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eBook My Folks Don't Want Me To Talk About Slavery: Personal Accounts of Slavery in North Carolina download

by Belinda Hurmence

eBook My Folks Don't Want Me To Talk About Slavery: Personal Accounts of Slavery in North Carolina download ISBN: 0895870398
Author: Belinda Hurmence
Publisher: Blair; 4th Printing edition (January 1, 1984)
Language: English
Pages: 103
ePub: 1672 kb
Fb2: 1967 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw docx mobi rtf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

More than 170 interviews were conducted in North Carolina.

More than 170 interviews were conducted in North Carolina. Belinda Hurmence pored over each Who could better describe what slavery was like than the people who experienced it? And describe it they did, in thousands of remarkable interviews sponsored by the Federal Writer's Project during the 1930's. More than 2000 slave narratives are now housed in the Library of Congress. More than 170 interviews were conducted in North Carolina.

More than 170 interviews were conducted in North Carolina

More than 170 interviews were conducted in North Carolina. Belinda Hurmence was born in Oklahoma, raised in Texas, and educated at the University of Texas and Columbia University. She has written several novels for young people, including Tough Tiffany (an ALA Notable Book), A Girl Called Boy (winner of the Parents' Choice Award), Tancy (winner of a Golden Kite Award), and The Nightwalker.

Belinda Hurmence was born in Oklahoma, raised in Texas, and educated at the University of Texas and Columbia University. She is the author of award-winning books for young people. My Folks Don't Want Me to Talk About Slavery. Discover ideas about Oral History

HS3S42: Slavery in America. Section: 1: Oral histories and interviews with ex-slaves.

HS3S42: Slavery in America. Next: We lived in a little cabin in the yard. Library availability.

John F. Blair; Winston-Salem, 1984. Bost Plenty of colored women have children by the white men.

com User, December 5, 2001.

Miss Hurmence has truly picked the best of the bunch of the North Carolina Narratives to use in this book. For one thing, there is a wide range here. com User, December 5, 2001. My Folks Don't Want Me To Talk About Slavery" is a book compiled of condensed life stories from former slaves who were still living in the 1930's. This is not a book of white people's interpretation of what slaves had to say, rather it is a collection of interviews of former slaves.

Slavery in North Carolina Books online at best prices in India by Belinda Hurmence from Bookswagon.

828 16% I Don't Want to Talk about ItBy: Kathryn Kunz FinneyRs. 599 25% I Don't Want to Talk about ItBy: Jeanie Franz RansomRs.

My Folks Don't Want Me to Talk about Slavery: Twenty-One Oral Histories of Former North Carolina Slaves. December 1st 1990 by John F. Blair Publisher (first August 1984). My Folks Don't Want Me to Talk about Slavery: Twenty-One Oral Histories of Former North Carolina Slaves.

Former slaves themselves―an important but long-neglected source of information about the institution of slavery in the United States. Who could better describe what slavery was like than the people who experienced it? And describe it they did, in thousands of remarkable interviews sponsored by the Federal Writers’ Project during the 1930s. More than 170 interviews were conducted in North Carolina. Belinda Hurmence pored over each of the North Carolina narratives, compiling and editing 21 of the first-person accounts for this collection.

Belinda Hurmence was born in Oklahoma, raised in Texas, and educated at the University of Texas and Columbia University. She has written several novels for young people, including Tough Tiffany (an ALA Notable Book), A Girl Called Boy (winner of the Parents' Choice Award), Tancy (winner of a Golden Kite Award), and The Nightwalker.

She has also edited We Lived in a Little Cabin in the Yard and Before Freedom, When I Just Can Remember, companion volumes to this book. She now lives in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Comments: (7)
Unsoo
This is real history, true accounts of the slave era by the slaves who lived through it. The former slaves in this book are forgiving people on the whole, people I would be proud to know were they alive today. Listen to their words--they speak of fear, very hard work, occasional joy and beatings. What stands out most is the courage of slaves, even while whites did their very best to take away slaves' humanity.

Taking someone's humanity sounds abstract, until you read of their treatment of slave children. One slaveholder fed all slave children from a trough, like pigs. One slaveholder brought the children up to the main house for one good meal a week--and gave them shells for spoons. The slaveholder also inspected children for illness, as if the children were livestock. This last slaveholder was accounted a good master.

Slavery is hard to talk about. Who wants to revisit the humiliation and pain inflicted upon your kin, even if it was your great-grandfather you never met? It's truly awful if some of your ancestors, as mine were, were slaveholders who might well have inflicted such horrors. To my surprise, I received a DNA test, which informed me that I had also had some few "Sub-Saharan" ancestors, as well as a few Native American ancestors I already knew about. There is also a fair chance that those Sub-Saharan (black) ancestors were slaves, also on the receiving end of those horrors. I only know my black ancestors from DNA, but my slaveholder ancestors were well documented.

America as a whole needs to look at slavery straight on, and stop trying to wiggle out of responsibility. This book can help, as can many other first person accounts of slavery.
Briciraz
In the 1930s, writers were sent out to find and interview former slaves. These men and women, who ranged in age from their late seventies to over a hundred, narrated their recollections of slave life before, during, and after the Civil War. Hundreds of stories were collected, and these became known as the Slave Narratives. This book is an excerpt from this vast collection. The former slaves, in straightforward, simple language, tell stories of relentless hard work, slave customs, cruel masters, kind masters, the horror of the auction block,everyday life in the Slave quarters, and the hardships that came with a freedom that they did not know how to navigate. These stories had me spellbound because it was, literally, living history -but a textbook. And the other facet that held my fascination was the fact that this happened not all that long ago.
Kabandis
Patsy Mitchner, age 84 said it all when interviewed on July 2, 1937 -- (just 27 days before I was born). She said " ...Slaves prayed for freedom. Then they got it and didn't know what to do with it. They was turned out with nowhere to go and nothing to live on. They had no experience in looking out for themselves, and nothing to work with, and no land ....".
Modred
Very interesting book. It was a fast read, but an amazing look into the past. It is both happy and sad, and even a little shocking.
Amazon "recommended" it. I would have not seeked it out on my own. Glad they prompted me to buy.
I gave it to my brother in law when I finished and it has now made it's way around the family. Please take time to read this. It is something I think all generations should read and discuss, no matter what your race.
Samut
There should be a movie made about all the wonderful people who lived through that terrible time in history. Their voices shall not be forgotten. Should be included in schools.
Sironynyr
The narratives were interesting; however, after reading the first five to ten, they became relatively repetitious. Perhaps the interviewers could have been a bit more creative in asking questions to give the readers a variety of the related subject...slavery.
Tto
One of the very best books I've read in a long time. I learned so much that I did not know about slavery....and I thought I was well informed. This is from the mouths of men and women who lived it.
I recommend any and all of the Slave narratives! What a treasure these are. I have read almost all of them and Im glad I purchased these books for Kindle. I treasure the voices from history.