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eBook The American Backwoods Frontier: An Ethical and Ecological Interpretation (Creating the North American Landscape) download

by Professor Terry G. Jordan,Professor Matti E. Kaups

eBook The American Backwoods Frontier: An Ethical and Ecological Interpretation (Creating the North American Landscape) download ISBN: 0801836867
Author: Professor Terry G. Jordan,Professor Matti E. Kaups
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press (December 1, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 360
ePub: 1994 kb
Fb2: 1452 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf rtf lrf lit
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Terry G. Jordan and Matti Kaups studied America's frontier culture to discern its ethnic heritage. In this book, Jordan and Kaups trace America's frontier culture to a surprising corner of Europe's "hard scrabble periphery.

Terry G. Most historians of the American frontier locate its origin in the vicinity of the Delaware Valley. In the 1700s, about a century before Davy Crockett, residents of this corner of Europe depicted their frontiersmen fighting bears! Jordan and Kaups consider evidence from literature, anthropology and architecture.

The American Backwoods Frontier book. Start by marking The American Backwoods Frontier: An Ethical and Ecological Interpretation as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The American Backwoods Frontier: An Ethical and Ecological Interpretation. by. Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov

In The American Backwoods Frontier Terry Jordan and Matti Kaups offer a detailed analysis of this remarkable culture and present an indepth study of its colonial origins.

In The American Backwoods Frontier Terry Jordan and Matti Kaups offer a detailed analysis of this remarkable culture and present an indepth study of its colonial origins. Historians and geographers have traditionally traced these origins to the eighteenth-century Scotch-Irish and German settlers of the Pennsylvania backwoods. Jordan and Kaups reject this view, identifying seventeenth-century Delaware Valley Finns-and their Indian neighbors-as the major shapers of frontier culture.

Murray Media (NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FL, .

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Jordan, Terry G. Publication date. Bibliography: p. 287-331. Kaups, Matti E. Bookplateleaf. Ethnology - Delaware River Region (. Finnish Americans - Delaware River Region (. - History, Frontier and pioneer life - Delaware River Region (. Human geography - Delaware River Region (. Delaware River Region (. Baltimore ; London : Johns Hopkins University Press. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control).

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Hard Times in Paradise: Coos Bay, Oregon, 1850-1986by William G. Robbins.

The American Backwoods Frontier: An Ethnic and Ecological Interpretation. GEOGR J. Jordan.

Comments: (5)
Negal
History is my thing.
FAscinating.WHo would have thought that Finns ,Swedes and certain Native American practices formed the basis for pioneer practices that were almost universally adopted in the US?
This is far from the YANkee -Scotch Irish centric view of the pioneer.Truth is a powerful argument.Where did the forest pioneer practices come from when the immigrants came from areas where there were no forests.?Borrowed.
An interesting tidbit-In the settlement of Winthrop-Readfield Maine- the three Whittier BRos,from NH, used the slash burn and plant among the stumps strategy .Evidently this was radically new and people came from near and far to see this.Getting a crop in right away was very important and was a huge advantage to the pioneer settler.
A friend from PENN.was fascinated with this book and so was I.Well done.
I do believe that US culture is watered down ,adapted,and modified culture from somewhere else.There is little or nothing unique to the US in this area,.
The entry way of PEnn was a crucial area to the development of much of the cultural identity of our country.Major in fact
SiIеnt
I purchased this book because I could not explain, nor believe, that my Scandinavian ancestors lived and died on the far frontier without leaving much of a trace other than their children. This book explains where these people came from, how they lived and their place in American history. Although perhaps somewhat controversial, I can find no better explanation for the rapid, successful westward movement.
Wooden Purple Romeo
I ordered this for my husband and he's really enjoyed reading it.
Xava
What the initial reviewer fails to mention is the authors' fascinating premise -- that the predominant mid-Atlantic (read Pennsylvania) thrust of frontier expansion has at its roots the mingled culture of the southern Lenape Indians (aka Delaware) and the Savo-Karelian forest Finns who were encouraged to settle in the remote regions of western Sweden on the Norwegian border & who were no longer wanted with the rise of iron production making the Finns ideal candidates for New World colonisation. Their prior experience trading with the alien Rus'ian and Lapp peoples, their adaptation to forested frontier conditions including slash & burn agriculture, log building technology based on mastery of the felling ax, their early use & manufacture of the rifle as a hunting tool, their unconcern for environmental destruction, their readiness to incorporate useful new plant, animal, & survival knowlege & skills from other peoples, and their remarkable hardiness made them the core culture in the Philadelphia region upon which the bulk of subsequent immigrant populations, especially Celtic (Scots-Irish), Swiss, & German, were to learn the skills & knowlege necessary to move westward beyond the Alleghenies & southwestward along the Great Valley into Virginia, the Carolinas, & Georgia. The authors make a strong case for their hypothesis & compare it to earlier work by others. A fine & fascinating study of the roots of frontier American culture. The only weakness in my opinion is its insufficient analysis of the native American contribution to early mid-Atlantic colonial culture. Especially helpful would have been more information on log notching variations throughout the frontier on the order of the unparalleled study by Sigurd Erixon in 'Folk Liv' 1938 & on Finnish/Swedish vs. German rifle technology in the colonial period. Apart from this perhaps minor failing it constitutes a well-reasoned (if not fully substantiated) argument which will doubtless produce controversy & consternation (& perhaps even scorn) among cultural anthropologists specializing in American colonial history -- especially amongst those possessing Celtic and/or Germannic ancestry!!!
Delagamand
Terry G. Jordan and Matti Kaups studied America's frontier culture to discern its ethnic heritage. Most historians of the American frontier locate its origin in the vicinity of the Delaware Valley. In this book, Jordan and Kaups trace America's frontier culture to a surprising corner of Europe's "hard scrabble periphery." In the 1700s, about a century before Davy Crockett, residents of this corner of Europe depicted their frontiersmen fighting bears!

Jordan and Kaups consider evidence from literature, anthropology and architecture. The authors discussed the equipment carried by frontier hunters, the primitive and ecologically exahustive farming and homesteading techniques, the building of log cabins and even the notches in fence rails to trace the possible origin of American frontier culture.

Anyone interested in frontier or colonial history should consult this work, as should anyone studying the history of ethnic diversity and racism in North America. This book is a particularly good supplement to David Hackett Fischer's Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America, which considers localized seedbeds for four regional cultures. The authors repeatedly acknowledge the Indian contribution to the frontiersman's capability. The debt to Native America is clear. Sadly, the authors illuminate few particulars in this regard.

The scholarship is meticulous, the investigation fastidiously detailed. The authors were determined to prove their case; they have done so in a style that is both interesting and convincing.