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eBook Coyotes I Have Known download

by John Duncklee

eBook Coyotes I Have Known download ISBN: 0816516111
Author: John Duncklee
Publisher: University of Arizona Press; First Edition, First Printing edition (April 1, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 150
ePub: 1827 kb
Fb2: 1906 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: rtf mbr azw txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Coyotes I Have Known has been added to your Cart. Mr. Duncklee draws some profound and useful life lessons from his experiences at the end of the book that I think would be worthwhile for everybody to read and understand.

Coyotes I Have Known has been added to your Cart. But if horses, cattle, cowboys, vaqueros, and desert don't interest you at all - well, you could probably take a miss on this one, because I doubt you'd read it to the end where the good stuff is.

Coyotes I Have Known book.

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Coyotes I Have Known by John Duncklee. Photograph: Aurum Press.

Sat 30 Aug 2008 0. 1 BST First published on Sat 30 Aug 2008 0. 1 BST. After the Orgy: Towards a Politics of Exhaustion by Dominic Pettman. Coyotes I Have Known by John Duncklee.

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John Duncklee has written: 'Good years for the buzzards' - subject- s -: Ranch life, Ranchers, Biography. Coyotes I have known' - subject- s -: Ranch life, Ranchers, Biography. Manchado y Sus Amigos, Manchado and His Friends'. Genevieve of Tombstone'. Manchado and His Friends Manchado y Sus Amigos'

John Duncklee's short stories examine men and women from the Spanish Colonial era to the twentieth-century American West. Men in "The Developers" and "Padre Mirandi" face similar problems, although they live centuries apart.

John Duncklee's short stories examine men and women from the Spanish Colonial era to the twentieth-century American West. Each suffers from human weaknesses and failings and affairs that end with surprise pregnancies. John Duncklee's short stories examine men and women from the Spanish Colonial era to the twentieth-century American West.

I knew that with any quick or suspicious movement of mine they could drift into invisibility. Now I had a token responsibility for two live and healthy coyotes. In the delicate world of relationships, we are tied together for all time. I opened two cans of dog food and left them as a votive. With the most casual slowness I reached down my new rifle from its sling over my bed-the. 222 with its bitter little high-speed, long-range stings. Very slowly I brought the rifle up. Perhaps in the shade of my house I was half hidden by the blinding light outside. The little rifle has a beautiful telescope sight with a wide field. The coyotes had not moved.

Novice rancher John Duncklee saw his share of buzzards during the 1950s while husbanding a herd of cattle through Arizona's worst drought in 400 years, and he told the story of those days in the captivating book Good Years for the Buzzards. Duncklee spent the next few years buying Mexican steers in Sonora, farming in the Santa Cruz Valley, and raising quarter horses on a small ranch near Nogales, Arizona. During that time he found that he had to cope with a different kind of creature.Duncklee discovered that most of the people he met were honest and easy to do business with; but he also discovered coyotes--people who weren't necessarily con artists but who were sly and cunning like their canine counterparts and who needed to be dealt with accordingly. Human coyotes, Duncklee learned, can be great company, but transacting business with them can be risky.Coyotes I Have Known recounts Duncklee's life during the early 1960s while he lived and worked along the United States-Mexico border. It introduces the people he encountered from both cultures and describes the many problems he faced in the livestock business--particularly in exporting Mexican steers to the United States. "The world of business seems to teem with coyotes," he writes, and he observes that his naiveté and idealism often made him easy prey for such a person, "who often appears when least expected."Duncklee's book recalls life along the border in a time that, while fairly recent, has already vanished. Maquiladoras, illegal immigration, drug trafficking, and economic problems have all had an impact on Sonora and have become major influences in changing the way of life in southern Arizona as well. Fortunately for today's readers, Duncklee has captured both the romance and the grittiness of western life as experienced not long ago.
Comments: (2)
Danial
This is an interesting tale of real ranching life on the Mexican/U.S. border in the 1960's. If you are interested in ranching, cowboys, or this part of the country the book will be very interesting. Even if you love cowboy tales like I do, it does bog down a little here and there. Mr. Duncklee draws some profound and useful life lessons from his experiences at the end of the book that I think would be worthwhile for everybody to read and understand. But if horses, cattle, cowboys, vaqueros, and desert don't interest you at all - well, you could probably take a miss on this one, because I doubt you'd read it to the end where the good stuff is. I enjoyed it, I'm pretty sure not everyone would. But you might oughta read it anyhow.
Throw her heart
...because that's what you'll get. I've met John Duncklee and he's a charismatic cowboy who's lived more in his life than three men could fit in their's. His charm and sincerity translates on the page to weave a gripping narative of his experiences and revelations as he struggles to make a fortune doing what he loves, roping and wrangling. While the book is educational and engaging on the subject of ranching, herding, and spotting a cheat, it tends to lose the audience if they're not already absolutely fascinated with those subjects.
No one could write about being a modern cowboy better than John Dunklee, but the reader must be in love with cowboys.