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eBook The Trout Pool Paradox: The American Lives of Three Rivers download

by George Black

eBook The Trout Pool Paradox: The American Lives of Three Rivers download ISBN: 0618310800
Author: George Black
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (April 1, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1574 kb
Fb2: 1205 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: docx lrf doc lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

In Trout Pool Paradox He follows the histories of three very similar Conncticut rivers each with different history and a different fate; one seriously degraded, one modified beyond recognition,and another(still a trout stream) but heavily effected by human activities.

In Trout Pool Paradox He follows the histories of three very similar Conncticut rivers each with different history and a different fate; one seriously degraded, one modified beyond recognition,and another(still a trout stream) but heavily effected by human activities. He digs into the social, political and historical forces that made them different. Black higlights some of the conflicts and contrdictions that arrise when we try to restore someting that has been lost forever.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 307-325)

Includes bibliographical references (p. 307-325). Book I: watershed - The trout pool paradox - The edgelands of Alfaro - Foundation stones - Subdue the Earth - The cheering rays of civilization - Fire on the mountain - Ydawaix and Oldphogiz - There but for fortune - Dark Satanic mills - The high cost of brass - Book.

The Trout Pool Paradox book.

The trout pool paradox. The American Lives of Three Rivers. A weapons-grade indictment of river despoliation, and an astute analysis of the socioeconomic factors that affect it. (Illustrations throughout). Pub Date: April 7th, 2004.

Download ebook for print-disabled. 327 pp. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. under a canopy of hemlock and hardwoods, there's a path so flat and cindery it could be nothing else but an abandoned railbed. Still, the ghosts of steam engines don't really act up until you enter a crude tunnel, blasted through 180 feet of solid rock by someone in a hurry to move trains from daylight to daylight

The first chapter is entitled, The Trout Pool Paradox, and it talks of tributary streams with pools where wild creatures of astonishing beauty swim free in the limpid currents.

The first chapter is entitled, The Trout Pool Paradox, and it talks of tributary streams with pools where wild creatures of astonishing beauty swim free in the limpid currents. I found myself reminded of historian William Cronon’s Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England, and the author admits to being influenced enormously by his writings. Humankind’s place in nature is an underlying theme of the book, but unlike Cronon’s academic and factual style, this book is far more familiar and engaging. Lifelike dialogue imaginatively shows people’s love of rivers and their valleys.

The Trout Pool Paradox: The American Lives of Three Rivers, Houghton .

The Trout Pool Paradox: The American Lives of Three Rivers, Houghton Mifflin (Boston, MA), 2004. Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection, Random House (New York, NY), 2006. SIDELIGHTS: Journalist George Black has published three books on international issues, one each on the prodemocracy movement in China, . involvement in Central America, and the attempted genocide of the Kurds in Iraq.

Write a three page paper describing the book’s environmental theme . William Sargent, 2006, ISBN 1584655313 The Omnivore’s Dilemma, by Michael Pollan, 2007, ISBN 0-143-03858-3 Deep Ecology - Living as if Nature Mattered, by Bill Devall and George Sessions, 2001, ISBN 0-879-05247-3 Power to Save the World: The Truth About Nuclear Energy, by Gwyneth Cravens, 2007, ISBN 0-307-38587-6 The Secret Life of Lobsters, by Trevor.

Using rivers as the focus, an avid fly fisherman presents a unique environmental history of America, exploring the paradox between trout rich rivers and the corporations that find them useful for industry, while also proposing solutions to these conflicting demands over a vital resource.
Comments: (3)
SING
Despite the title (trout pools are sections of brooks where cool water collects
and serve as feeding grounds for trout), author George Black has said "this
really isn't intended to be a fishing book..."

The three Connecticut rivers he looks at--the Naugatuck, the Shepaug, and
the Housatonic--have experienced entirely different fates, despite their
proximity and generally similar environments. The Naugatuck became an
industrialized river, a convenient waste stream for Waterbury's brass factories
and other industrial plants along its length. The Shepaug, tapped to feed the
city of Waterbury's lust for water, became a flow-impaired shadow of its
former self, except for a few months in the spring. The Housatonic, despite
damming for hydroelectric purposes, was able to remain a prime trout-fishing
and recreational river (despite being polluted with PCBs).

Providing a meandering tracing of the history of these rivers, Black deals with
deeper concepts, such as the difference between restoring and preserving a
natural environment, man's attempts to create areas that match our vision of
'nature' (by stocking rivers with non-native trout species, for example), and our
very understanding of nature. We tend to stand back and picture nature as something
that is obvious and given and apart from us, and yet man must live by exploiting
and sometimes altering natural resources, and the pristine natural environments
we imagine are archaic and probably unattainable.

Interestingly enough, just in the spring of 2005 (after publication of this book), a
court settlement was reached which will largely restore the flow of the Shepaug.
Black discusses this lawsuit and foresaw the parties reaching a settlement of
the matter rather than continuing litigation.
Yramede
First let's get one thing straight- Black is a superb writer who understants his subject. He has served as a writer and an editor for several environmental publications. In Trout Pool Paradox He follows the histories of three very similar Conncticut rivers each with different history and a different fate; one seriously degraded, one modified beyond recognition,and another(still a trout stream) but heavily effected by human activities. He digs into the social, political and historical forces that made them different. As a previous reviewer said, he wants to give his readers a perspective on how we relate to our natural environment. Black higlights some of the conflicts and contrdictions that arrise when we try to restore someting that has been lost forever. He wants the reader to realize a key paradox of environmentalism--that as much as we may want to live in a natural environment, our very living there changes it.

Black does a marvelous job of describing both the historical and contemporary figures who have affected the rivers. Everyone, he finds, has a different take on the current conditions of the three streams and have different but reasonable views about what needs to be done. They all have different solutions to the Trout Pool Paradox.

The book is fascinating, beautifully written, and thought provoking. A must read for anyone who loves free flowing rivers

-Doug
Alsantrius
This is one of the best written and most interesting books I've ever read...and I read...a lot. I grew in the places where the book is based, largely the Naugatuck Valley area of Connecticut as well as the greater Waterbury area, I know the places in this book but I didn't know the fasinating story behind them. By the way, the book really doesn't almost anything to do with fishing. But it.