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eBook The United States, Great Britain, and Egypt, 1945-1956: Strategy and Diplomacy in the Early Cold War download

by Peter L. Hahn

eBook The United States, Great Britain, and Egypt, 1945-1956: Strategy and Diplomacy in the Early Cold War download ISBN: 0807856096
Author: Peter L. Hahn
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (August 31, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 374
ePub: 1605 kb
Fb2: 1398 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: rtf azw lrf lit
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

This book explores and analyzes American policy toward Egypt between 1945 and 1956.

This book explores and analyzes American policy toward Egypt between 1945 and 1956.

Peter Hahn explores the triangular relationship between the United States, Great Britain, and Egypt in. .

Yet between 1945 and 1956, the United States shifted gradually from unequivocal support of Britain to opposing its position outright, which signalled America’s ascension to the position of dominant power broker in the Middle East, if not globally.

Egypt figured prominently in United States policy in the Middle East after World War II because of its . This study will change the way historians view several important issues: .

Egypt figured prominently in United States policy in the Middle East after World War II because of its strategic. David Painter, Georgetown University. Peter L. Hahn is professor of history at Ohio State University.Using many recently declassified American and British political and military documents, Hahn offers a comprehensive view of the intricacies of alliance diplomacy and multilateral relations.

Using many recently declassified American and British political and military documents, Hahn offers a comprehensive view of the intricacies of alliance diplomacy and multilateral relations.

Egypt figured prominently in United States policy in the Middle East after World War II because of its strategic, political, and economic importance. Hahn identifies the individuals and agencies that formulated American policy toward Egypt and discusses the influence of domestic and international issues on the direction of policy.

The Canal Zone Base the United Nations and the Cold War January 1947April 1948.

United States History Books. Egypt figured prominently in . Hahn explores the triangular relationship between the . 20th Century United States History Books. policy in the Middle East after World War II because of its strategic, political, and economic importance. -"Book News, In. United States, Great Britain, And Egypt, 1945-1956: Strategy And Diplomacy In The Early Cold War.

Imperial diplomacy in the era of decolonization the Sudan and Anglo-Egyptian relations, 1945-1956.

HAHN, PETER L. (Author) University of North Carolina Press (Publisher). Imperial diplomacy in the era of decolonization the Sudan and Anglo-Egyptian relations, 1945-1956. Prisoners wildly cheering rescuers. Imperial War Museums home Connect with IWM.

Egypt figured prominently in United States policy in the Middle East after World War II because of its strategic, political, and economic importance

Egypt figured prominently in United States policy in the Middle East after World War II because of its strategic, political, and economic importance.

Egypt figured prominently in United States policy in the Middle East after World War II because of its strategic, political, and economic importance. Peter Hahn explores the triangular relationship between the United States, Great Britain, and Egypt in order to analyze the justifications and implications of American policy in the region and within the context of a broader Cold War strategy.This work is the first comprehensive scholarly account of relations between those countries during this period. Hahn shows how the United States sought to establish stability in Egypt and the Middle East to preserve Western interests, deny the resources of the region to the Soviet Union, and prevent the outbreak of war. He demonstrates that American officials' desire to recognize Egyptian nationalistic aspirations was constrained by their strategic imperatives in the Middle East and by the demands of the Anglo-American alliance.Using many recently declassified American and British political and military documents, Hahn offers a comprehensive view of the intricacies of alliance diplomacy and multilateral relations. He sketches the United States' growing involvement in Egyptian affairs and its accumulation of commitments to Middle East security and stability and shows that these events paralleled the decline of British influence in the region.Hahn identifies the individuals and agencies that formulated American policy toward Egypt and discusses the influence of domestic and international issues on the direction of policy. He also explains and analyzes the tactics devised by American officials to advance their interests in Egypt, judging their soundness and success.