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eBook In the Shadow of Denali: Life And Death On Alaska's Mt. Mckinley download

by Jonathan Waterman

eBook In the Shadow of Denali: Life And Death On Alaska's Mt. Mckinley download ISBN: 1599217945
Author: Jonathan Waterman
Publisher: Lyons Press (December 8, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 216
ePub: 1462 kb
Fb2: 1360 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mobi rtf lrf txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A climbing bum in the late 1970s, Waterman matured into journalism and writing books for the American Alpine Club. A lyrical study and celebration of North America's highest peak brings to life the stories of the men and women whose destinies have become intertwined with that of the dangerous mountain during struggles to reach its summit. Here, he writes of his climbing goal, Mount McKinley (which Native Americans called Denali).

A classic in the genre of mountain literature with a new preface by the author Rising more than 20,000 feet into the Alaskan sky is Denali, the tallest mountain in North America

A classic in the genre of mountain literature with a new preface by the author Rising more than 20,000 feet into the Alaskan sky is Denali, the tallest mountain in North America. 5 people like this topic.

It's clear he loves Denali, the tallest mountain in North America as well as many of the guides and personalities that have climbed up and down its snowy slopes. Tales are told in a moving and beautiful Jonathan Waterman's crisp writing style really carries his book "In.

Jonathan Waterman's crisp writing style really carries his book "In the Shadow of Denali" above the . Tales are told in a moving and beautiful way, making this book a real joy to read. amerynth, March 1, 2011.

by Jonathan Waterman. A classic in the genre of mountain literature-with a new preface by the author Rising more than 20,000 feet into the Alaskan sky is Denali, the tallest mountain in North America.

Waterman spent ten years becoming intimate with Denali, the High One, once known as Mount McKinley, the .

Waterman spent ten years becoming intimate with Denali, the High One, once known as Mount McKinley, the highest point in North America. In these ten pieces (most previously published), he tells of his years guiding and working with the emergency rescue team, getting to know the strange characters who frequent the mountain's flanks, experiencing its many moods, running into grizzlies. In the tradition of good adventure tales, the stories bring the hair up on your neck but are written in such an understated fashion they take on the feel of dreamscapes - or of nightmare.

Mckinley audiobook by Jonathan Waterman. Mckinley ebook by Jonathan Waterman

Read In the Shadow of Denali PDF by Jonathan Waterman Lyons Press Listen to In the Shadow of Denali: Life And Death On Alaska's Mt. Mckinley audiobook by Jonat. Mckinley audiobook by Jonathan Waterman. Read Online In the Shadow of Denali: Life And Death On Alaska's Mt. Mckinley ebook by Jonathan Waterman. Find out In the Shadow of Denali Jonathan Waterman PDF download. Get In the Shadow of Denali Jonathan Waterman zip download. Bestseller In the Shadow of Denali: Life And Death On Alaska's Mt. Mckinley MOBI, AZN format iphone. In the Shadow of Denali Jonathan Waterman 2019.

Life And Death On Alaska's Mt. Mckinley. By: Jonathan Waterman. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781461745785, 1461745780. Publisher: Lyons Press. Print ISBN: 9781599217949, 1599217945. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781599217949, 1599217945. The world’s eTextbook reader for students. VitalSource is the leading provider of online textbooks and course materials. More than 15 million users have used our Bookshelf platform over the past year to improve their learning experience and outcomes.

A classic in the genre of mountain literature―with a new preface by the author

Rising more than 20,000 feet into the Alaskan sky is Denali, the tallest mountain in North America. In this collection of exhilarating and stunning narratives, Jonathan Waterman paints a startlingly intimate portrait of the white leviathan and brings to vivid life men and women whose fates have entwined on its sheer icy peak.

Comments: (7)
Axebourne
I've read countless books of this genre, and this is one of the best of it's kind. This is an incredible book, hands down. What makes this particular book stand apart? The stories the writer tells, after all, come with the territory - hubris plagued wannabees getting stuck on the mountain and being rescued (or not); ego-driven exploites and feuds amoung climbers; the requisite bodily suffering; the more infrequent triumphs on pinnacles that are mythical to most of us. Crack open any mountaineering book and you get all of that. What you don't get in some of those other books, however, this one provides in magnificent detail - the real, human, gut reaction to being right in the middle of it all. This author does not write obliquely. There is nothing recondite about any point he tries to make. It's the stories in this book that draw you in, but it's the candour and the honesty of the writing that keep you there. Take, for example, the author's depiction of a friend's inability to reconsile himself with the modern world and his sad, subsequent demise. The author invites you to become friends with the guy yourself by revealing his small acts of kindness and his prevailing innoscense. You empathise with the guy, you like the guy, and only then do you read about his self-inflicted free-fall. Or the author's illuminating, compassionate portrayal of the "other" John Waterman. The author introduces you to this long deceased climber and his father both. He takes you into the complex intensity of their relationship and parallels it with John's equaly intense relationship with the mountains. And then he jars you with an emotional account of a false reunion between father and son. It's haunting. The best case in point, however, is the comparison the author draws between a climbing friend's nobel death inside a frigid crevasse (a death so insidious, as far as I'm concerned, that if there was ever a movie made about it I wouldn't go near the theater), versus the helicopter rescue of some gossipy dilitantes who demanded that the pilot stop for fast food on their way to being safely delivered from their own stupidity. The author doesn't just tell the tale of another senseless rescue or another tragic accident. He forces the reader to really think about it, by conjuring two situations of opposite extremes and rendering an obvious conclusion in the comparison. His unique, bipartisan involvement in both these situations made it possible to give first-hand accounts of each. Yet he's certainly far from bipartisan with his sympathies and he's not afraid to share these opinions with the reader. Any hack writer can reproduce information on paper. Waterman infuses his work with feeling. One last word - look at "A Requeim For the Bears" as a call to arms rather than just tossing the book aside when you're done. It's the real deal, and we all need to do something about it. And that's MY opinion.
Ariseym
The book is appropriately titled, because -- while it is not overly morbid -- this is not a story of triumph or achievement. Waterman tells the story of Denali (McKinley) over the past century or so, mainly concentrating on the '70s and early '80s. The early history of the peak is the story of exploration, first ascents via various routes and struggling through rough terrain and poor weather. The later history, unfortunately, is as commercial as that of Everest.

Waterman defends the Alaskan way of life, the traditional name for the mountain and preservation of natural areas large enough for bears and other wildlife to thrive away from human settlement. The main stories, however, paint pictures of various colorful and tragic characters as they deal with Denali in their own ways. These characters fall into one of two camps. At their best, Denali is an obsession. This includes Waterman, many of the talented climbers and lovers of the mountain for its own sake. In the other camp, Denali is just a trophy. For these people, Waterman quotes longtime Alaska guide Brian Okonek as saying, it's not about climbing, but having climbed, "then moving on to something else."

For the longtime lovers of the peak, death may come as a fitting end to a life spent haunting the peak and its surrounding landscape. For those less noble, who seek only to experience the mountain before going home, death may come much more quickly (unless it is prevented by needless and costly rescues). Either way, life spent around Denali is full of death, and Waterman seems resigned to that fact.
godlike
This wonderful collection of essays explores the territory right at the perimeter of death's door. Whether by freezing, freefall, animal mauling, or altitude sickness, Waterman's heros are faced with the terror of death's domain in circumstances too extreme to admit to external melioration. These individuals are on their own as they project themselves directly into harm's way and we bear witness through the evocative writing to Waterman's total preoccupation with life lived at the edge of anihilation.
The narrative as story telling is mostly compelling but the point of the book is not to convey an action line but rather to ponder the limits at which the human organism functions in uninhabitable conditions.
At first, when Watermen is very young and sassy, he gets away with flaunting the possibility of death as he undertakes feats that beg for physical retribution . But when he matures and sets his sights on Alaska's rugged mountain terrain, he allows the forces of nature to rub reality into his every pore until he realises he has tempted fate beyond his own capacity to process the consequences.
Waterman is a phenomenolgist of death. He is also a keen observer and a talented reporter with the integrity, passion and grit to inform those interested in that domain with great cogency and wit. I found myself grateful for the opportunity to immerse myself in this world of extreme psychological states and to share via Waterman's writing in the elation, or more acurately perhaps, the ecstasy of survival in the very heart of the abyss.
WUNDERKIND
After visiting Denali and becoming mesmerized by the Alaska Range, I wanted to know the stories of The High One and its companion peaks. Mr. Waterman's account, derived from many years of personal experience and the experiences of climbers he knew, is engrossing and compelling. The end of this book is one of the most moving passages I've ever read. Having read "In the Shadow of Denali", I feel a deeper respect and admiration for the place.