pasting a lot of material together. There are zero editorial comments, although there were places where judicious comments would have been helpful. The footnotes are all, I believe, from the original sources, which are generally other collections. For instance, if the book quotes Herodian, the bibliography will cite, not the text of Herodian, but something like, "Great Texts on Ancient Rome" or something. So primary texts were usually not the sources. (The book contains nothing but excerpts from primary texts, but the editor got these excerpts from secondary sources.)

And yes, as someone else has pointed out, the translations are sometimes shaky.

Also, the word "Eyewitness" is frequently a misnomer. One of the most frequently cited authors is Tacitus, for instance, who was by no means an eyewitness to the things he wrote about. Nor was Suetonius, nor Ammianus Marcellinus, nor Cassius Dio, nor Appian. Even Cicero was writing about things that he hadn't actually witnessed in a lot of cases.

However, having said all that, this is a fun book to read because of one strong aspect of the editing, and that was selection of material. Most of the texts included here are terrific, from Pliny's account of the eruption of Vesuvius, to humorous letters written by various people (to name just a few things). You really get a broad cross-section of Roman society across the centuries.

One thing to note is that a complete novice to Roman history and culture would probably be frustrated by this book. I don't discourage the novice from giving the book a shot, but if you don't know who Cicero was, and Cato and Caesar and Antony and Octavian and Agrippa and Vitellius and Domitian and Trajan and Josephus and Alaric and on and on, not to mention the historical backgrounds of each, then you'll feel somewhat lost reading this book, because it does cover a huge amount of historical ground in a mere 500 pages. If you're motivated to learn, then this will be an excellent book. If you're interested more in casual reading, you might not like it.
I really enjoyed this book because it wasn't just a bunch of impersonal historical facts piled into one book. These are writings and historical accounts from those who were present at the time the history was being made. This book gives a unique perspective about the Roman Empire that most history books don't.