carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Ghost Towns Alive: Trips to New Mexico's Past

eBook Ghost Towns Alive: Trips to New Mexico's Past download

by Pamela Porter,Linda G. Harris

eBook Ghost Towns Alive: Trips to New Mexico's Past download ISBN: 082632908X
Author: Pamela Porter,Linda G. Harris
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press; 1 edition (October 15, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1417 kb
Fb2: 1341 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: txt azw lrf doc
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

"Ghost Towns Alive" is a welcome addition to the travel literature on historic towns, dead or alive, of New Mexico.

"Ghost Towns Alive" is a welcome addition to the travel literature on historic towns, dead or alive, of New Mexico. Stay -at-homes will find this book a pleasure to own; travelers will find it indispensible while visiting New Mexico. Harris leads us through solid succinct history lessons as we tour each town. The photos in company are wonderful. Author Linda G. Harris and photographer Pamela Porter have divided the state into eleven regions comprising seventy ghost towns, from the Santa Fe Trail and Colfax County.

Ghost Towns Alive book.

A very good book on New Mexico ghost towns. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 13 years ago. Not only is this book a good guide to many of New Mexico's ghost towns, but it is also incredibly readable. Plus, it passes the one-question test I give to all New Mexico ghost town books: "Does it include Hagan?" Hagan, New Mexico-the greatest, most overlooked of all ghost towns anywhere. Many ghost town books just include all the obvious ones, like Shakespeare and Steins, but only the good ones know about Hagan.

Ghost Towns Alive: Trips To New Mexico's Past.

Linda G Harris; Pamela Porter. They have divided the state into eleven regions comprising seventy ghost towns, from the Santa Fe Trail and Colfax County in the north to the southern mountains and the boot heel at the other end of New Mexico.

Chloride, New Mexico. Harris, Linda G. (2003). Ghost Towns Alive: Trips to New Mexico's Past. Chloride is an unincorporated community in Sierra County, in the . YouTube Encyclopedic. p. 146. ISBN 978-0-8263-2908-0.

They have divided the state into eleven regions comprising seventy ghost towns, from the Santa Fe Trail and Colfax County in the north to the southern mountains and the boot heel at the other end of New Mexico. For this writing, Harris has redefined ghost town to refer not just to permanently abandoned places but also to those that have declined without necessarily dying

Harris, Linda G. This New Mexico state location article is a stub.

Harris, Linda G. 152.

The first book of the twenty-first century on New Mexico's ghost towns, this illustrated survey is based on research, interviews, and the travels of author Linda Harris and photographer Pamela Porter. They have divided the state into eleven regions comprising seventy ghost towns, from the Santa Fe Trail and Colfax County in the north to the southern mountains and the boot heel at the other end of New Mexico.

For this writing, Harris has redefined ghost town to refer not just to permanently abandoned places but also to those that have declined without necessarily dying. She sheds light on the ways some towns have survived and how some have reinvented themselves, like Madrid and Cerrillos, former mining towns turned artistic and bohemian enclaves.

All the towns in this book are accessible. Many have their own web sites and most have benefited from the efforts of preservation-minded residents and museum curators. Roads have been improved, churches restored, and schools have been transformed into community centers, libraries, or residences. Ghost Towns Alive will certainly entice New Mexicans and out-of-state tourists alike to pack a lunch and hit the road. Don't forget to bring walking shoes and your camera!

Comments: (7)
Varshav
I recently spent some time in New Mexico and dedicated a three day weekend to Ghost Towns and their Cemeteries. This book was an invaluable resource. It includes towns that are not completely deserted as most ghost towns are imagined by midwesterners like myself. Linda Harris includes contact information for some interesting locations and enough background information to help decide what to look for in more detail and what to just take some pictures of and move on. The result was meeting some very interesting individuals in the areas I visited and because I had some idea about the areas as described by the book, I could ask the questions that broke the ice and revealed the nature of each ghost town I visited.
Driving directions and tips are adequate but a GPS navigation device helped out occasionally when I wanted to get a little farther off the planned itinerary. A cooler full of water, a GPS, a good hat with wide brim and neck strap, a camera, and this book will result in an enjoyable adventure.
Perilanim
I really like this book. The author mentions if a town is on private property or difficult to drive to. Plus the history on the towns is interesting.
Molotok
Great collection of stories around ghost towns, few towns were omitted. The way they are grouped by location is very positive. Warning about crossing rivers or driving on rough roads was accurate in the places we tried to find.
JoldGold
nice book. Checked it out of the library. Ended up buying it used on Amazon.
Kelezel
Very interesting book. It contains a lot of NM history.
Blackworm
good book
Gardall
excellent book, worth the price just for the pictures
Great research on some towns but below mediocre on others. On towns the author didn't research well, she included a lot of dribble on the weather of the day she visited, her personal opinion of the town, landscape and people and even an issue with her car. At times the author's personal opinion was rude and offensive.

My coworkers and I read aloud from a handful of NM ghost town books while in the truck traveling to remote research sites. We enjoy the stories in this book the least. When we arrive to a new town and read from this book, the group groans and grumbles making predictions on what rude opinion this author will offer. It's always a surprise when we like her story. Our favorite NM ghost town book - Ghost towns and mining camps of NM, 1975, by James and Barbara Sherman. It has better pictures and stories and is exceptionally well researched.