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eBook Boundary Conditions: Macrobotanical Remains and the Oliver Phase of Central Indiana, A.D. 1200-1450 download

by Leslie L. Bush

eBook Boundary Conditions: Macrobotanical Remains and the Oliver Phase of Central Indiana, A.D. 1200-1450 download ISBN: 0817314342
Author: Leslie L. Bush
Publisher: University Alabama Press; 1 edition (December 26, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 200
ePub: 1355 kb
Fb2: 1233 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: docx azw lrf lit
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

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Boundary Conditions book. Prehistoric plant use in the Late Woodland of central Indiana  . 1200-1450 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Prehistoric plant use in the Late Woodland of central Indiana. Bush, Leslie L. Format

Prehistoric plant use in the Late Woodland of central Indiana. Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Bush, Leslie L. Format: eBook. Published: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, 2004.

Leslie Bush compares archaeobotanical remains from 13 Oliver Phase sites in Indiana to other late prehistoric sites through correspondence analysis. The Oliver area is adjacent to the territories of three of the largest and best-known archaeological cultures of the, Fort Ancient, and Oneota-so findings about Oliver foodways have implications for studies of migration, ethnogenesis, social risk, and culture contact. Historical records of three Native American tribes (Shawnee, Miami, and Huron) are also examined for potential insights into Oliver foodways.

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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Boundary Conditions: Macrobotanical Remains and the Oliver Phase of Central Indiana, . The Final Days of Jesus: The Archaeological Evidence. Proposed solar alignments.

This book explores the extent to which foodways, an important marker of group identity, can be recognized in charred macrobotanical remains from archaeological sites.

Read "Boundary Conditions Macrobotanical Remains and the Oliver Phase of Central Indiana, . Prehistoric plant use in the Late Woodland of central Indiana

Bush, Leslie L. 2004. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa. Delcourt, Paul . and Hazel R. Delcourt.

Bush, Leslie L. Vegetation Maps for Eastern North America: 40,000 Yr . Plenum Press, New York. Long-Term Forest Dynamics of the Temperate Zone: A Case Study of Late-Quaternary Forests in Eastern North America. Springer-Verlag, New York.

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Boundary Conditions : Macrobotanical Remains and the Oliver Phase of Central Indiana, A. D. 1200-1450 by Leslie L. Bush (2004, Hardcover).

Franklin Foer, author of How Soccer Explains the World "This book is filled with reporting that will break your heart and analysis that will change the way you watch the game. Boundary Conditions : Macrobotanical Remains and the Oliver Phase of Central Indiana, A.

Boundary Conditions: Macrobotanical Remains and the Oliver Phase of Central Indiana, . University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, 2004. xiv + 182 p. 12 figs. 11 tables, appendix, references, and index. Chronology and the Demise of Chiefdoms: Eastern Oklahoma in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. With the decline of Mississippian chiefdoms in many parts of the Southeast by the sixteenth century, a variety of new social formations took shape. In eastern Oklahoma, exchange and other interactions with the East were.

Prehistoric plant use in the Late Woodland of central Indiana.

This book explores the extent to which foodways, an important marker of group identity, can be recognized in charred macrobotanical remains from archaeological sites. From analysis of mere bits of burned plants we can discern what ancient people chose to eat, and how they cooked it, stored it, and preserved it.

Leslie Bush compares archaeobotanical remains from 13 Oliver Phase sites in Indiana to other late prehistoric sites through correspondence analysis. The Oliver area is adjacent to the territories of three of the largest and best-known archaeological cultures of the region—Mississippian, Fort Ancient, and Oneota—so findings about Oliver foodways have implications for studies of migration, ethnogenesis, social risk, and culture contact. Historical records of three Native American tribes (Shawnee, Miami, and Huron) are also examined for potential insights into Oliver foodways.

The study determines that people who inhabited central Indiana during late prehistoric times had a distinctive signature of plant use that separates them from other archaeological groups, not just in space and time but also in ideas about appropriate uses of plants. The uniqueness of the Oliver botanical pattern is found to lie in the choice of particular crops, the intensity of growing versus gathering, and the use of a large number of wild resources.