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by Sheila McClear

eBook The Last of the Live Nude Girls: A Memoir download ISBN: 1593764006
Author: Sheila McClear
Publisher: Soft Skull Press (August 9, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1123 kb
Fb2: 1674 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mbr lrf rtf docx
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Public Books While the live nude girls may be gone along with its unique brand of lurid surreality, McClear weaves a tale that should hit home to anyone living in and around New York.

While the live nude girls may be gone along with its unique brand of lurid surreality, McClear weaves a tale that should hit home to anyone living in and around New York, or for that matter, anyone with a pulse.

So summarizes Sheila McClear about her experience working as a Times Square Peep-Show girl, and NYC stripper in her memoir The Last Of The Live Nude Girls.

In The Last of the Live Nude Girls, Sheila McClear pulls back the curtain back on the little-documented world of the peep shows and their history. A late bloomer from the Midwest, McClear became a stripper in the peeps after finding herself adrift in New York. But after-dark Times Square seeped into her blood, and she ended up staying much longer than she imagined. The story she tells is not just of her own coming-of-age-nor is it one of sex and vice and salaciousness. Rather, it is a redemptive narrative of modern life on the fringes of society in New York City.

Books related to The Last of the Live Nude Girls.

A late bloomer from small-town Michigan, Sheila arrived in New York as a struggling actress and soon found herself adrift. When Times Square seeped into her blood, she ended up staying much longer than she imagined. Books related to The Last of the Live Nude Girls.

McClear has a voice all her own, and I was thrilled to discover a history of the peeps at the end. I can’t decide which is more impressive: th. .

An unforgettable memoir of a young woman fleeing the decaying city of Detroit only to wind up stripping during the waning days of XXX-rated Times Square. Charles Kipps, Author, Hell’s Kitchen Homicide and Cop Without a Badge. McClear has a voice all her own, and I was thrilled to discover a history of the peeps at the end. I can’t decide which is more impressive: the heroic reporting or what she did with it.

In The Last of the Live Nude Girls, Sheila McClear describes moving to New York City where, adrift and low on cash, she eventually finds work as a stripper in the peep shows. The book, published this month by Soft Skull Press, has been called eye-opening, gritty and compelling and beautiful. She’ll be reading at McNally Jackson on Tuesday, August 16. Matthew Gallaway: I noticed you posted a photograph on your Tumblr of an XXX store in Times Square. Does that mean they’re coming back? Sheila McClear: I don’t think they’re coming back, just going extinct.

Sheila McClear, 30, was a college-educated girl from Michigan who came to New York in 2006, full of ambition. But despite her best efforts, she couldn’t find a job - and drifted into working for the peep shows in Midtown. Now a writer for the New Y. osted on July 21, 2011, 18:48 GMT. New York Post.

Sheila McClear, author of The Last of the Live Nude Girls, talks to David Goodwillie . Walk through the doors and down an antiseptic aisle where furtive men eye boxed videos amid giggling girls wielding dildos like light sabers

Sheila McClear, author of The Last of the Live Nude Girls, talks to David Goodwillie about her years behind the glass and her adventures in weird America. Walk through the doors and down an antiseptic aisle where furtive men eye boxed videos amid giggling girls wielding dildos like light sabers. Ignore the security guard and climb the back staircase to a small landing filled with racks of faux-lingerie, all string and cheap lace. Take a moment; count your money and collect yourself.

Last Night and Where Do You Drink When You Snap Before Noon? ) but I recently got to know her on a much more intimate level in reading her memoir, The Last of the Live Nude Girls.

I’ve long admired former Gawker columnist and current New York Post reporter Sheila McClear for her way with words (read What I Learned in Jail Last Night and Where Do You Drink When You Snap Before Noon? ) but I recently got to know her on a much more intimate level in reading her memoir, The Last of the Live Nude Girls. In it, she chronicles the two years she spent dancing in Time Square’s infamous peepshows – a vocation that has, up until now, remained undocumented from an insider’s perspective.

In the last of Times Square’s peep shows, a man pays $40 to watch a girl strip naked behind glass. These institutions, left over from the days when 42nd Street was the vicious center of vice, will soon disappear completely from a rapidly gentrifying New York City, their stories lost forever. Yet, the story of the peeps is too interesting and too vital to the history of Times Square not to be told.In The Last of the Live Nude Girls, Sheila McClear pulls back the curtain back on the little-documented world of the peep shows and their history. A late bloomer from the Midwest, McClear became a stripper in the peeps after finding herself adrift in New York. But after-dark Times Square seeped into her blood, and she ended up staying much longer than she imagined. The story she tells is not just of her own coming-of-age—nor is it one of sex and vice and salaciousness. Rather, it is a redemptive narrative of modern life on the fringes of society in New York City.
Comments: (7)
Eyalanev
In her first year or so upon arriving in NYC, Sheila McClear, now a journalist, logged a fair amount of time dancing nude behind a glass wall in a couple of notorious Times Square peep shows. It is a world fast fading now but it was still alive as recently as 2005 which is when McClear did her prancing and dancing. This book is a look behind the glass and into a world few of us will ever enter.

For that reason alone, this book is valuable -- just to get into the mind set of why a young, intelligent woman would take up this lifestyle. McClear explains that and so much more in clear, engaging prose that draws you into a world most of us would shun. It is dark, sometimes depressing, funny, touching -- in short, the gamut of human emotions.

Her writing seems to grow as the book unfolds until the last few paragraphs which are absolutely entrancing. I'm glad she made her way out of there to a lifestyle she might have thought impossible back then.
Ochach
The Last of the Live Nude Girls is a beautifully written tale of a life in the underground economy of New York. While the live nude girls may be gone along with its unique brand of lurid surreality, McClear weaves a tale that should hit home to anyone living in and around New York, or for that matter, anyone with a pulse. It's a reminder of the, loneliness, desperation, and, in the author's case, the rare triumphs of those who come to New York with nothing more than the dream of "making it." Wonderful read.
Delaath
The writer of this memoir worked the "live nude" booths in several sleazy Times Square establishments a few years ago. Her job consisted of performing a short nude erotic show behind a glass partition of a booth for a man who paid $30 for the privilege. She had come to New York from Michigan, hoping to be a writer, but soon she was caught up in the need to make a living, got involved in this lifestyle and spent several years living the seedy existence of the women who had no other skills but using their bodies for men's enjoyment.

Now a writer for the New York Post, Ms. McClear has put together a book which brings the world she formerly lived in to the curious reader, especially those who walked past those establishments often but never really understood what they were about or the way the job impacted the women and distorted their worldview.

So well written that I couldn't put stop reading, I soon identified with the author as she changed into a street smart victim of this unique lifestyle. Nobody forced her to do this. She made her choices herself. And, for a while she enjoyed it but was wise enough to leave when she saw the effect it had her.

There are also sections of the book about this sleaze business in general and the history of the politics of New York regarding this kind of entertainment. I loved this book and heartily recommend it.
Fountain_tenderness
Sheila McClear tells a great personal story. The pacing is fast; chapters are short and punchy. There's suspense as you come to care for her as a character facing the risks of her environment, and she sheds light on the subjugation of both the women and their customers in the smarmy Times Square sex trade. At the same time she recounts the loss of borderline characters slipping over the edge, she never fails to bring humor to her story. I think McClear can grow into a really strong writer and look forward to her next venture.
Gholbimand
The writing is uneven, at times even poorly edited. I didn't read an advanced copy and yet several times there were sentences repeated. It is possible that it was not editing errors though as I noticed this writer skipped around in a less than fluid fashion. At times, she rewords what she has already said, perhaps struggling to understand herself: It's not a bio of a woman or an industry but only a furtive glimpse into a period of time in a life. Perhaps the disconnectedness she had to achieve to survive drove the writing of the book as well. I got about as much of a sense of who she is (or was) as the men on the other side of the glass must have.
I can't recommend this book because I can't promise anyone they'll walk away with anything after they read it. Then again, apparently the other reviewers enjoyed it, and so far I seem to be the only voice of dissension. It seems ironic that the writing, the author, the bio, the experience of reading Live Nude Girls mirrors the tone of the book itself. Flat, disassociated. Just like some of her customers were satisfied with what they paid for and some felt shortchanged.
Hra
This isn't one of "those" books about sex work - it's more of a concise workplace drama, plus insights into the writer's life as she struggles to figure out what kind of person she wants to be in New York. The book isn't sexy, it's sexual, and at times downright un-sexy (such is the nature of the work). It's about the camaraderie of the live girls and their "us against the world" attitude more than it is titillation. You're rooting for the author by the end of the book, hoping that she'll take the right path... the end will pleasantly surprise you.
Biaemi
Indeed excellent material and glad someone cared enough. They were young girls who put themselves through college too. Some who were murdered and never had a chance to achieve the better life they searched. It was nostalgic and riveting. A tale well described though in a different era. Not that of Show World but never the less interesting to read. Must get book of the year for Sheila McClear tells it as she sees it and kept my attention. Thank God she found success and blessings to her again for even writing about it. Allowing others too observe the taboo life so many igno
Elucidates the thought processes that would lead a person into a life lived simultaneously under bright lights and shrouded in the shadows. You'll sense the eyes leering at you, smell the stale cigarette air and squirm at the thought of filthy peepshow mop water lapping at your ankles. A surprisingly triumphant tale of redemption for a woman who manages to pull herself out of an abyss created by hard times and urban redevelopment, eventually scrubbing away the lingering spiritual crud accumulated in the peeps, thank God.