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eBook Worth a Dozen Men: Women and Nursing in the Civil War South (A Nation Divided: Studies in the Civil War Era) download

by Libra R. Hilde

eBook Worth a Dozen Men: Women and Nursing in the Civil War South (A Nation Divided: Studies in the Civil War Era) download ISBN: 0813932122
Author: Libra R. Hilde
Publisher: University of Virginia Press (March 29, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 328
ePub: 1420 kb
Fb2: 1663 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lit docx rtf doc
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Worth a Dozen Men: Women. has been added to your Cart. The book concludes by saying that women's performance in the field of nursing during the civil war promoted positions of authority in the state governments to follow so as to affect the reconstruction period outcome.

Worth a Dozen Men: Women. If that's a valid analysis it must be justified in another book. It's not in this one. It's a valuable reference for someone specializing in the topic, rather tedious for general interest reading. 4 people found this helpful.

Worth a Dozen Men book. A Nation Divided: New Studies in Civil War History (1 - 10 of 32 books) No trivia or quizzes yet. Female nurses in the South played a critical role in raising army and civilian morale and reducing mortality rates, thus allowing the South to continue fighting. They embodied a new model of heroic energy and nationalism, and came to be seen as the female equivalent of soldiers.

The Civil War forced America finally to confront the contradiction between its founding values and . Women and Nursing in the Civil War South. The Civil War transformed American life.

The Civil War forced America finally to confront the contradiction between its founding values and human slavery. In antebellum society, women were regarded as ideal nurses because of their sympathetic natures. Not only did thousands of men die on battlefields and millions of slaves become free; cultural institutions reshaped themselves in the context of the war and its aftermath.

Series: A Nation Divided: Studies in the Civil War Er.

Published by: University of Virginia Press. As the Civil War quickly became a more protracted and engulfing conflict than most Americans had predicted, the scope of the medical emergency led to extensive civilian involvement in medical care.

In antebellum society, women were regarded as ideal nurses because of their sympathetic natures

In antebellum society, women were regarded as ideal nurses because of their sympathetic natures. However, they were expected to exercise their talents only in the home; nursing strange men in hospitals was considered inappropriate, if not indecent. Nevertheless, in defiance of tradition, Confederate women set up hospitals early in the Civil War and organized volunteers to care for the increasing number of sick and wounded soldiers.

Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2012 . The author of this work expands an area of study on the American Civil War during the -year remembrance of the conflict that could have destroyed the young Republic or given it a new birth. Many more matrons and nurses are identified in this study than previously recognized in the nursing historical literature. Early in the war, women established private hospitals until the Confederate government organized care for the wounded and set up government hospitals.

Worth a Dozen Men: Women and Nursing in the Civil War South (A Nation Divided: Studies in the Civil War Era). The Pint Man" by Steve Rushin (Vintage Books). A funny and endearing novel about the comforts of a never-ending adolescence and the glories of Guinness. University Of Virginia Critique Best Sellers. For Rodney Poole, a friendly and unassuming. Designer: Jamie Keenan characters on covers, without photography.

Civil War United States History Books. 9780813932125 Worth a Dozen Men. Specifications. Nation Divided: Studies in the Civil War Era. Worth a Dozen Men : Women and Nursing in the Civil War South. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Publisher. University of Virginia Press.

Libra Rose Hilde, Worth a Dozen Men: Women and Nursing in the Civil War South. S. Emma E. Edmonds, Nurse and Spy in the Union Army: The Adventures and. Experiences of a Woman in Hospitals, Camps and Battlefields (2000)

Libra Rose Hilde, Worth a Dozen Men: Women and Nursing in the Civil War South. Sarah E. Gardner, Blood & Irony: Southern White Women’s Narratives of the Civil War, 1861-1937 (2003). Carolyn Johnston, Cherokee Women in Crisis: Trail of Tears, Civil War and Allotment, 1838-1907 (2003). Experiences of a Woman in Hospitals, Camps and Battlefields (2000). Catherine Clinton, Public Women and the Confederacy (1999). Belle Boyd, Belle Boyd in Camp and Prison (1865).

Women in the Civil War faced many different challenges, each of these books touch on similar challenges as well as different views on these challenges. Women had to endure more than just the actual caring of wounded soldiers, other aspects that they had to deal with involved class, race, and gaining political rights which separated them from the men that they were aiding as well as working under

In antebellum society, women were regarded as ideal nurses because of their sympathetic natures. However, they were expected to exercise their talents only in the home; nursing strange men in hospitals was considered inappropriate, if not indecent. Nevertheless, in defiance of tradition, Confederate women set up hospitals early in the Civil War and organized volunteers to care for the increasing number of sick and wounded soldiers. As a fledgling government engaged in a long and bloody war, the Confederacy relied on this female labor, which prompted a new understanding of women’s place in public life and a shift in gender roles.

Challenging the assumption that Southern women’s contributions to the war effort were less systematic and organized than those of Union women, Worth a Dozen Men looks at the Civil War as a watershed moment for Southern women. Female nurses in the South played a critical role in raising army and civilian morale and reducing mortality rates, thus allowing the South to continue fighting. They embodied a new model of heroic energy and nationalism, and came to be seen as the female equivalent of soldiers. Moreover, nursing provided them with a foundation for pro-Confederate political activity, both during and after the war, when gender roles and race relations underwent dramatic changes.

Worth a Dozen Men chronicles the Southern wartime nursing experience, tracking the course of the conflict from the initial burst of Confederate nationalism to the shock and sorrow of losing the war. Through newspapers and official records, as well as letters, diaries, and memoirs―not only those of the remarkable and dedicated women who participated, but also of the doctors with whom they served, their soldier patients, and the patients’ families―a comprehensive picture of what it was like to be a nurse in the South during the Civil War emerges.

Comments: (3)
Elizabeth
Exhaustively researched, well presented information, describing how the Southern nurses evolved their practice, profoundly aided the Southern war efforts (ironically likely prolonging the conflict), and brought sweeping cultural changes to the nation in the post Civil War South. This book is a tribute to the women who toiled and sacrificed so much to ease suffering and save countless lives in one of the darkest periods of our Nation's history -- heroic service on a grand scale, but sadly all but forgotten in our popular, androcentric retelling of history. Only minor issue is that I found the writing style a bit repetitious and heavy handed. Still, it is an authoritative, innovative, and important piece of scholarship. I look forward to hearing more from this talented, young historian.
White_Nigga
Great shipment
Akir
This is a difficult book to review. It's excellent as a research project, but it doesn't fulfill its promise as a popular rendition. Meticulous referencing to credit research tends to crowd out the author's own insights. Professor Hilde's speaking style is more conducive to book sales than her writing.

Once we get past the strident feminist sounding title, the book becomes a very fine account of Southern nursing, describing exertions, and privations of the women that practiced and conditions as well as the societal changes that these "matrons" experienced and precipitated.

The book is mostly about upper class women becoming matrons. Roles of blacks, free and slave, and working class women is only lightly touched upon. Interspersed with observations of diarist Mary Chesnut, the book follows careers of the matrons who turned to writing after the war. There is an interesting reference to interference by military leaders like Braxton Bragg. The role of men is only lightly touched, as is role of slave labor and that of working class women. Some other aspects include "unofficial" nursing efforts, comparison with Northern nursing where more resources were available as well as the effect of military actions and prior state of the art on which nurses had to build. There is emphasis on the effect of home and families.

The book concludes by saying that women's performance in the field of nursing during the civil war promoted positions of authority in the state governments to follow so as to affect the reconstruction period outcome. If that's a valid analysis it must be justified in another book. It's not in this one.

It's a valuable reference for someone specializing in the topic, rather tedious for general interest reading.