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eBook BOFFO!: How I Learned to Love the Blockbuster and Fear the Bomb download

by Peter Bart

eBook BOFFO!: How I Learned to Love the Blockbuster and Fear the Bomb download ISBN: 1401360289
Author: Peter Bart
Publisher: Miramax (June 6, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1628 kb
Fb2: 1344 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: azw docx lrf txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

The book and bookcover had no damage or marks whatsoever and it was shipped before the tailend of the date range. Peter Bart admits that the book is a grab-bag of essays on blockbuster movies, TV series and stage shows

The book and bookcover had no damage or marks whatsoever and it was shipped before the tailend of the date range. Peter Bart admits that the book is a grab-bag of essays on blockbuster movies, TV series and stage shows. I found it entertaining enough, but I'm not sure I got much out of it. He basically presents the history of a couple of dozen shows, several of which have already been chronicled in longer, more informative books (Casablanca, I Love Lucy, King Kong, et. This book is not unlike a Reader's Digest version of famous show business stories. I did find one item that I think is a mistake.

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Peter Bart has an odd writing style, filled with facts but little finesse. He takes ten or twelve pages to cover each subject, ranging from Easy Rider to I Love Lucy to Cats, but rarely provides any new insight into any of the topics covered. The most interesting chapters are those that involve his personal stories, but even those often fall flat due to the unusual writing style.

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The book and bookcover had no damage or marks whatsoever and it was shipped before the tailend of the date range.

The formula for Hollywood success has long baffled even its greatest visionaries. For every blockbuster there are countless flops. Peter Bart presents a look at the blockbuster motion pictures that sizzle and the flops that fizzle. In doing so, he looks at the history of pop culture itself. The book and bookcover had no damage or marks whatsoever and it was shipped before the tailend of the date range.

For every blockbuster there are countless flops. Directors, producers, and actors who achieve great success with one film often suffer abject humiliation on the next

For every blockbuster there are countless flops. Directors, producers, and actors who achieve great success with one film often suffer abject humiliation on the next. After all, George Lucas may have created the Star Wars franchise, but he also created Howard the Duck.

Subtitled How I Learned to Love the Blockbuster and Fear the Bomb, the book zooms in on "the biggest hits of the past hundred years" in film, TV and on stage. To begin with, he says there's no secret formula, or as William Goldman said once of Hollywood, "Nobody knows anything.

The plainspoken, streetwise writing effectively invented the Variety jargon -boffo, payola, sitcom-that has made its way into the lexicon.

The eclectic selection of movies, television shows and stage plays that he has focused on often have only one thing in common: an epic struggle to exist. From The Best Years of Our Lives to The Godfather to the unstoppable CSI juggernaut, Bart chronicles the difficulties that almost prevented them from making it to the stage or screen. The plainspoken, streetwise writing effectively invented the Variety jargon -boffo, payola, sitcom-that has made its way into the lexicon. The history of the periodical is laugh-out-loud funny and a great primer for Bart’s unusual selections. In so doing, Bart tells the history of pop culture itself.

The formula for Hollywood success has long baffled even its greatest visionaries. For every blockbuster there are countless flops. Directors, producers, and actors who achieve great success with one film often suffer abject humiliation on the next. After all, George Lucas may have created the Star Wars franchise, but he also created Howard the Duck. Now Peter Bart, the editor-in-chief of Variety, co-host of Sunday Morning Shootout, and the former studio executive whose hits include The Godfather and Rosemary's Baby, presents a fascinating look at the hits that sizzle and the flops that fizzle.In Boffo, Peter Bart reveals the backlot secrets behind the biggest hits and misses in both film and television: how movies with the biggest stars and budgets turned out to be bombs and how unknowns with no studio support overcame great adversity to make cinematic history. In so doing, Bart tells the history of pop culture itself. He looks at the mega successes of today, from The Lord of the Rings trilogy to the CSI phenomenon, the smashes of the past including Easy Rider, American Graffiti, and All in the Family, as well as the progenitor of all blockbusters, Birth of a Nation. Bart offers his signature straight-shooting analysis of the silk purses and the sows' ears of the entertainment world.
Comments: (4)
Pettalo
This is a quirky book about the entertainment business that isn't devoted to one specific category--it covers movies, Broadway, TV shows and pop culture personalities. That makes it somewhat interesting in concept. But in execution the book is a mess.

Peter Bart has an odd writing style, filled with facts but little finesse. He takes ten or twelve pages to cover each subject, ranging from Easy Rider to I Love Lucy to Cats, but rarely provides any new insight into any of the topics covered.

The most interesting chapters are those that involve his personal stories, but even those often fall flat due to the unusual writing style. For the Godfather chapter, he starts out explaining his first-hand work in trying to get the project off the ground when he worked as vice president of production at Paramount. But then instead of doing any actual interviews with those involved with the movie, he MAKES UP what he THINKS they would say today based on his 30 year old recollections of conversations he had back then! It is totally inappropriate from a journalistic standpoint and embarrassing for a man who is the editor of a major entertainment publication.

His Oprah chapter is a complete waste of time and you have to wonder why he included it in the book--he simply found an old biography of the star, quoted liberally from it and then praises the talk show host for her openness in the James Frey false memoir fiasco. The problem is that Bart overlooks that Oprah flip-flopped after Frey's falsehoods were made public and he doesn't hold Winfrey responsible for any of the many negative things she has done, even glossing over lawsuits filed by former Oprah employees.

The author also kisses up to anyone he has a working relationship with--the first chapter alone is filled with praise for Peter Gruber's production of Batman in 1989. But nowhere is it mentioned in the chapter that he and Gruber are partners on a TV show and the two wrote a book together! On the other hand, in the same chapter he slams co-producer Jon Peters, with whom Bart must not have had a relationship.

He also embarrasses himself by looking down his nose at pop culture favorites, such as saying it took over three years for him to lower himself to see Mamma Mia. He comes across as an old guy who doesn't understand what makes something popular entertainment--and proves the point that people who head Hollywood studios (like he used to) are clueless when it comes to knowing what Americans want for entertainment or why. He has no real answers about what makes something a blockbuster.

The book should have been filled with Bart's personal stories and inside interviews with the many industry big-wigs that he is associated with. Instead it is mostly rehashed factual information that is better written about in the books he liberally borrows from (at least the books are credited in the end).
Kupidon
The book and bookcover had no damage or marks whatsoever and it was shipped before the tailend of the date range. THANKS!!!
Ginaun
Think of each of these essays as half hour VH1 specials on "The Making of . . ." a series of unexpected and unlikely hits. It seems hard to believe that all of the films, TV shows, plays, and personalities here (CSI, All in the Family, The Godfather, Lord of the Rings, Oprah, Cats, and more) - things that are American media icons - were once turned down, cut back, and, once they were finally allowed to begin, had so many chips stacked against them (organized crime wasn't so sure they wanted anyone making THE GODFATHER), that it's a miracle any of them saw the light of day. Andrew Lloyd Webber was about to pull the plug on CATS a week before it opened. How each of these productions and people eventually made it to the top makes for fascinating reading.
Crazy
Peter Bart admits that the book is a grab-bag of essays on blockbuster movies, TV series and stage shows. I found it entertaining enough, but I'm not sure I got much out of it. He basically presents the history of a couple of dozen shows, several of which have already been chronicled in longer, more informative books (Casablanca, I Love Lucy, King Kong, etc.). This book is not unlike a Reader's Digest version of famous show business stories. I did find one item that I think is a mistake. In his "I Love Lucy" chapter, he writes that William Frawley and Lucille Ball hated each other. I've never read that before. I think he meant to write that Vivian Vance and Frawley hated each other.