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eBook Living Our Stories, Telling Our Truths: Autobiography and the Making of the African-American Intellectual Tradition download

by V. P. Franklin

eBook Living Our Stories, Telling Our Truths: Autobiography and the Making of the African-American Intellectual Tradition download ISBN: 0195103734
Author: V. P. Franklin
Publisher: Oxford University Press; First Printing edition (August 8, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 464
ePub: 1155 kb
Fb2: 1455 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf doc txt mbr
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Stories, Telling Our Truths V. P. Franklin reinterprets the lives and thought of twelve major black American .

Stories, Telling Our Truths V. Franklin reinterprets the lives and thought of twelve major black American writers and political leaders - including Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, W. E. B. Du Bois, James Baldwin, Malcolm X, Amiri Baraka, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Adam Clayton Powell, as well as now lesser known but equally crucial figures, among them Alexander Crummell, who declared black Americans . V. Franklin shows that autobiography occupies the central position in the African-American literary and intellectual tradition because "oftentimes personal truth was stranger than fiction.

reflections of leading African-American intellectuals, telling the truth about our condition in America. important literary genre in the African American intellectual tradition. Their wisdom, out of our past, counsels our present and guides our future.

Indiana Magazine of History.

In Living Our Stories, Telling Our Truths: Autobiography and the Making of the African American Intellectual . Many biographical studies of African American intellectuals have focused on the individual's commitment to telling the truth about Africa and people of African descent.

In Living Our Stories, Telling Our Truths: Autobiography and the Making of the African American Intellectual Tradition, V. Franklin used the life-writings of African American literary artists and political leaders to demonstrate that "race vindication" was a major activity for black intellectuals from the early nineteenth century.

Vincent P. Franklin, Living Our Stories, Telling Our Truths: Autobiography and the Making of the African-American . Franklin, Living Our Stories, Telling Our Truths: Autobiography and the Making of the African-American Intellectual Tradition (New York: Scribner and Sons. She discusses also the capacity of the African American oral tradition to preserve valuable aspects of culture from the time of slavery while simultaneously registering protest (xix); see Angela Davis, Blues Legacies and Black Feminism (New York: Pantheon Books, 1988). 59. Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, ‘You Must Remember This’: Autobiography as Social Critique, The Journal of American History Vol. 85, No. 2 (Sept.

As Franklin (History and Political Science/Drexel Univ. explains, autobiography has always been a powerful tool for people of African descent. He also performs a careful reading of The Autobiography of Malcolm X, but the best part of the book is his discussion of James Baldwin, in which he notes how Baldwin's dogged use of the first person in his essays, his willingness to expose himself, made his work so powerful.

P. Franklin is Professor of History at Drexel University in Philadelphia. Nancy L. Grant was Associate Professor of History at Washington University in St. Louis and the author of TVA and Black Americans: Planning for the Status Quo. Husband of the late Nancy Grant, Harold M. Kletnick is a Programmer/Analyst for Washington University in St. Louis

Pennington: African American Churchman and Abolitionist (1995) Donald M. Jacobs, e. Courage and Conscience: Black and White Abolitionists in Boston (1993) . Franklin, Telling Our Truths: Autobiography and the Making of the African American Intellectual Tradition (1995) Gary Collison, Shadrach Minkins: From Fugitive Slave to Citizen (1997) William M. Wiecek, The Sources of Anti-slavery Constitutionalism in America, 1760-1848.

Living Our Stories, Telling Our Truths: Autobiography and the Making of the African-American Intellectual Tradition, .

From the publication of the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave in 1845 to Lorene Cary's Black Ice and Brent Staples's Parallel Time: Growing Up in Black and White in the 1990s, the autobiography has been the most important literary genre in the African-American intellectual tradition. Whether used to clarify the nature of the relationship between ideology and personal experience or simply because "oftentimes personal truth was stranger than fiction," the autobiography fulfilled the need to define the individual "black self" to a society that denied the existence of black reality. In Living Our Stories, Telling Our Truths, V.P. Franklin provides the first comprehensive examination of African-American intellectual history in over twenty-five years, presenting original interpretations of the lives and thought of twelve major black American writers and political leaders who played a central role in this powerful literary genre. Focusing on the autobiographical works of such prominent figures as Zora Neale Hurston, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Malcolm X, Gwendolyn Brooks, and James Baldwin, as well as lesser known but equally crucial figures including Alexander Crummell, who declared black Americans a "chosen people" of the Lord, and Ida B. Wells-Barnett, the most famous black American woman at the turn of the century, Franklin shows that the need to tell the truth to authority, to document the original cultural contributions of rural and urban blacks, and to defend the interests of the black working class has always been a principal preoccupation of African-American intellectuals. The particular areas of the "race problem" that these individuals chose to focus on, however, were as varied as the times in which they wrote: from James Weldon Johnson's commitment to documenting the significant artistic and cultural contributions of African-Americans and James Baldwin's view that African-Americans were destined "to redeem the soul of America" to Malcolm X's rejection of integrationist doctrines and Harry Haywood's determination that the leadership of the Communist Party recognize the revolutionary potential of the black working class. And through it all, the objectives are strikingly similar--self-determination, "race vindication," and the struggle for freedom have all been at the core of the collective experience of African Americans in the United States. Given the negative evaluations of black culture and community coming from the larger white-dominated society, African-American intellectuals used their autobiographies to tell the truth about the nature of the black experience in this society and throughout the world. Providing personal accounts of what freedom meant and how it could be achieved, the autobiography allowed African-American intellectuals to use their personal experience as a mirror to reflect the larger social and political context for black America. A major contribution to American history, Living Our Stories, Telling Our Truths acknowledges this rich tradition and makes it clear that these works provide a vital intellectual legacy for African-Americans as they enter the twenty-first century.