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eBook How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky From Daniel Boone to Henry Clay download

by Professor Stephen Aron

eBook How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky From Daniel Boone to Henry Clay download ISBN: 080185296X
Author: Professor Stephen Aron
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press (July 8, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1642 kb
Fb2: 1510 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: rtf txt mobi lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Not a story of paradise lost, this is a book about possibilities lost.

Not a story of paradise lost, this is a book about possibilities lost. It focuses on the common ground between Indians and backcountry settlers which was not found, the frontier customs that were not perpetuated, the lands that were not distributed equally, the slaves who were not emancipated, the agrarian democracy that was not achieved, and the millennium that did not arrive. Seeking to explain why these dreams were not realized, Stephen Aron shows us what did happen during Kentucky's tumultuous passage from Daniel Boone's world to Henry Clay's.

Historian Stephen Aron charts these missed opportunities in his early history of Kentucky-How the West Was . Henry Clay, on the other hand, moved to Kentucky to pursue his commercial and manufacturing interests, and set up a plantation outside of Lexington.

Historian Stephen Aron charts these missed opportunities in his early history of Kentucky-How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky from Daniel Boom to Henry Clay. Aron is particularly interested in the transformation of Kentucky from a hunter’s paradise to a ng and agricultural center. Aron uses this In his book How the West Was Lost, Stephen Aron explains the transformation of Kentucky during the lives of Daniel Boone and Henry Clay.

The publication of How the West was Lost moves Stephen Aron, currently a professor at UCLA, into the front ranks .

The publication of How the West was Lost moves Stephen Aron, currently a professor at UCLA, into the front ranks of contemporary American historians. Although specific to the early years of Kentucky, from its founding in the 1760's and 1770's by Daniel Boone and his pioneer cohorts, to the mercantile slave owning state overseen by Henry Clay in the early to mid 1800's, the author presents a story that seems like a parable of the conflict, between the public good and the ascendancy of. a litigious economic upper class, that is both timely and familiar.

The Transformation of Kentucky From Daniel Boone to Henry Clay. Not a story of paradise lost, this is a book about possibilities lost.

Eighteenth-century Kentucky was a place where Indian and European cultures collided-and, surprisingly, coincided. How the West Was Lost tracks the overlapping conquest, colonization, and consolidation of the trans-Appalachian frontier. Not a story of paradise lost, this is a book about possibilities lost

How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky from Daniel Boone to Henry Clay by Stephen Aron. Indiana Magazine of History. The book shatters customary generic boundaries to incorporate insights from many types of history-social, political, economic, ethnohistory, women's history, religious history, even the 'new' western history.

Aron, Stephen (1999). How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky from Daniel Boone to Henry Clay. Johns Hopkins University Press. php?title Gasper River&oldid 927021865". Categories: Rivers of Kentucky. Bodies of water of Warren County, Kentucky. Bodies of water of Logan County, Kentucky.

"A first-rate piece of work and a fine read." -- Alan Taylor, University of California, Davis

"This excellent history of early Kentucky resonates with the most important questions in the history of the early republic, frontier, and economic development. One of the book's great strengths is its 'genre-busting' quality, taking up ethnohistory and settlement history in the same narrative." -- John Mack Faragher, Yale University

Eighteenth-century Kentucky was a place where Indian and European cultures collided -- and, surprisingly, coincided. But this mixed world did not last, and it eventually gave way to nineteenth-century commercial and industrial development. How the West Was Lost tracks the overlapping conquest, colonization, and consolidation of the trans-Appalachian frontier. Not a story of paradise lost, this is a book about possibilities lost. It focuses on the common ground between Indians and backcountry settlers which was not found, the frontier customs that were not perpetuated, the lands that were not distributed equally, the slaves who were not emancipated, the agrarian democracy that was not achieved, and the millennium that did not arrive. Seeking to explain why these dreams were not realized, Stephen Aron shows us what did happen during Kentucky's tumultuous passage from Daniel Boone's world to Henry Clay's.

Comments: (4)
Niwield
Really interesting book. Great if you're studying early settlement of Kentucky especially.
Zodama
Although specific to the early years of Kentucky, from its founding in the 1760's and 1770's by Daniel Boone and his pioneer cohorts, to the mercantile slave owning state overseen by Henry Clay in the early to mid 1800's, the author presents a story that seems like a parable of the conflict, between the public good and the ascendancy of a litigious economic upper class, that is both timely and familiar. The sweat and blood of the first settlers are seen to have been practically for naught as the defeat of the native American Indians only paved the way for actions that made legal access to land all but out of reach for the common man. Daniel Boone himself was seen to have judged clear title to any of the lands that he pioneered so difficult to obtain that he left Kentucky for Missouri.

Collusion between various moneyed interests (banks included) and real estate speculation and bubbles make the problems of early Kentucky seem strangely similar to those that we experience today. The role and evolution of evangelism are also explored, starting with the "Great Awakening" of the early 1800s. It is interesting to read that in those days born-again religion was seen as a democratizing popular movement. Part of the appeal of this new religious movement is that it was identified as standing apart from the deism exposed by the landed Bluegrass gentry and the city of Lexington.
Doomredeemer
This was assigned reading in my Kentucky History class. It covers the founding and settlement of Kentucky. What makes the book is the brief glimpses it gives of the Forgotten Kentuckies:
-- Free Kentucky. When the land was a giant game reserve for Native Americans, full of trees and animals, but devoid of people. Where the buffalo literally roamed until white hunters brought about their extinction in just a matter of a few years.
-- Pioneer Kentucky. When small families lived in the middle of nowhere, battling Mother Nature and Indians. A world where some Native American tribes tried to assimilate captured white settlers, and some missionaries tried to lead converted Indians.
-- Chaotic Kentucky. When the lawyers and land speculators showed up, driving free-thinking spirits such as Daniel Boone away.
-- the Bluegrass Era of Henry Clay. When wild Kentucky transformed into a mini version of the Old Dominion with its slavery and aristocratic living.
-- Outlaw Kentucky. When the Green River and other parts of the state tried and failed to rebel against the establishment.
-- The Great Revival. When evengelical religious fervor swept the state, bringing the Shakers among others.
All in all, there's a little something here for everybody. It can be read on many levels. As an account of early Kentucky, a look at the worlds of Daniel Boone and Henry Clay, a case study on frontier expansion, or for just pure enjoyment.
Nanecele
I just read the Daniel Boone part. Not bad, but it is the usual PC slop with an intellectual spin. The usual "Indians were the victims" stuff when the reality is far from that. I'm not going to waste my time writing 50 pages to prove my point. Go out and do your own research. The 80 or so pages I read of this book was about 1% of my research and it didn't change my mind about Indians a bit. Read "The Frontiersmen" (5++ stars). Eckert loves the Indians, but despite all of his efforts to paint them in a good light, and his membership in the Tecumseh cult, the truth shined brightly through.