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eBook Defending Whose Country?: Indigenous Soldiers in the Pacific War download

by Noah Riseman

eBook Defending Whose Country?: Indigenous Soldiers in the Pacific War download ISBN: 0803237936
Author: Noah Riseman
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (December 1, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1754 kb
Fb2: 1278 kb
Rating: 4.5
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Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Defending Whose Country? book.

Defending Whose Country? book. In the campaign against Japan in the Pacific during the Second World War, the armed forces of the United States, Australia, and the Australian colonies of Papua and New Guinea made use of indigenous peoples in new capacities. The United States had long used American Indians as soldiers and scouts in frontier conflicts and in wars with other nations. With the advent of the.

is that the involvement of the aboriginal combatants in World War II was mere exploitation. where the interests of the colonial powers remained absolute to the detriment of the civil

Defending Whose Country? Indigenous Soldiers in the Pacific War. (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press). Army History, Winter 2015, pp. 49-50. is that the involvement of the aboriginal combatants in World War II was mere exploitation. where the interests of the colonial powers remained absolute to the detriment of the civil. rights of the aboriginal combatants (p. 27).

Defending Whose Country?is a comparative study of the military participation of Papua New Guineans, Yolngu, and .

Defending Whose Country?is a comparative study of the military participation of Papua New Guineans, Yolngu, and Navajos in the Pacific theater. Australian defense forces were engaged in the Middle East and North Africa as Germany and Italy continued their war in Europe, and Adolf Hitler’s army advanced in the Soviet Union.

Riseman, Noah J. Publication, Distribution, et. Lincoln. University of Nebraska Press, (c)2012. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Defending whose country? : indigenous soldiers in the Pacific war, Noah Riseman.

Defending whose country?: indigenous soldiers in the Pacific war. 2012, University of Nebraska Press. Libraries near you: WorldCat.

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Noah Riseman – Defending Whose Country? : Indigenous soldiers in the Pacific War. 2012. "Frontier Justice: A History of the Gulf Country to 1900". University of Queensland Press.

Noah Riseman – Defending Whose Country? : Indigenous soldiers in the Pacific War. Anthony Cooper – Darwin Spitfires: the Real Battle for Australia. Jack Cross – Great Central State. Archived from the original on 31 August 2007. Retrieved 17 July 2007. Indigenous Law Bulletin. "A journey into Downer's dark past by Alan Ramsey".

Defending Whose Country? is a comparative study of the military participation of Papua New Guineans, Yolngu, and Navajos in the Pacific theater. In examining the decisions of state and military leaders to bring indigenous peoples into military service, as well as the decisions of indigenous individuals to serve in the armed forces, Noah Riseman reconsiders the impact of the largely forgotten contributions of indigenous soldiers in the Second World War.

Defending Whose Country? by Noah Riseman and Publisher University of Nebraska Press In the campaign against Japan in the Pacific during the Second World War, the armed forces of the United States, Australia, and the Australian colonies of Papua and Ne. .

Defending Whose Country? by Noah Riseman and Publisher University of Nebraska Press. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780803246164, 0803246161. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780803237933, 0803237936.

Indigenous Soldiers in the Pacific War and co-author of the book Defending Country: Aboriginal and Torres . Noah Riseman is an Associate Professor in History at the Australian Catholic University in Melbourne. He is the author of Defending Whose Country?

Indigenous Soldiers in the Pacific War and co-author of the book Defending Country: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Military Service since 1945. He is the author of Defending Whose Country? Indigenous Soldiers in the Pacific War and co-author of the book Defending Country: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Military Service since 1945. In Defence of Country .

In the campaign against Japan in the Pacific during the Second World War, the armed forces of the United States, Australia, and the Australian colonies of Papua and New Guinea made use of indigenous peoples in new capacities. The United States had long used American Indians as soldiers and scouts in frontier conflicts and in wars with other nations. With the advent of the Navajo Code Talkers in the Pacific theater, Native servicemen were now being employed for contributions that were unique to their Native cultures. In contrast, Australia, Papua, and New Guinea had long attempted to keep indigenous peoples out of the armed forces altogether. With the threat of Japanese invasion, however, they began to bring indigenous peoples into the military as guerilla patrollers, coastwatchers, and regular soldiers.

Defending Whose Country? is a comparative study of the military participation of Papua New Guineans, Yolngu, and Navajos in the Pacific theater. In examining the decisions of state and military leaders to bring indigenous peoples into military service, as well as the decisions of indigenous individuals to serve in the armed forces, Noah Riseman reconsiders the impact of the largely forgotten contributions of indigenous soldiers in the Second World War. 

Comments: (2)
Asyasya
I only ran across this book recently. Essentially, it's a case study of native peoples of color in service in a "white man's war." The three case studies are Aborigines in Northern Australia (mostly in the reserve area called Arnhem Land), native peoples in Papua New Guinea (then administered by Australia as a trust territory), and the Navajo in the US. The book looks at parallels and differences, arguing that in each case mainstream white culture was repressive and racist.

The discussion of Aboriginal involvement in defending Australia is the least interesting of the three cases, partly because it was a small number, and partly because it concerns then-existing Australian policies of white Australia and an extremely repressive regime that would not permit formal involvement of the native peoples in the country's defense. The section on Papua-New Guinea is rather good, some thousands of native people (or rather native peoples, the island has an extremely complicated ethnic situation) were involved in the Pacific War, mostly as laborers but some as fighters. The ending sections on the Navajo code talkers are quite good, with a description of how the concept developed into an important aspect of combat in the Pacific (the code talkers were mostly Navajo but other tribal languages were involved).

Riseman discuses what happened after the war was over. Australian and Papua-New Guinea veterans were largely ignored, as were the code talkers. One major difference is that the code talkers have recently acquired almost legendary status through books and movies. Another differenc is that Navajo memories are more positive, seeming to reflect that they were accepted as full equals during the war (many served in the Marines). The Navajo were paid the same as white American soldiers, but those serving Australia got a tenth or less, if they were paid at all. However racism existed for them too, as they were not permitted to join the VFW or the American Legion.

There's some other interesting detail as well. Some natives served the Japanese, perhaps mostly out of coercion. The Japanese tried the propaganda angle of liberating people of color from white man's rule, but it is not clear how successful that was. Japanese rule was harsh and, given their desperate status in terms of food later in the war, it was also ruthlessly exploitative and maintained by brutal force, even more brutal than some of the Australians used.

On balance this is an informative book, well-written. The author has strong opinions about colonialism and the racial superiority structure it helped maintain.
lets go baby
A Summary of the review on StrategyPage.Com:

'A look at the service of the Yolungu of Northern Australia, the Papuans and New Guineans, and the Navaho of the United States in the war against Japan. Although the main treatment is divided into three parts, one for each group, Riseman’s introduction takes a look at some common patterns in their pre-war experiences. With great sympathy for these “indigenous peoples,” Riseman tells a rather intricate tale, weaving together several distinct threads, the colonial experience, racism, cultural complexities, personalities, colonial policy, and, of course, military organization and operations. In addition, his last chapter deal with how the service of each group was largely neglected in post-war accounts. Finally, his conclusions look once more at common aspects of the wartime experiences of these peoples. While his grasp of military institutions and practice could have been better, and given more attention to operational matters, Riseman’s work gives us a ground-breaking look at some of the “native” peoples who took part in the struggle with Japan, and is worth reading by any student of the Pacific War.'

For the full review, see StrategyPage.Com