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eBook Twilight of Progressivism: The Western Republican Senators and the New Deal (The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science) download

by Professor Ronald Feinman

eBook Twilight of Progressivism: The Western Republican Senators and the New Deal (The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science) download ISBN: 0801823730
Author: Professor Ronald Feinman
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press; First Edition edition (January 1, 1981)
Language: English
Pages: 280
ePub: 1141 kb
Fb2: 1270 kb
Rating: 4.3
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Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

The author laments that it was the very independence that led the Senators to split with their party in 1932 that also prevented them from uniting as a solid and lasting voting block.

The author laments that it was the very independence that led the Senators to split with their party in 1932 that also prevented them from uniting as a solid and lasting voting block. Furthermore, Roosevelt's decision not to support progressive Republican, Bronson Cutting in his reelection bid, the Court Packing controversy, and isolationist sentiment on the eve of World War II divided the Senators in their support for the Administration, as well as for each other.

Twilight of Progressivism book. Hardcover, 280 pages. Published January 1st 1981 by Johns Hopkins University Press. Start by marking Twilight of Progressivism: The Western Republican Senators and the New Deal as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Twilight of Progressivism: The Western Republican Senators and the New Deal (The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science). 0801823730 (ISBN13: 9780801823732).

Progressivism : The Western Republican Senators and the New Deal. Release Date: October 1993. Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press.

book by Ronald L. Feinman. Twilight of Progressivism : The Western Republican Senators and the New Deal. by Ronald L.

v. 2. Methods of historical study, The past and the present of political . Methods of historical study, The past and the present of political economy, Samuel Adams, the man of the town meeting, Taxation in the United States, Institutional beginnings in a western state, Indian money as a factor in New England civilization, Town and county government in the English colonies of North America, Rudimentary society among boys, Land laws of mining .

Volume 56 Issue 2: east asian business history  . Published online by Cambridge University Press: 11 June 2012.

Volume 56 Issue 2: east asian business history English Français. Export citation Request permission. Recommend this journal.

Twilight of Progressivism: The Western Republican Senators and the New Deal by Ronald L. Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher.

com and the author of two books: - Twilight of Progressivism: The Western Republican Senators and the New Deal (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1981) - Assassinations, Threats and the American Presidency: From Andrew Jackson to Barack Obama (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015). Dr. Feinman studied under Professor Arthur Schlesinger, Jr, Pulitzer Prize winning historian, and sponsor of his dissertation, who was Albert Schweitzer Professor of the Humanities at the CUNY Graduate Center from 1966-1993.

Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006. al world that is revealed in the book. Here other studies may help, and indeed. In his most recent work. Purity Lost, Stephen A. Epstein, a specialist in the eco-. Epstein's Purity Lost joins an existing body of literature that deals with bound-. Zemon Davis's narrative of Leo Africanus [Trickster's Travels: A Sixteenth.

Ronald L. Feinman, Twilight of Progressivism: The Western Republican Senators and the New Deal (Johns Hopkins University Press: Baltimore, 1981), pp. 68–73

Ronald L. 68–73. For business frustration and intra-industry tensions in industries which did want to see the NRA approach abandoned entirely see Galambos, Competition and Cooperation, pp. 227–79, Johnson, The Politics of Soft Coal, pp. 195–216,Google Scholar. For complete business disenchantment with the benefits of government regulation see Fine, The Automobile under the Blue Eagle, pp. 141, 410–16, andGoogle Scholar. Feinman received his P. from the City University of New York Graduate School in 1975. In addition to this blog, Dr. Feinman has blogged at sor

Book by Feinman, Professor Ronald
Comments: (2)
Vertokini
For those who are unfamiliar with the intricacies of mid-20th century liberalism, it may come as a surprise to learn that a group of self-styled "progressive" members of the GOP initially championed some aspects of the New Deal. In this clearly written and straightforward account, Ronald Feinman explores the personalities and policies of a group of Republican senators in the West and Midwest--among them were Peter Norbeck of South Dakota; George Norris of Nebraska; Hiram Johnson of California; Bob La Follette, Jr. of Wisconsin; Henrik Shipstead of Minnesota; Charles McNary of Oregon; Gerald Nye of North Dakota; and William Borah of Idaho. These senators rejected the pro-business conservatism and laissez-faire individualism of Herbert Hoover in favor of public ownership of utilities, public works, veterans' pensions, unemployment insurance, and above all, support for the agricultural interests that dominated the areas they represented. Students of early American history may recognize the anti-monopolist thrust of these senators as fundamentally Jeffersonian in character. Teachers and professors of the US survey course may have some passing familiarity with Johnson for his contributions to Progressive Era California; with the famous Wisconsinite, "Fighting Bob" La Follette, the father of the character showcased here; with McNary for a piece of agricultural legislation that bore his name; and with Nye from his famous mid-1930s committee report that exposed the economic and corporate interests (including GM and DuPont) that partially contributed to US entrance into WWI. As such, Feinman shows readers how Nye and his fellow progressive Republicans remained staunch isolationists on matters of foreign policy, even as the US and Europe careened toward a second, devastating world war. This viewpoint placed them at odds with FDR during the latter part of the 1930s and made them unpopular in circles that advocated for international treaties and cooperation.

Feinman, a protege of the unabashed New Dealer and prolific historian, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., has grounded his conclusions in extensive archival research conducted in New York, California, Washington DC, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, Missouri, and other locales. Contemporary newspapers and periodicals, congressional debates, and oral history interviews round out his assortment of primary sources. Straightforward and entirely devoid of highfalutin jargon, this book defies the so-called "cultural turn" then pervading the academy (and wisely so). Feinman is at his best when demonstrating the complex motivations and beliefs of these progressive Republicans. At times, they are hard to pin down as they didn't always vote as a bloc. Their influence, as Feinman argues, seems to have peaked in Roosevelt's first term, when many of them supported aspects of the so-called "First New Deal." They gravitated away from FDR and often joined conservative opponents of the New Deal when the president proposed his "court-packing" scheme as a response to the recalcitrant, pro-business members of the Supreme Court, who were consistently striking down New Deal legislation as unconstitutional based on their stubbornly narrow reading of the Constitution's commerce clause. Critics looking for an example of academic history that proves irrelevant and inaccessible to a lay public should look elsewhere. One need not hold an advanced degree to understand this book. Fans of political history, in particular, will find this book enjoyable and illuminating.
Wrathshaper
Ronald Feinman masterfully depicts the successes and shortcomings of Western progressive Republicans as they sought to influence New Deal policy. Drawing from interviews and personal correspondence with political leaders of the 1930s, such as Gerald Nye, Burton Wheeler, and James Farley, Feinman offers a unique perspective of the decision by several Republicans to break party lines in 1932 to support Franklin Roosevelt, and once elected, press the administration toward progressive policies in utilities, labor, antitrust, and conservation. The author laments that it was the very independence that led the Senators to split with their party in 1932 that also prevented them from uniting as a solid and lasting voting block. Furthermore, Roosevelt's decision not to support progressive Republican, Bronson Cutting in his reelection bid, the Court Packing controversy, and isolationist sentiment on the eve of World War II divided the Senators in their support for the Administration, as well as for each other. Published in 1981, Twilight of Progressivism remains highly relevant today in telling the unique story of independent Western Republicans who sought to influence and craft New Deal legislation. Anyone interested in twentieth century political history will benefit from this well written and informative account of Republicans in the Theodore Roosevelt tradition and their role in reforming American politics and economics during The Great Depression.