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eBook Pedestals and Podiums: Utah Women, Religious Authority, and Equal Rights download

by Martha S. Bradley-Evans

eBook Pedestals and Podiums: Utah Women, Religious Authority, and Equal Rights download ISBN: 1560851899
Author: Martha S. Bradley-Evans
Publisher: Signature Books; 1 edition (October 18, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 584
ePub: 1212 kb
Fb2: 1353 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf txt mobi lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

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Pedestals and Podiums: U. Martha Sonntag Bradley is a professor in the College of Architecture and Planning and director of the Honors Program at the University of Utah, where she has received the Distinguished Teaching Award, the Student Choice Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Bennion Center Service Learning Professorship, and the honorary title of University Professor, 1999-2000.

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Bradley-Evans began teaching at the University of Utah in 1994 where she has spent most of her career. Pedestals and Podiums: Utah Women, Religious Authority, and Equal Rights (2005). She was awarded the Distinguished Teaching Award, the Bennion Center Service Learning Professorship, the University Professorship and the Student's Choice Award among other honors for her teaching. She was appointed the Dean of the Honors College at the University of Utah in 2002 and served in that position until 2011. Salt Lake City: Yesterday and Today (2010). Plural Wife: The Life Story of Mabel Finlayson Allred (2012).

Martha Bradley is an American educator and author Bradley-Evans received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Utah in 1974.

Martha Bradley is an American educator and author. She is a professor in the College of Architecture and Planning at the University of Utah. Bradley-Evans received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Utah in 1974. Thirteen years later she earned her Doctor of Philosophy degree from the same university. Also in 1981, Martha was given a Master of Arts degree from Brigham Young University.

Author Martha S. Bradley. Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2005. The story of the modern battle over the Equal Rights Amendment from its 1970 passage by Congress to its ultimate defeat in 1982 is an important one in the history of American women. Pedestals and Podiums: Utah Women, Religious Authority, and Equal Rights. It can be argued that, next to Phyllis Schlafly's Stop ERA movement, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints exhibited the strongest voice to defeat ratification.

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The LDS Woman's Exponent of the 1800s promoted, in its masthead, The Rights of the Women of All Nations.

book by Martha Sonntag Bradley. The LDS Woman's Exponent of the 1800s promoted, in its masthead, The Rights of the Women of All Nations. Almost from the beginning, the women s movement has been divided into two factions those wanting full equality with men (Susan B. Anthony, Alice Paul) and those seeking legal protections for women s particular needs (Julia Ward Howe, Eleanor Roosevelt).

Bradley-Evans is also the author of several books, and is known for her . Pedestals and Podiums: Utah Women, Religious Authority, and Equal.

Bradley-Evans is also the author of several books, and is known for her history of Mormon feminism. Martha Sonntag Bradley was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on June 18, 1951. She had three brothers Bradley-Evans married Robert Neldon Evans in 2002, although she had been previously married and had six children.

Download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd. Flag for inappropriate content. saveSave Martha Sonntag Bradley-Evans For Later. Bradley-Evans is also the author of several books, and is known for her history of Mormon feminism. The Church and Colonel Sanders": Mormon Standard Plan Architecture (1981) Sandy City: The First 100 Years (1993) Kidnapped From That Land: The Government Raids on the Short Creek Polygamist (1993). Mormon Frontier (2000) Pedestals and Podiums: Utah Women, Religious Authority, and Equal Rights (2005). Bradley-Evans married Robert Neldon Evans in 2002

Our Top Ten Books on Mormon History list was composed for someone new to Mormon History. Martha Bradley, Pedestals and Podiums: Utah Women, Religious Authority, and Equal Rights Release in December.

Our Top Ten Books on Mormon History list was composed for someone new to Mormon History. The criteria for inclusion are the book’s demonstration of: Use of a sophisticated academic approach and emphasis on analysis over merely regurgitating data and documents. Coverage of an important person, event, or period in Mormon history.

 Almost from the beginning, the women’s movement has been divided into two factions–those wanting full equality with men (Susan B. Anthony, Alice Paul) and those seeking legal protections for women’s particular needs (Julia Ward Howe, Eleanor Roosevelt). Early Utah leaders such as Relief Society President Emmeline B. Wells walked hand-in-hand with Anthony and other controversial reformers. However, by the 1970s, Mormons had undergone a significant ideological turn to the mainstream, championing women’s unique roles in home and church, and joined other conservatives in defeating the Equal Rights Amendment.

Looking back to the nineteenth century, how committed were Latter-day Saints of their day to women’s rights? LDS President Joseph F. Smith was particularly critical of women who “glory in their enthralled condition and who caress and fondle the very chains and manacles which fetter and enslave them!” The masthead of the church’s female Relief Society periodical,

Woman’s Exponent, proudly proclaimed “The Rights of the Women of Zion and the Rights of Women of All Nations!” In leading the LDS sisterhood, Wells said she gleaned inspiration from The Revolution,published by Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Fast-forward a century to 1972 and passage of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) by the United States Congress. Within a few years, the LDS Church, allied with Phyllis Schlafly, joined a coalition of the Religious Right and embarked on a campaign against ratification. This was a mostly grassroots campaign waged by thousands of men and women who believed they were engaged in a moral war and that the enemy was feminism itself.

Conjuring up images of unisex bathrooms, homosexuality, the dangers of women in the military, and the divine calling of stay-at-home motherhood—none of which were directly related to equal rights—the LDS campaign began in Utah at church headquarters but importantly was fought across the country in states that had not yet ratified the proposed amendment. In contrast to the enthusiastic partnership of Mormon women and suffragists of an earlier era, fourteen thousand women, the majority of them obedient, determined LDS foot soldiers responding to a call from their Relief Society leaders, attended the 1977 Utah International Women’s Year Conference in Salt Lake City. Their intent was to commandeer the proceedings if necessary to defeat the pro-ERA agenda of the National Commission on the International Women’s Year. Ironically, the conference organizers were mostly LDS women, who were nevertheless branded by their sisters as feminists.

In practice, the church risked much by standing up political action committees around the country and waging a seemingly all-or-nothing campaign. Its strategists, beginning with the dean of the church’s law school at BYU, feared the worst—some going so far as to suggest that the ERA might seriously compromise the church’s legal status and sovereignty of its all-male priesthood. In the wake of such horrors, a take-no-prisoners war of rhetoric and leafleteering raged across the country. In the end, the church exerted a significant, perhaps decisive, impact on the ERA’’s unexpected defeat.

Comments: (2)
Hanelynai
This book provides some great insights into the historical role of women within the LDS Church, and their struggle for relevance in their own right and not simply as an extension of the men in the Church. Looks at the ERA struggle, with the conclusion that while some progress has been made, there is still a long way to go for the Church to not only catch up with the rest of the civilized world, but also with the vision and promise laid out for women by the Church's founder, Joseph Smith over 150 years ago.
Brol
very very interesting. I love Utah and Mormon history because I lived in SLC and I loved it