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eBook Fighting Sail on Lake Huron and Georgian Bay: The War of 1812 and Its Aftermath download

by Barry M. Gough

eBook Fighting Sail on Lake Huron and Georgian Bay: The War of 1812 and Its Aftermath download ISBN: 1557503141
Author: Barry M. Gough
Publisher: Naval Inst Pr; 2nd prt. edition (August 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 215
ePub: 1425 kb
Fb2: 1435 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lit rtf mobi lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Canadian Barry Gough's new work makes an important and long-awaited contribution to our understanding of the struggle for domination in the Upper Great Lakes and the American heartland during the War of 1812.

Canadian Barry Gough's new work makes an important and long-awaited contribution to our understanding of the struggle for domination in the Upper Great Lakes and the American heartland during the War of 1812. A critical time for both the old northwest and the peoples who lived along the .

Fighting Sail on Lake Huron and Georgian Bay: The War of 1812 and its Aftermath. Naval Institute Press/Vanwell Publishing. ISBN 978-1-55750-314-5. Gough, Barry (2016) "Writing a Canadian High School History of the Great War: Victoria High School: Challenges, Pitfalls, and Sources," Canadian Military History 25, Issue 1, article 13; retrieved 2016-10-21. Meares Island case Moses Martin et al. v. . the Queen et al. specified in keynote intro, . Studies Conference, New Westminster, . 2–4 May 2013; retrieved 2013-05-01 Archived 2 July 2013 at the Wayback Machine here].

Canadian Barry Gough's new work makes an important and long-awaited contribution to our understanding of the struggle for domination in the Upper Great Lakes an.com User, September 12, 2003

Canadian Barry Gough's new work makes an important and long-awaited contribution to our understanding of the struggle for domination in the Upper Great Lakes an.com User, September 12, 2003. The extent of sea power on the interior Great Lakes, the ebb and flow of the fighting around and thereon, and how the struggle between the Americans and British ultimately shaped the boundaries of the USA and Canada, are dramtically captured in Barry Gough's excellent work. Fighting Sail on Lake Huron and Georgian Bay" ably presents the little-known campaign.

The Journal of American History, (September), p. 24. Kevin Crisman.

Lake Huron, North America. Georgian Bay, Ontario, Canada. War of 1812 (18121815). Disambiguation notice.

Fighting Sail on Lake Huron and Georgian Bay: The War of 1812 and Its Aftermath -by Barry Gough -Signed Twice Gough, Barry (signed twice) Published by St Catharines, ON: Vanwell Publishing, 2002, 1st. SECRETS FROM A WAR 0F 1812 CEMETERY Death at Snake Hill Ontario. Incredible war of 1812 book by. ackay Hitsman. Windsor Region10/09/2019. Britain, Canada and the North Pacific: Maritime Enterprise and Dominion, 1778–1914. As with my previous writings on the War of 1812, this book owes much to the senior seminar in History at Wilfrid Laurier University that put period documents under the microscope, so to speak, with surprising new yields. This document collection will be found among my archives at Wilfrid Laurier University. Through Water, Ice and Fire: Schooner Nancy of the War of 1812. Dundurn Press Ltd. 2006. ISBN 978-1-55002-569-9. Case reference retrieved 2011-03-01 at here.

Canadian Barry Gough's new work makes an important and long-awaited contribution to our understanding of the struggle for domination in the Upper Great Lakes and the American heartland during the War of 1812. A critical time for both the old northwest and the peoples who lived along the U.S.-Canadian border, it was also a time when the territories that became Wisconsin and Minnesota were formed, the fur trade was established, and the Indian nations attempted to preserve both their homeland and their independence. It is a unique study in that it goes far beyond the Battle of Lake Erie, where traditional historical accounts end, adding new chapters to the history of Detroit and Michilimackinac.

This comprehensive, chronological account exposes the reader not only to the naval and territorial consequences of the era but also to the plight along the way. It is the story of shipbuilding, of the limits of sea power, and of the men and women who succeeded in traversing unknown water and land. The author details such events as Commodore Arthur Sinclair's disastrous U.S. naval expedition to Lake Huron and Georgian Bay in 1814 and describes how British forces captured unsuspecting U.S. naval schooners. Supplemented with excellent maps and illustrations, the text also provides information about hydrographic surveying and the search for useful naval bases. This book will appeal to everyone interested in the age of fighting sail, Native American history, and early American naval pursuits.