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eBook Lost World: Rewriting Prehistory---How New Science Is Tracing America's Ice Age Mariners download

by Tom Koppel

eBook Lost World: Rewriting Prehistory---How New Science Is Tracing America's Ice Age Mariners download ISBN: 074345359X
Author: Tom Koppel
Publisher: Atria Books (October 4, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1798 kb
Fb2: 1253 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: doc azw lrf txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

For decades the issue seemed moot. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

For decades the issue seemed moot. Start by marking Lost World: Rewriting Prehistory--How New Science Is Tracing America's Ice Age Mariners as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In his book, Lost World, Koppel presents the ideas of professional scientist who think the sea route is not only possible .

In his book, Lost World, Koppel presents the ideas of professional scientist who think the sea route is not only possible but very likely. This debate may go on for a long time without any resolution and, in fact, may not ever be settled to everyone's satisfaction. Thousands of years ago humans did, somehow, make it to North America. Whether they came by land or sea, or some combination of the two, we may never know. This book will give you an inside look at how archeology works and at the intense debates that rage over a possible paradigm changing theory

Koppel, Tom. Publication date.

Koppel, Tom. Northwest Coast of North America, Underwater archaeology, Navigation, Prehistoric, Coastal archaeology, History, Archaeology, Anthropology, Paleontology, History: American, Paleo-Indians, Northwest Coast of North Ameri, Anthropology - General, Archaeology, History, General, United States - General, Prehistoric peoples, Glacial epoch. New York, NY : Atria Books. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on October 4, 2012.

Lost World is driven by an eloquent and powerful narrative that brings to life the rich existence of daring maritime .

Lost World is driven by an eloquent and powerful narrative that brings to life the rich existence of daring maritime pioneers, a sea-faring people who survived in food-laden refuges on the fringes of retreating coastal glaciers. In a captivating blend of extreme science and historical sleuthing, veteran journalist Tom Koppel tells the inside story of the quest to discover who first settled in the New World - and how and when they did it. For decades the issue seemed moot.

In this groundbreaking book, award-winning journalist Tom Koppel details these provocative discoveries as he. .

Lost World takes readers under the sea, into caves, and out to the remote offshore islands of Alaska, British Columbia, and California to present detailed and growing evidence for ancient coastal migration.

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Tom Koppel is the author of the books Lost World: Rewriting Prehistory - How New Science is Tracing America's Ice Age Mariners; Powering the Future: The Ballard Fuel Cell and the Race to Change the World.

Tom Koppel is the author of the books Lost World: Rewriting Prehistory - How New Science is Tracing America's Ice Age Mariners; Powering the Future: The Ballard Fuel Cell and the Race to Change the World; and Kanaka: The Untold Story of Hawaiian Pioneers in British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Lost world; rewriting prehistory-how new science is tracing america's ice age mariners. NY: Atria Books, c2003. index, illustrated b/w. 8vo. New hardcover in d/w. Seller Inventory 62569. More information about this seller Contact this seller.

In a captivating blend of extreme science and historical sleuthing, veteran journalist Tom Koppel tells the inside story of the quest to discover who first settled in the New World - and how and when they did it.

For decades the issue seemed moot. The first settlers, we were told, were big-game hunters who arrived from Asia at the end of the Ice Age some 12,000 years ago, crossing a land bridge at the Bering Strait and migrating south through an ice-free passage between two great glaciers blanketing the continent. But after years of sifting through data from diverse and surprising sources, the maverick scientists whose stories Lost World follows have found evidence to overthrow the "big-game hunter" scenario and reach a new and startling and controversial conclusion: The first people to arrive in North America did not come overland -- they came along the coast by water. In this groundbreaking book, award-winning journalist Tom Koppel details these provocative discoveries as he accompanies the archaeologists, geologists, biologists, and paleontologists on their intensive search. Lost World takes readers under the sea, into caves, and out to the remote offshore islands of Alaska, British Columbia, and California to present detailed and growing evidence for ancient coastal migration. By accompanying the key scientists on their intensive investigations, Koppel brings to life the quest for that Holy Grail of New World prehistory: the first peopling of the Americas.
Comments: (7)
Nikobar
In this well written book, author Tom Koppel investigates the controversial question of how the first Paleo-Indians got to the Americas. Did they get here by land? It's a well known story: approximately 10,000 to 12,000 YBP, as the Ice Age was coming to an end, isolated bands of hunter-gatherers crossed the land bridge between Siberia and Alaska and first set foot on North America. In time, utilizing an ice-free corridor between two continent spanning glaciers, they migrated southward and found an Eden-like paradise filled with edible wild plants and abundant game animals to hunt. In an amazing short period of time they were able to colonize all of ice-free North America, Central America and, finally, South America, all the way to Tierra del Fuego. And, while they were doing all this exploring, they somehow found time to invent the Clovis blade and to bring about the extinction of the Ice Age Mega-Fauna on both continents. Since the 1920's most archaeologist have felt that the "Clovis First" theory best described how humans got to the new world. But it wasn't long before some dissenting voices were heard. Archeological finds in both North and South America seemed to be pushing the date back by hundreds, if not thousands, of years. The ice-free corridor also came under fire; did it actually exists?and if it did, could it have supported life? Artifacts and fossils were being found on the islands just off the Pacific coast of North America and being dated as pre-Clovis. Was it possible that an early early seafaring people from coastal Siberia had migrated to the new world on some kind of water craft? Could they have survived the frigid conditions? Were there any ice-free areas along the way, coastal or islands, that could support life? To find out what the latest finds were Koppel worked alongside some professional archeologist at dry land digs on the Queen Charlotte Islands off BC, Canada. He was also on hand for some underwater work done in the Inside Passage just north of Vancouver Island. The idea that ancient mariners were able to skirt the glaciers by sea instead of walking through a 2000 mile long corridor to an untouched paradise is controversial, to say the least. Evidence for either theory is hard to come by and any artifacts that are found are subjected to intense scrutiny by both sides. In his book, Lost World, Koppel presents the ideas of professional scientist who think the sea route is not only possible but very likely. This debate may go on for a long time without any resolution and , in fact, may not ever be settled to everyone's satisfaction. Thousands of years ago humans did, somehow, make it to North America. Whether they came by land or sea, or some combination of the two, we may never know. This book will give you an inside look at how archeology works and at the intense debates that rage over a possible paradigm changing theory. I had no technical problems with this Kindle edition.

LastRanger
one life
Being part Native American, I have always fought the Bering Straight theory - that all Natives came across the Straight. The Natives stories do not back up that theory. This verifies the theory of life along the Coastal areas even during the Ice Age.
artman
An avid, but often "challenged" reader of science, philosophy, and culture, I value clear writing above all things. Tom Koppel's explanations of radiocarbon dating, and of all the other methods of modern archaeology, were so step-by-step and lucid that even I, techno-dummy, understood them PAINLESSLY, without my customary cerebral seize-up.
On top of that, without losing any accuracy or "rigor," Koppel weaves the story like a mystery writer, seasoning necessarily slower passages with hints at just-around-the-bend revelations. And he recaps just enough to keep us straight with the story, not enough to annoy.
With documentary flair reminiscent of John McPhee's work, the guy gives the facts AND the color, always in historical perspective.
I learned and enjoyed, which is all I ask of a book.
Thus..... five stars.
playboy
15 June 2003
Tom Koppel's new book, Lost World, is a wonderful narrative but packed with treasures of information as well. It is his personal journey with very talented and resourceful archaeologists and their colleagues. At the same time it is a credible account of their discoveries, and sometimes disappointments.
Setting the record right with respect to the western coastal settlement is only one of his accomplishments. Also he has performed a service that is beyond measure organizing into a single volume a myriad of important facts from diverse sources.
Having read many of the scientific and scholarly works relating to this subject, I must state that none has been as interesting, unbiased, forthright, unembellished and evenhanded as has Tom Koppel's book.
Louis C. Sheppard, Ph.D., D.I.C.
great ant
Mr. Koppel is a skillfull prose writer, but the facts, theories and evidence in his book are interspersed few and far between. This makes it easy and fun to read, but left me starving for the archeological meat and potatoes that I had bought the book for in the first place.

So, to those who enjoy reading themselves to sleep to well-written travel narratives with stories of mild adventure, I do recommend "Lost World". But, those just interested in a fact-filled presentation of the "before Clovis, by boat" theory of the peopling of the Americas and its supporting evidences will likely be disappointed with this book. To them I recommend instead the book "Bones, Boats and Bison."
Authis
LOST WORLD is a great book. It ranks right up there with anything that Krackauer has done. Koppel's writing is brisk and dramatic, an intelligent page turner. I'm an ecclectic reader and an armchair adventurer at best, but I was immediately captivated by these stories of extreme science. Three cheers for Koppel. Five stars for LOST WORLD!
Eigeni
This book is well written and the ideas presented are well developed and clear. The descriptions of the excavations and the dating of artifacts are exciting. The only shortcoming which discouraged me from giving the book five stars is the fact that there's a lot of seemingly unnecessary and unrelated text that detracts from the main theme and flow of ideas in the book, e.g., the Baron of beef au jus incident; I fully agree with the Publishers Weekly's review on this issue. Otherwise, the book is informative in presenting an alternative view, and related evidence, as to the mechanics of how the New World was populated by humans.