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eBook Black slaves early freedmen of Hempstead County, Arkansas, 1819-1850 download

by Linda McDowell

eBook Black slaves  early freedmen of Hempstead County, Arkansas, 1819-1850 download ISBN: 0970533403
Author: Linda McDowell
Publisher: Jubilee, Inc (2000)
Language: English
Pages: 140
ePub: 1239 kb
Fb2: 1280 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf lrf azw lit
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

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Bernice Bennett welcomes Linda McDowell an archival assistant at the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies in Little Rock. She is a member of the Arkansas Historical Association and was recently elected to the board. She is also a member of the Garland County Historical Society, the Arkansas Genealogical Society (former board member and officer, 2000-2004), and the National Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society.

Black Slaves & Early Freedmen of Hempstead County, Arkansas 1819-1850. Freedmen’s Savings and Trust Signature Books. Little Rock: Jubilee, 2000. Patterson, Ruth Polk. The Seed of Sally Good’n: A Black Family of Arkansas 1833-1953. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 1985. Call Microfilm 709. Records for Washington on reels 4 and 5. These records are indexed by Freedman’s Bank Records. National Genealogical Society Quarterly 77:4 (December 1989).

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. Books by same authors: The Freedmen of the South. 10. The Darkest Minds.

Other freedmen were killed or driven from their land by Arkansas .

Other freedmen were killed or driven from their land by Arkansas Desperadoes that killed several Negroes. The agent reported 14 blacks had been killed in this incident, then said that another eight to ten had been killed by the same Desperadoes. The counties were required to provide transportation from the depots for the supplies.

Hempstead County ranked fifth in the slave-owning counties in Arkansas. Houston, Kelly E. Slaveholders and Slaves of Hempstead County, Arkansas. MA thesis, University of North Texas, 2008. Census for 1850 shows 296 owners and 2,394 slaves, not counting the slaves on the Red River plantations. Early Twentieth Century With the development of the automobile, good roads were in demand. In 1922, the road from Emmet to Fulton was improved as part of the Bankhead Highway, the first southern transcontinental highway. It ran on the north side of the Missouri-Pacific Railroad. Journal of the Hempstead County Historical Society.

Hempstead County, Arkansas Courthouse Records. Hempstead County, AR Courthouse.

Hempstead County is a county located in the . The county is named for Edward Hempstead, a delegate to the . As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,609. The county seat is Hope. Hempstead County is Arkansas's fourth county, formed on December 15, 1818, alongside Clark and Pulaski counties. Congress from the Missouri Territory, which included present-day Arkansas at the time. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county.

SLAVEHOLDERS AND SLAVES OF HEMPSTEAD COUNTY, ARKANSAS Kelly E. Houston, . A largely quantitative view of the institution of slavery in Hempstead County, Arkansas, this work does not describe the everyday lives of slaveholders and slaves. Thesis Prepared for the Degree of MASTER OF ARTS. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS May 2008. Chapters examine the origins, expansion, economics, and demise of slavery in the county. Slavery was established as an important institution in Hempstead County at an early date.