carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Southwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis

eBook Southwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis download

by Kenneth W. Noe

eBook Southwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis download ISBN: 0252020707
Author: Kenneth W. Noe
Publisher: University of Illinois Press; First Edition edition (April 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 221
ePub: 1364 kb
Fb2: 1704 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw lrf mobi doc
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Southwest Virginia's Railroad book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Southwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Southwest Virginia's Railroad book. Start by marking Southwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Kenneth Noe shows how mountain modernization began decades earlier.

THIS book illuminates an interesting chapter of Virginia history and makes an important revision of Appalachian history. Kenneth W. Noe undertakes, through the concept of modernization, to explain southwestern Virginia's failure to join the northern trans-Allegheny counties when they withdrew from the state in 1861. The main reason, he contends, was southwestern Virginia's greater market orientation as a result of transport connections with eastern parts of the state.

Volume 68 Issue 4: experts, war and the state. Maps, tables, figures, notes, bibliography, and index. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 13 December 2011.

Born in Richmond, Virginia in 1957, he grew up in Elliston, Virginia. Noe (1994). Southwest Virginia’s Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. from Emory & Henry College, . from Virginia Tech in 1981, and his P. from the University of Illinois in 1990. He was a Pulitzer Prize entrant for his book Perryville: This Grand Havoc of Battle Bibliography. Noe (2010). Reluctant Rebels: The Confederates Who Joined the Army after 1861.

Blicksilver, Jack, 1995. Southwest Virginia’s Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis. By Kenneth W. Noe. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1994. Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:55:y:1995:i:03:p:716-717 04.

Publications: Southwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis, 1994. 1996; Acoustic Shadows: Essays on Appalachia's Civil War, forthcoming.

Southwest Virginia's Railroad: Modernization and the Sectional Crisis. 1994. Kenneth Noe shows ho. More).

Bound Away: Virginia and the Westward Movement. Charlottesville, V. University Press of Virginia, 2000. Urbanna, Il. University of Illinois Press, 1994

Bound Away: Virginia and the Westward Movement. Adapting to a New World: English Society in the Seventeenth-Century Chesapeake. University of North Carolina Press, 1994. University of Illinois Press, 1994. Robertson, James . Jr. Civil War Virginia: Battleground for a Nation. University Press of Virginia, 1991.

Noe, Kenneth W. Southwest Virginia's railroad: modernization and the sectional crisis. V8 N64. Poole, Cary Franklin.

Johnson City Foundry and Machine Works. Founded in 1883, this major steel and aluminum fabricator company's records include ledgers, journals, financial records, office files, union contracts, board minutes, photographs, and other company records. Noe, Kenneth W.

This innovative look at antebellum Southwest Virginia disputes traditional Appalachian scholarship, which has maintained that industrialization in the area occurred after 1880. Kenneth Noe shows how mountain modernization began decades earlier, with a regional railroad that contributed to support for secession and the Confederacy.Combining an adept use of anecdote and detail with analysis of the written record, Noe shows that many supporters of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad viewed it as a political tool, believing it would spread slavery and unite the state. He focuses on the railroad's economic fruits - integration of the region into the tobacco kingdom, urbanization, a growth in industry, and the spread of slavery - and shows how these brought about political results. By 1860, the author argues, the railroad had indeed increased the region's dependence on slavery, deepened its immersion in the capitalist marketplace, and strengthened its ties to the state capital.