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eBook Salt Desert Trails download

by Peter Delafosse,Charles Kelly

eBook Salt Desert Trails download ISBN: 0914740377
Author: Peter Delafosse,Charles Kelly
Publisher: Western Epics (June 30, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 200
ePub: 1748 kb
Fb2: 1658 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc lrf txt rtf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

First published in 1930, Salt Desert Trails tells the story of the Great Salt Desert crossings by early explorers and emigrant parties. The 1969 version of "Salt Desert Trails" has been my guidebook to this region for many years. One copy at home, and another in my Jeep

First published in 1930, Salt Desert Trails tells the story of the Great Salt Desert crossings by early explorers and emigrant parties. Central to the story is the opening of the Hastings Cutoff in 1846. One copy at home, and another in my Jeep. This book is outstanding.

Salt Desert Trails book. First published in 1930, Salt Desert Trails tells the story of the Great Salt Desert crossings by early explorers and emigrant parties. Salt Desert Trails: A History of the Hastings Cutoff and Other Early Trails Which Crossed the Great Salt Desert Seeking a Shorter Road to California. 0914740377 (ISBN13: 9780914740377).

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First published in 1930, Salt Desert Trails tells the story of the Great Salt Desert crossings by early explorers and emigrant parties. Central to the story is the opening of the Hastings Cutoff in 1846, which led to the tragedy of the Donner Party and the pioneering of the emigrant trails through Utah’s Wasatch Mountains.

DeLafosse, Peter . e. ed. Trailing the Pioneers: A Guide to Utah's Emigrant Trails, 1829–1869. Utah State University Press, 1994. Salt Lake City: Western Epics, 1996. Korns, J. Roderic, and Dale L. Morgan, eds.

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Several small mountain ranges criss cross through the edges of the desert, such as the Cedar Mountains, Lakeside Mountains, Silver Island Mountains, Hogup Mountains, Grassy Mountains, and Newfoundland Mountains

The Salt Desert is the floor of what was once the larger half of the Salt Lake, into which no stream flows. Ken Sanders Rare Books is a member of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America.

The Salt Desert is the floor of what was once the larger half of the Salt Lake, into which no stream flows. Evaporation has removed the surface water, leaving only a great level expanse of mud and salt. No vegetation grows upon its surface, no fresh water enters it, and as far as the eye can see there is nothing but the apparently illimitable expanse of salt-plain. We guarantee every item we sell. All items are returnable within ten days in same condition sold.

Последние твиты от Peter Delafosse ( 89). Web developer, Gamer and ndonFC supporter. Peter Delafosse Ретвитнул(а) Athletic Bookworm (Looks brilliant mate, well done. 8. eter Delafosse добавил(а), Athletic Bookworm estNerd. My parents recently celebrated their 40th anniversary, so I had a crack at creating a coloured version of their wedding photo.

Charles Kelly (Introduction by Charles Kelly). Find signed collectible books: 'Salt Desert Trails'. used books, rare books and new books. Find all books by 'Charles Kelly' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Charles Kelly'. Gunshots in Another Room: The Forgotten Life of Dan J. Marlowe. The Outlaw Trail: Butch Cassidy and the Wild Bunch.

First published in 1930, Salt Desert Trails tells the story of the Great Salt Desert crossings by early explorers and emigrant parties. Central to the story is the opening of the Hastings Cutoff in 1846, which led to the tragedy of the Donner Party and the pioneering of the emigrant trails through Utah’s Wasatch Mountains.
Comments: (3)
Arihelm
Arrived on time and was exactly as described.
Andromajurus
I live in the remote desert of northwestern Utah.
The 1969 version of "Salt Desert Trails" has been my guidebook to this region for many years. One copy at home, and another in my Jeep.
This book is outstanding. Many of the places visited in 1929 or 1930 have changed little or not at all, nor are they likely to change much. Lack of water stifles any attempts at settlement or "modernization."
I only recently learned of this 1996 version, which I'm told is significantly updated. I'm ordering it to replace my 1969 versions.
Other good books about this area of Utah, Nevada and Idaho are:

"Ghosts of the Glory Trail" by Nell Murbarger. This 1956 book is long out of print, but worth finding. It is a collection of articles about 275 ghost towns, and the people she met along the way, over the course of 30 years. These articles were published in magazines and newspapers throughout the West. It contains an excellent index and many fine maps and photos.
Though dated, it offers solid history and gripping narrative.

"Pioneering the West, 1846 to 1878" by Major Howard Egan. First published in 1917 by the Egan family, this diary of Major Howard Egan remains in print. Major Egan was a Mormon pioneer, Pony Express rider, rancher, explorer, friend to local Indians (he spoke the native language and dealt with them fairly), keen observer and fine writer.
This book also has an honored place in my Jeep. Alas, the 1917 edition I have has no index, but perhaps later editions do.

Back on topic, "Salt Desert Trails" is the go-to book to have if you wish to explore the West Desert of northwestern Utah, southern Idaho and eastern Nevada. Without it, you'll easily drive by historically significant places and miss the fascinating stories the desert still offers.
Negal
During the period from the mid 1840s to 1869, emigration across the Great Plains from the Missouri to Oregon and California was undertaken by thousands of emigrants from all walks of life and for all kinds of reasons. The suffering they endured was indescribable.

In the early days, there was no fixed route and the emigrants were in the hands of guides who promised, for a fee of $10 per waggon, to guide them along the way. Many routes were used. Some were well-worn, others perfunctorily surveyed, and yet others were based on mere guesswork.

In 1845, one of the guides, by the name of Lansford Hastings, wrote a guide book entitled "The Emigrants' Guide to Oregon and California". This sold like wildfire back east, and inspired a wave of discontented Americans to sell up and head west, following the route he described in his book.

Calling Hastings a guide is however a misnomer. He'd travelled across the USA in an emigrant train in 1842, but to Oregon, not California. And while the route to California which he was selling was probably the shortest in distance, it took the emigrants across some of the roughest country they could possibly encounter, and then right across the barren Great Salt Desert. The emigrants who followed what became known as the Hastings Cut-off suffered disaster after disaster, and the trek across the desert ended up to be the ruin of many.

In his book, Kelly recounts the stories of some of the parties who crossed the Salt Desert, including that of the legendary Donner party, and the dreadful disasters that befell them. He includes a lengthy account of a drive across the desert that he undertook in 1929 following the still-visible trail of the emigrants. There are fascinating photographs that he took, and absorbing interviews with some of the ancient pioneers who had occupied the fertile parts of the land when the emigrant trail was still fresh and littered with the abandoned belongings of those who had come to grief.

It's clear from the book that he has a fascination with the fate of the Donner Party, and devotes a great deal of his time to their journey. Much of the account of his own journey across the desert is concerned with looking for artefacts connected with their plight as they abandon their belongings in the desperate struggle towards water. His delight is overwhelming when he finally identifies the remains of the Reed family's "Pioneer Palace Car", abandoned in the desert when the oxen escape.

But herein lies the rub. There is a great deal of contemporary evidence for the abandonment of the Reed's family waggon, but when the Reed diary was eventually published in 1947, it clearly states that Reed borrowed a team of oxen from another group of pioneers and went back a few days later to recover the wagon. In any case, there's no contemporary evidence to suggest that the Pioneer Palace Car was anything like as large as more modern sources suggest and as large as the remains that Kelly found.

Now of course it's all very well saying that a 1929 book won't normally contain any evidence that wasn't published until 1947. However, in the 1969 revision, Kelly quotes extensively from Reed's diary, including the passage where Reed returns to rescue his waggon, yet makes absolutely no revision to any of his conclusions.

Kelly is an excellent historian who has written a considerable number of books on pioneer life in the Utah area. He has made a valuable contribution to our knowledge of the conditions of that era and before his death, donated all his notes and photographs to the Utah State Historical Society. His crucial importance should not be overlooked. Yet it's his rather cavalier approach that casts a great deal of suspicion over the thoroughness of his work. It's as if he has already drawn his conclusions and is looking for facts to back them up rather than examining the facts first and then drawing the conclusions.

Factually, it's doubtful if there's much on this subject that is better-written than Kelly's account of life on the Great Salt Desert. On that score alone, there's every reason to buy this book. Just be very wary about jumping to the same conclusions that Kelly does, without having read any other material on the subject.