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eBook The Place of Stone Monuments: Context, Use, and Meaning in Mesoamerica's Preclassic Transition (Dumbarton Oaks Pre-Columbian Symposia and Colloquia) download

by Julia Guernsey,John E. Clark,Barbara Arroyo

eBook The Place of Stone Monuments: Context, Use, and Meaning in Mesoamerica's Preclassic Transition (Dumbarton Oaks Pre-Columbian Symposia and Colloquia) download ISBN: 0884023648
Author: Julia Guernsey,John E. Clark,Barbara Arroyo
Publisher: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection (October 15, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1868 kb
Fb2: 1917 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mobi lrf lit txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Dumbarton Oaks is pleased to announce the annual Pre-Columbian Studies Symposium, The Place of Sculpture in. .

Dumbarton Oaks is pleased to announce the annual Pre-Columbian Studies Symposium, The Place of Sculpture in Mesoamerica's Preclassic Transition: Context, Use, and Meaning will be held this year at the Casa Santo Domingo in La Antigua, Guatemala. Organized with John Clark, Julia Guernsey, and Barbara Arroyo, the symposium will focus on sculpture from the middle and late Preclassic periods in Mesoamerica.

Clark, John . Guernsey, Julia, and Arroyo, Barbara 2010 Stone Monuments and Preclassic Civilization. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT. Clark, John . and Pye, Mary E. 2000 The Pacific Coast and the Olmec Question.

Dumbarton oaks pre-columbian symposia and colloquia. The Place of Stone Monuments This volume considers the significance of stone monuments in Preclassic. The Place of Stone Monuments. Context, Use, and Meaning in Mesoamerica's Preclassic Transition. This volume considers the significance of stone monuments in Preclassic Mesoamerica, focusing on the period following the precocious appearance of monumental sculpture at the Olmec site of San Lorenzo and preceding the rise of the Classic polities in the Maya region and Central Mexico.

Series Statement: Dumbarton Oaks pre-Columbian symposia and colloquia

Series Statement: Dumbarton Oaks pre-Columbian symposia and colloquia. General Note: "Volume based on papers presented at the symposium "The place of sculpture in Mesoamerica's preclassic transition : context, use, and meaning," organized by the Pre-Columbian Studies program at Dumbarton Oaks. The symposium was held in Antigua, Guatemala, on October 5-6, 2007" . Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 305-340) and index. Formatted Contents Note

Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 2010. Got it. We value your privacy.

of Stone Monuments : Context, Use, and Meaning in Mesoamerica's Preclassic Transition.

The Place of Stone Monuments : Context, Use, and Meaning in Mesoamerica's Preclassic Transition.

Book(s) may be Paperback or Hardcover. Book appears unread and has no visisble signs of wear. Series: Dumbarton Oaks Pre-Columbian Symposia and Colloquia (Book 33). Hardcover: 326 pages. ISBN-10: 9780884024033.

The place of stone monuments: context, use, and meaning in Mesoamerica's Preclassic transition. Olmec art at Dumbarton Oaks. Hayden, B. & R. Gargett. The evolution of political systems:sociopolitics in small-scale sedentary societies.

Publication Name: The Place of Stone Monuments: Context, Use, and Meaning in Mesoamerica's Preclassic Transition, eds. Julia Guernsey, John E. Clark, and Barbara Arroyo. Stone Monuments and Preclassic Civilization by John E. Clark, Julia Guernsey, and Barbara Arroyo more.

Dumbarton Oaks Pre-Columbian Symposia and Colloquia Julia Guernsey. on October 11-12, 2008. The fifteen contributors to Their Way of Writing: Scripts, Signs, and Pictographies in Pre-Columbian America consider substantive and theoretical issues concerning writing and signing systems in the ancient Americas. They present the latest thinking about these graphic and tactile systems of communication.

This volume considers the significance of stone monuments in Preclassic Mesoamerica, focusing on the period following the precocious appearance of monumental sculpture at the Olmec site of San Lorenzo and preceding the rise of the Classic polities in the Maya region and Central Mexico. By quite literally “placing” sculptures in their cultural, historical, social, political, religious, and cognitive contexts, the seventeen contributors utilize archaeological and art historical methods to understand the origins, growth, and spread of civilization in Middle America. They present abundant new data and new ways of thinking about sculpture and society in Preclassic Mesoamerica, and call into question the traditional dividing line between Preclassic and Classic cultures. They offer not only a fruitful way of rethinking the beginnings of civilization in Mesoamerica, but provide a series of detailed discussions concerning how these beginnings were dynamically visualized through sculptural programming during the Preclassic period.