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eBook A Century in Captivity: The Life and Trials of Prince Mortimer, a Connecticut Slave (Revisiting New England) download

by Denis R. Caron

eBook A Century in Captivity: The Life and Trials of Prince Mortimer, a Connecticut Slave (Revisiting New England) download ISBN: 1584655402
Author: Denis R. Caron
Publisher: New Hampshire (February 28, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1864 kb
Fb2: 1276 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf mbr azw lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

On December 21, 1811, a Middletown, Connecticut judge sentenced Prince . Author Denis Caron offers, at last, a just epitaph for a slave lost to history

On December 21, 1811, a Middletown, Connecticut judge sentenced Prince Mortimer, a sickly d slave. Author Denis Caron offers, at last, a just epitaph for a slave lost to history. It is a story that deeply matters, and it will live as a demonstration of the grace bestowed on us all when a writer illuminates the magnificent in the ordinary. A Century in Captivity" is an excellent book and provides a lot of interesting information on the history of the Newgate and Wethersfield prisons in Connecticut, but when I started to read the book I expected to read about Prince Mortimer himself and not the details of two very significant prisons.

A Century in Captivity book. On December 21, 1811, a Middletown, Connecticut judge sentenced Prince Mortimer, a sickly d slave, to life imprisonment for attempting to poison his master by lacing his chocolate drink with arsenic. Prince spent the next sixteen years in Connecticut's notorious Newgate Winner of the Connecticut Center for the Book Award: Biography & Memoir (2007).

On December 21, 1811, a Middletown, Connecticut judge sentenced Prince Mortimer, a sickly d slave, to life imprisonment for . Online version: Caron, Denis R. Century in captivity.

On December 21, 1811, a Middletown, Connecticut judge sentenced Prince Mortimer, a sickly d slave, to life imprisonment for attempting to poison his master by lacing his chocolate.

Published: 1 January 2008. by University of Chicago Press. in The Journal of African American History. The Journal of African American History, Volume 93, pp 102-103; doi:10.

On December 21, 1811, a Middletown, Connecticut judge sentenced Prince Mortimer, a sickly d slave, to life imprisonment for attempting .

On December 21, 1811, a Middletown, Connecticut judge sentenced Prince Mortimer, a sickly d slave, to life imprisonment for attempting to poison.

Personal Name: Caron, Denis R. Publication, Distribution, et. Durham, . University of New Hampshire Press ; Hanover Includes bibliographical references (p. 161-185) and index. Personal Name: Mortimer, Prince, d. 1834. University of New Hampshire Press ; Hanover. Published by University Press of New England, (c)2006. Physical Description: xvi, 188 p. : il. 1 map ;, 24 cm. Title: Revisiting New England. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

A century in captivity. Published 2006 by University of New Hampshire Press in Durham, . Includes bibliographical references and index.

The Slaves of Central Fairfield County: The Journey from Slave to Freeman in Nineteenth-Century Connecticut. Charleston, SC: History Press, 2007

Hanover, NH: University of New Hampshire Press, 2006. Normen, Elizabeth . ed. African American Connecticut Explored. The Slaves of Central Fairfield County: The Journey from Slave to Freeman in Nineteenth-Century Connecticut. Charleston, SC: History Press, 2007. Strother, Horatio T. The Underground Railroad in Connecticut.

Although many Connecticut slaves were freed after their Revolutionary service, Prince was no.

Although many Connecticut slaves were freed after their Revolutionary service, Prince was not. His sufferings as a slave were compounded by yaws, a painful tropical disease similar to leprosy that caused cartilage to deteriorate and left terrible scars. He would have been freed upon Philip Mortimer’s death in 1794 had not Mortimer’s son-in-law, George Starr, contested and succeeded in overturning Mortimer’s will. Previous Previous post: W. Sherman Savage (1890-1981).

Series: Revisiting New England Prince spent the next sixteen years in Connecticut's notorious Newgate.

Series: Revisiting New England. Prince spent the next sixteen years in Connecticut's notorious Newgate Prison, a colonial copper mine that had been converted into America's first state prison. In 1827 the dungeons at Newgate were closed forever, and the prisoners were transferred to the newly constructed Wethersfield State Prison.

On December 21, 1811, a Middletown, Connecticut judge sentenced Prince Mortimer, a sickly eighty-seven-year-old slave, to life imprisonment for attempting to poison his master by lacing his chocolate drink with arsenic. Prince spent the next sixteen years in Connecticut's notorious Newgate Prison, a colonial copper mine that had been converted into America's first state prison. In 1827 the dungeons at Newgate were closed forever, and the prisoners were transferred to the newly constructed Wethersfield State Prison. Wethersfield was supposed to be modern and progressive, but prisoners suffered there every bit as much as at Newgate. In 1834, Prince died there in his 31/2-by-7-foot cell, reportedly at the age of 110. From his capture into slavery as a child in Guinea in about 1730, through his more than eighty years as a slave and twenty-three years as a prisoner, Prince had endured more than a century in captivity. In an astounding feat of historical inquiry and scholarship, author Denis R. Caron has assembled a mass of facts and insights that will mesmerize general interest readers and students of African American, regional, legal, and penal history alike. A Century in Captivity is a marvelous and sobering story previously lost to history, filled with dashed dreams of freedom, unrelenting miseries, and struggles for wealth and power.
Comments: (4)
Nilarius
In "A Century in Captivity...", the author tells a fascinating story about a rarely seen part of American history...life behind the walls of Connecticut state prisons in the 1820s and '30s. It is, of course, much more than that. The story explores societal classes, the legal and penal systems, living conditions and slavery in eighteenth and nineteenth Connecticut. Often working with what he admits are the smallest fragments of documentation, the author succeeds in providing interesting observations on fairly obscure details on Prince Mortimer's life, while at the same time keeping the story moving forward. Well researched and well presented...highly recommended.
Celore
I purchased this book because I'm researching my family ancestry and my 8th great grandfather was supposed to have been mentioned as an inmate in the Newgate prison. (He was not written about in the book, but another book about him was cited in the notes of books the author used for research). Despite my disappointment I found this book to be a great read, providing detail about the daily life of residents (whites, free-negros, and slaves) in Connecticut in the late 1700s and early 1800s.
Nten
Amazon seems to be the first place to look for odd items like this. New copy at a good price; timely delivery. I wanted this item because of the subject's involvement with some of my ancestors--but I learned a good deal I didn't know about early penal conditions in New England.
Vetalol
"A Century in Captivity" is an excellent book and provides a lot of interesting information on the history of the Newgate and Wethersfield prisons in Connecticut, but when I started to read the book I expected to read about Prince Mortimer himself and not the details of two very significant prisons. The author admits that there really isn't a lot about Prince's life to go on and includes what he can here and there, but that doesn't excuse the poor choice for a title, which I think was meant to add shock value in order to sell books.