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eBook The Overlook of Cleveland and Cleveland Heights (Images of America) download

by Marian J. Morton

eBook The Overlook of Cleveland and Cleveland Heights (Images of America) download ISBN: 0738578223
Author: Marian J. Morton
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing (May 24, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 128
ePub: 1289 kb
Fb2: 1469 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf mobi doc rtf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Start by marking The Overlook of Cleveland and Cleveland Heights (Images of America: Ohio) as Want .

Start by marking The Overlook of Cleveland and Cleveland Heights (Images of America: Ohio) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. By 1910, the boulevard was lined with the mansions of Cleveland's wealthy and powe Railroad tycoon turned real estate developer Patrick Calhoun named the premier residential boulevard of his Euclid Heights allotment the Overlook because of its location high on a bluff overlooking Case School of Applied Science, Western Reserve College, Lake Erie, and the city of Cleveland. By 1910, the boulevard was lined with the mansions of Cleveland's wealthy and powerful.

Railroad tycoon turned real estate developer Patrick Calhoun named the premier residential boulevard of his Euclid Heights allotment the Overlook because of its location high on a bluff overlooking Case School of Applied Science, Western Reserve College, Lake Erie, and the city of Cleveland.

Images of America (Arcadia Publishing). Arcadia Publishing Inc. Book Format. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 0 x . 0 Inches.

The splendid view of Cleveland and Lake Erie from the Garfield Monument in Lake View Cemetery-the final resting place of the assassinated president-inspired Patrick Calhoun’s ambitious Euclid Heights allotment in 1890. Or so the story goes. At any rate, a stone’s throw from the monument, Calhoun, a railroad lawyer-turned-real estate speculator, laid out the Overlook, a curving promenade along the bluff that overlooked the lake, the city, and two small colleges. Calhoun intended this premier residential boulevard to attract affluent Clevelanders to Euclid Heights.

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The Overlook of Cleveland and Cleveland Heights (Images of America) May 24, 2010. By Marian J. Morton - And Sin No More: Social Policy and Unwed Mothers in Cleveland, 18 (1993-05-16).

Since the last quarter of the 19th century, dozens of religious congregations have made their homes in Cleveland Heights

Since the last quarter of the 19th century, dozens of religious congregations have made their homes in Cleveland Heights. They have been Presbyterian, United Methodist, Evangelical, Roman Catholic, Jewish (Conservative, Orthodox, and Egalitarian raditional), Unitarian Universalist, Greek Orthodox, Baptist, Disciples of Christ, Church of Christ, Lutheran, Christian Science, Episcopalian, African Methodist Episcopal, and Congregational and now also include a wide array of community and nondenominational churches.

The Cleveland Heights Historical Society and Cleveland Heights .

The Cleveland Heights Historical Society and Cleveland Heights Landmark Commission were well represented! Cleveland Heights Historical Society. The photo is from Dr. Marian J. Morton's book, CLEVELAND HEIGHTS CONGREGATIONS of 2009. Cleveland Heights Historical Society. In America between 1946 and 1953, the German-Jewish architect Eric Mendelsohn planned seven synagogues, of which four were built, all in the Midwest.

Cleveland Heights: The Making Of An Urban Suburb (OH) (Making of America).

Cleveland Heights: The Making of an Urban Suburb: By Marian J Morton, M Morton. Images of America: The Overlook of Cleveland and Cleveland Heights signed.

Railroad tycoon turned real estate developer Patrick Calhoun named the premier residential boulevard of his Euclid Heights allotment the Overlook because of its location high on a bluff overlooking Case School of Applied Science, Western Reserve College, Lake Erie, and the city of Cleveland. By 1910, the boulevard was lined with the mansions of Cleveland’s wealthy and powerful. Today, although traces of the Overlook’s glory days remain, most of its great mansions are gone, replaced by apartment houses and the dormitories and fraternity houses of Case Western Reserve University. This is the story of that transformation.
Comments: (2)
September
If you are a native or resident of the Cleveland,Ohio area, and interested in the various historical remnants of Cleveland, you will find this book invaluable. It is one of the Arcadia "Images of America" series of books, which focuses on a broad spectrum of cities in the United States. Most of these books give keen historical perspectives, through excellent photographs and narrative. If you are an historian, or simply curious about this great country of ours, do peruse this series. This book, "The Overlook", by Marian Morton, an excellent Cleveland Heights historian, who has authored two other books on Cleveland Heights, also in the Arcadia series, gives a keen representation of Cleveland history at the turn of the century, namely, specific acreage in Cleveland Heights which denoted the pomp, power and privilege of the founders of Cleveland Heights. This property is found at the top of Cedar Hill and Euclid Heights Boulevard and was known as "The Overlook". At the turn of the century, many of Cleveland's top financiers, attorneys, physicians, and government officials resided in The Overlook, establishing their great mansions and estates as well as smaller buildings which housed servants and carriage houses. There are three mansions which have survived and are currently in use, as well as carriage houses which have been converted to residential homes; all are still standing today. The book also details the still unsolved 1910 murder of prominent attorney and co-founder of the Jones Day lawfirm of Cleveland, Mr. William Lowe Rice. Rice's estate, called Lowe Ridge, was located at the very zenith of The Overlook, where an apartment building stands today. The prime murder suspect, although never proven, was a Mr. John Hartness Brown, a business associate and nemesis of Mr. Lowe. John Hartness Brown's mansion still stands on The Overlook today, ironically, not far from Lowe Ridge. I won't delve into more detail, as this is only one portion of a fascinating trip into a lifestyle and era of incredible wealth and power struggles, in the infancy of Cleveland Heights history. Excellent.
Brialelis
I'm sure this volume was assembled with the best intentions and contains more entries that are accurate than inaccurate, but these types of paperback picture books in general seem to be put together rather hastily, without the kind of oversight expected from a work of history.

A case in point: on page 46, a caption quotes (or possibly misquotes) the Cleveland Architects Database under a view of 2733 East Overlook Road. The building shown replaced an earlier house at the same address and was still under construction when photographed for the Ohio Architect and Builder issue of June, 1904. Furthermore, the new house was never lived in by JGW Cowles, the owner identified in the caption.

In October of 1903, shortly after the death of his first wife, Cowles had sold the unfinished building to his associate Virgil P. Kline, the lawyer the caption refers to as owning the house by 1917. The transaction is recorded in the Cuyahoga County Registry, as is its subsequent sale by Kline's trustees after his death in 1917, facts easy enough to check in the information age in which we live.

Enjoy the pictures, but do your homework if what you're after is hard information!