carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Planting an Empire: The Early Chesapeake in British North America (Regional Perspectives on Early America)

eBook Planting an Empire: The Early Chesapeake in British North America (Regional Perspectives on Early America) download

by Jean B. Russo,J. Elliott Russo

eBook Planting an Empire: The Early Chesapeake in British North America (Regional Perspectives on Early America) download ISBN: 1421405555
Author: Jean B. Russo,J. Elliott Russo
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (July 2, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1972 kb
Fb2: 1906 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf lit rtf lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Planting an Empire explores the social and economic history of the Chesapeake region, revealing a story of two similar but distinct colonies in early America.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Planting an Empire book . No other book offers such a comprehensive brief history of the Maryland and Virginia colonies and their place within the emerging British Empire.

Planting an Empire explores the social and economic history of the Chesapeake region, revealing a story of two similar but distinct colonies in early America.

Home Regional Perspectives on Early America. The Early Chesapeake in British North America. Jean B. Russo and J. Elliott Russo. News, Events & Awards.

See All 6 Titles from Regional Perspectives on Early America.

No other book offers such a comprehensive history of the Maryland and Virginia colonies and their place within the emerging British Empire".

Planting an Empire explores the social and economic history of the Chesapeake region, revealing a story of two similar but distinct areas of interaction and settlement during the colonial period. No other book offers such a comprehensive history of the Maryland and Virginia colonies and their place within the emerging British Empire".

Planting an Empire is an admirable little book. Aimed at undergraduate readers, it is a brief tale of colonial Virginia and Maryland and their place within the early British empire. The authors, who are affiliated with the Maryland State Archives, tell their story learnedly and engagingly. That is no small accomplishment, given how the Russos recount a long, intertwined tale of the two colonies from the seventeenth century to the eve of the Revolution in a mere 211 pages of text. Their success springs from their two-pronged treatment of that history

oceedings{AE, title {Planting an Empire: The Early Chesapeake in British North America}, author {Virginia Dejohn Anderson}, year {2013} }.

oceedings{AE, title {Planting an Empire: The Early Chesapeake in British North America}, author {Virginia Dejohn Anderson}, year {2013} }. Virginia Dejohn Anderson.

Recounting the rich history of the Chesapeake Bay region over a 150-year period, the authors discuss in clear.

Planting an Empire explores the social and economic history of the Chesapeake region, revealing a story of two similar but distinct colonies in early America.

Linked by the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia and Maryland formed a prosperous and politically important region in British North America before the American Revolution. Yet these "sister" colonies―alike in climate and soil, emphasis on tobacco farming, and use of enslaved labor―eventually followed divergent social and economic paths. Jean B. Russo and J. Elliott Russo review the shared history of these two colonies, examining not only their unsteady origins, the powerful role of tobacco, and the slow development of a settler society but also the economic disparities and political jealousies that divided them.

Recounting the rich history of the Chesapeake Bay region over a 150-year period, the authors discuss in clear and accessible prose the key developments common to both colonies as well as important regional events, including Maryland's "plundering time," Bacon’s Rebellion in Virginia, and the opening battles of the French and Indian War. They explain how the internal differences and regional discord of the seventeenth century gave way in the eighteenth century to a more coherent regional culture fostered by a shared commitment to slavery and increasing socio-economic maturity.

Addressing an undergraduate audience, the Russos study not just wealthy plantation owners and government officials but all the people involved in planting an empire in the Chesapeake region―poor and middling planters, women, Native Americans, enslaved and free blacks, and non-English immigrants. No other book offers such a comprehensive brief history of the Maryland and Virginia colonies and their place within the emerging British Empire.