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eBook Yellow Wolf: His Own Story download

by Lucullus Virgil McWhorter

eBook Yellow Wolf: His Own Story download ISBN: 0870043153
Author: Lucullus Virgil McWhorter
Publisher: Caxton Press; Revised edition (January 1, 1940)
Language: English
Pages: 328
ePub: 1941 kb
Fb2: 1657 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf azw lrf rtf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Originally published in 1940 YELLOW WOLF His Own Story. This book is such a lucky find for anyone interested in Native American history and culture

Originally published in 1940 YELLOW WOLF His Own Story. Contents include: INTRODUCTION 13 Part One The War and the Warrior Chapter 1. YOUTH OF THE WARRIOR 24 2. GENERAL HOWARD SHOWS THE RIFLE. This book is such a lucky find for anyone interested in Native American history and culture. McWhorter was as committed to faithfully recording the narrative in Yellow Wolf's voice as Yellow Wolf was to "telling you true.

Lucullus Virgil McWhorter was born in 1860 ina log cabin in what is now West Virginia. It is for this reason that Yellow Wolf: His Own Story is such an important work. The US atrocities in the Nez Perce campaign weren’t the first the world has seen, nor were they the last. From his earliest childhood, he was interested in everything pertaining to Indians. After moving west McWhorter took on the task of writing about the history of the native tribes of the Northwest and battling against the injustices visited upon them by the American government. McWhorter died in 1944. And the Indian Wars weren’t the first or last ethnic - to be ignored or outright denied.

Lucullus Virgil Mcwhorter. MILLION BOOKS ORIGINAL TIFF ZIP download.

By Lucullus Virgil McWhorter, Illustrated with original photographs. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Read Books Lt. eleased: Apr 16, 2013ISBN: 9781473386716Format: book. carousel previous carousel next. The friendship which McWhorter developed with Yellow Wolf and the Nez Perce proved to be invaluable to his historical findings. Lucullus Virgil McWhorter. January 29, 1860 Harrison County, West Virginia. From this work, he published two books: Yellow Wolf: His Own Story (1944) and Hear Me, My Chiefs! (1951). Up to his death in 1944, McWhorter remained very active in Nez Perce relations with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. 77 For most of his life, he had fought to preserve Native American identities, working as a persistent historian and caring friend.

I first read this book long before college and it sparked a life long interest in the Nez Perce history and the Nez Perce War of 1877. I live in Montana so my "backyard" is where most of this history took place. Yellow Wolf is, in my mind, the MOST credible book on the war I have read. Reading Yellow Wolf and then the book by Gen .

In his interviews with McWhorter, Yellow Wolf makes it clear that there was . In McWhorter's book it was Hemeneme Moxmox. McWhorter, Lucullus Virgil (1940). Yellow Wolf: His Own Story.

In his interviews with McWhorter, Yellow Wolf makes it clear that there was increasing pressure placed upon the Native Americans as thousands of white men invaded the Wallowa Valley, especially after the beginning of a gold rush. During that time, Native Americans were being killed by incoming white people, without consequence. They were being hanged and threatened with violence if they. Elsewhere it has been He-men Moxmox. His other name (White Lightning) was rendered In-mat-hia-hia and Heinmot Hihhih. From his earliest childhood, he was interested in everything pertaining to Indians

Lucullus Virgil McWhorter was born in 1860 ina log cabin in what is now West Virginia. Библиографические данные. Yellow Wolf, His Own Story. Books related to Yellow Wolf - His Own Story.

Originally published in 1940 YELLOW WOLF His Own Story. 34 3. battle of the white bird canyon

Originally published in 1940 YELLOW WOLF His Own Story. battle of the white bird canyon. 54 4. annihilation of rainss scouting party 67 5. fight with captain rand all s vol unteers and its sequel 75 6. battle of the clearwater 85 7. indian withdrawal from the clear water 95 8. across the lolo trail and into montana 102 9. at the big hole surprise attack. 112 10. At the big hole savagery of the whites 128 11.

Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press
Comments: (7)
YSOP
This is a great history of 1877 through 1935, told by Yellow Wolf, what he saw and what really happen to his Nez Perce tribe. The story of their flight and fighting with the soldiers and his going forward on to Canada to be with the Sioux tribe and only stayed about nine months and started traveling back to their land in Idaho and Wallowa land in Oregon. A few of them end up in Colville reservation in Washington State with Chief Joseph and never to be in Lapwai, Idaho or Wallowa. The missionary and Christian Nez Perce did not want them in Lapwai. Great history from the Native America Indian point of view. How life was back then and the Nez Perce were great warriors and their horsemanship. A sad story but brave enough to rebel and because they did not want to be put on the reservation. At least they fought the best they could, admire Chief Joseph, Yellow Wolf and their Nez Perce Tribe that still stayed with their culture, tradition and language. The tribe divided because of their religion, so sad. This story was what was left behind by Yellow Wolf through an interpreter.
Swift Summer
I read Yellow Wolf: His Own Story simultaneously with Greene’s (U.S. -- centric) account, flipping between the two as they traced the path of the campaign, to get a better feel for the Nez Perce perspective, which was either missing or treated in a summary fashion by Greene. Yellow Wolf’s narrative brings the Nez Perce, portrayed almost as cardboard cutouts by some white histories, to full form as individuals, each with strengths and all-too-human flaws.

It is the humanity of Yellow Wolf’s story that makes it gripping. While Chief Joseph and Looking Glass have enjoyed status as military leaders of mythic skill in the popular imagination, Yellow Wolf’s telling reveals them as men, mere mortals who made critical mistakes. At the same time, his painfully personal views of the hardships he and his tribe endured render the Nez Perce as a whole in an even more heroic light.

Yellow Wolf serves as a good fact check on the after action reports rendered by the various US commanders, showing them to full of errors, inflated casualty counts, and self-aggrandizement. Many times a US commander claimed to have routed the Nez Perce, when by Yellow Wolf’s account they had slipped away hours before. And the explicit recounting of the brutality of the US soldiers at Big Hole, which McWhorter provides with testimonials from survivors who were with Yellow Wolf, fills in the details of a dark day in American history that popular histories glossed over.

It is for this reason that Yellow Wolf: His Own Story is such an important work. The US atrocities in the Nez Perce campaign weren’t the first the world has seen, nor were they the last. And the Indian Wars weren’t the first or last ethnic cleansings—genocides — to be ignored or outright denied. This is why McWhorter’s book is so essential: from its pages, Yellow Wolf reaches out across the years, makes us face the evil of genocide, and dares us to deny that it happened here, too.
Ckelond
From the battle of WhiteBird Creek to the end. you have the facts about what happened between Gen. Howard and Chief Joseph as the Nez Perce tried to save their tribe and their way of life. the tretruous aftermath is not spelled out as you would expect it to not be as history is not always retold completely little is written about US government treatment of the native Americans. Yellow wolf does give us a lot of insight into the thinking and actions of his hation. both about the war and about thier way of life. for anyone interested in one of the greatested strtigic defeats of the US Ar;my this is a read well worth your time.
blodrayne
This is a great review of Yellow Wolf's experience throughout the Nez Perce War of 1877 and his fugitive run shortly after. Yellow Wolf is a forward thinking old-time Native American who expresses love for his people. In this account he finally gets the chance to explain the side of the Nez Perce people. In this, L.V. McWhorter does a great job of citing official Army and government reports that tend to blow out of proportion either the strength of the Nez Perce warriors or the Nez Perce killed. Yellow Wolf takes this opportunity to refute the unquestioned reports of many of these officers and continuously reiterates the peaceful intentions of the Nez Perce. McWhorter lets Yellow Wolf lead the story and does a good job of noting any vital information including the translated names of all Nez Perce involved. Additionally, McWhorter includes a number of helpful photos and appendices to further explain the events herein. Overall, this is a wonderful book, telling the tale of a brave young Yellow Wolf who cared only for the survival of his people. The Nez Perce were one of many tribes forcibly moved, removed and murdered throughout the early years of the United States and it is vital that the true history of Native American - White relations is related.
Andromathris
Well written, flows nicely and very shocking to me how the Indians were lied to and subjected as prisoners in their own land. History books at school should be taught about the Indians point of view. How great it is that Mr. McWhorter took time to care about these people and write down their history.
Berenn
Great book with yellow wolf telling the story I felt as if I was rideing with him couldn't put the book down read it in two days learned a lot about the nez perse tribe I thought the were a passive people they were until they were provoked and out came some of the toughest warriors that ever lived great great book highly recomend
Brakree
Chief Joseph has been my hero since I was a young boy growing up in north Idaho. I've been to the Montana sites on the Nez Pierce Trail. As literature this book isn't so great but as vivid factual experiences it can't be equaled for the Nez Pierce war. It is a good companion book to the much more recent "The Last Indian War".