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eBook The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960 download

by Douglas Brinkley

eBook The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960 download ISBN: 0062005979
Author: Douglas Brinkley
Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (December 20, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 592
ePub: 1935 kb
Fb2: 1559 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf rtf doc lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960. Interview with Douglas Brinkley by Stephen McKiernan, Binghamton University Libraries Center for the Study of the 1960s, September 27, 1997. Appearances on C-SPAN.

The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960. In Depth interview with Brinkley, December 7, 2003, C-SPAN.

Brinkley's 'The Quiet World' is a surprisingly appropriate choice following 'Wilderness Warrior. Again Brinkley sheds enormous light on American environmental history. While I knew quite a bit about . and welcomed 'Wilderness Warrior,' I did not know the depths of . s thinking on the environment and how that shaped his policies before Brinkley's endeavor. Knowing little about Alaskan history, this book on the other hand took me into an unknown world.

William O. Douglas, My Wilderness: The Pacific West (1960). Is it not likely that when the country was new and men were often alone in the fields and the forest they got a sense of bigness outside themselves that has now in some way been lost. Mystery whispered in the grass, playing in the branches of trees overhead, was caught up and blown across the American line in clouds of dust at evening on the prairies.

Электронная книга "The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness .

Электронная книга "The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960", Douglas Brinkley. His recent book Cronkite won the Sperber Prize, while The Great Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast received the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award.

The Wilderness Warrior and The Quiet World are the first two books in a Wilderness Cycle Brinkley has planned, with the next book due out in 2014

The Wilderness Warrior and The Quiet World are the first two books in a Wilderness Cycle Brinkley has planned, with the next book due out in 2014. In addition to being incredibly enjoyable to read, his books are providing us an incredible service by bringing to life the hard work and exciting successes, as well as the challenges and failures, of US conservation history. I really enjoyed reading this a little at a time over lunch, it was the perfect book to read just before going to Alaska. I'm sure the present of TR helped, as well as the timely subject matter, but I found it to be a well considered and interesting presentation of the struggle to save wild Alaska.

Award-winning historian Douglas Brinkley traces the wilderness movement in Alaska, from John Muir to Theodore .

Award-winning historian Douglas Brinkley traces the wilderness movement in Alaska, from John Muir to Theodore Roosevelt to Aldo Leopold to Dwight D. Eisenhower, with narrative verve. Wildlife fervently comes to life in The Quiet World: Brinkley tells incredible stories about the sea otters in the Aleutians, moose in the Kenai Peninsula, and birdlife across the Yukon Delta expanse while exploring the devastating effects that reckless overfishing, seal slaughter, and aerial wolf hunting have wrought on Alaska's once-abundant fauna.

Douglas Brinkley traces the debate over Alaska's riches. But just as book covers can sometimes be misleading, so, too, are subtitles, and the subtitle for Brinkley’s volume is: Saving Alaska’s Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960

Douglas Brinkley traces the debate over Alaska's riches. But just as book covers can sometimes be misleading, so, too, are subtitles, and the subtitle for Brinkley’s volume is: Saving Alaska’s Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960. Based on that description, a reader might expect a backward-looking narrative, long on soporific tree-hugger reflection and short on contemporary relevance.

In "The Quiet World," historian Douglas Brinkley pens an epic about America's Far North - you know, the place Sarah Palin is from. But just as book covers can sometimes be misleading, so, too, are subtitles, and the subtitle for Brinkley's volume is: "Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960. Based on that description, a reader might expect a backward-looking narrative, long on soporific tree-hugger reflection and short on contemporary relevance

The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960. In this fascinating follow-up to his New York Times bestseller Wilderness Warrior, acclaimed historian Douglas Brinkley offers a riveting, expansive look at the past and present battle to preserve Alaska’s wilderness. Brinkley explores the colorful diversity of Alaska’s wildlife, arrays the forces that have wreaked havoc on its primeval arctic refuge-from Klondike Gold Rush prospectors to environmental disasters like the Exxon-Valdez oil spill-and documents environmental heroes from Theodore Roosevelt to Dwight Eisenhower and beyond.

In this fascinating follow-up to his New York Times bestseller Wilderness Warrior, acclaimed historian Douglas Brinkley offers a riveting, expansive look at the past and present battle to preserve Alaska’s wilderness. Brinkley explores the colorful diversity of Alaska’s wildlife, arrays the forces that have wreaked havoc on its primeval arctic refuge—from Klondike Gold Rush prospectors to environmental disasters like the Exxon-Valdez oil spill—and documents environmental heroes from Theodore Roosevelt to Dwight Eisenhower and beyond. Not merely a record of Alaska’s past, Quiet World is a compelling call-to-arms for sustainability, conservationism, and conscientious environmental stewardship—a warning that the land once called Seward’s Folly may go down in history as America’s Greatest Mistake.
Comments: (7)
Daizil
The very best book on Alaska and its people and land. A must read for anyone wanting to know about this incredible land and landscape.
Sharpbinder
Douglas Brinkley's newest book on the environment adds to his already great reads on the American environmental history. Loved the book so much that Alaska is definitely on the "Bucket List". My younger brother spent over twenty years living and working in Alaska mostly out of Homer and I never took the opportunity to visit him. Opportunities lost!! Brinkley's book made me regret my decision not to visit even more and now I'm missing the remaining glaciers as they continue to melt at a rapid rate.

So for my brother's birthday this year I bought him a copy of the book and he's loving it too, making him homesick for Alaska and Homer once again. My copy of the book is out making the rounds among my birding friends in hopes of inspiring the missed trip for the future!
Darkshaper
Excellent, fact filled details. A product of the author's exceptional research. I read with a google access device to check places and people mentioned in the book. Very entertaining
Spilberg
This book gives marvelous, in depth coverage to the personages that shape the environmental history of Alaska. Having lived there awhile, I know what icons they are. The book may be a bit long, but it reads smoothly and with a tempo that leads you willingly into the next chapter. This is a committed author, who researches thoroughly and loves his subject matter. I have ordered another of his books on the basis of enjoying this one.
Varshav
Received as expected. Good quality. Timely arrival.
Nothing personal
My husband and I are both reading Mr. Brinkley's book. I first checked it out at the library and we liked it so much, I ordered a copy. We have made one trip to Alaska and are planning another because of this book.
Vichredag
Brinkley's 'The Quiet World' is a surprisingly appropriate choice following 'Wilderness Warrior.' Again Brinkley sheds enormous light on American environmental history. While I knew quite a bit about T.R and welcomed 'Wilderness Warrior,' I did not know the depths of T.R.'s thinking on the environment and how that shaped his policies before Brinkley's endeavor. Knowing little about Alaskan history, this book on the other hand took me into an unknown world.

I had no idea the environmental struggles, along with Alaska's natural resources and treasures, that are in tension now were in tension so long ago and seemingly always in tension. The same persons who want to drill in ANWAR now mirror many of the same minded persons who wanted Alaska for materials and nothing else back then, just as much as there persons now and in the past who would preserve Alaska for its natural beauty and would never think to extract anything that might harm that.

Especially in an age where Alaska's most famous spokesperson doesn't actually hunt or hike save reality show opportunities- Brinkley does a great job brining all of us up to speed on how Alaska's past has shaped its present.

This book is essential reading to anyone who wants to understand how Alaska came to be and how environmental concerns have always existed in America and how the tensions of nature v. extracting nature for resources shape our present history.
I first worked in Alaska in 1972, when environmental concerns over the proposed Alyeska Pipeline were headline news. I continued to work there on environmental cleanup projects for a decade after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. But I still learned more from Brinkley's book about the early conservation/environmental movement in Alaska than I ever did while working there.

However, there was far too much emphasis on the "famous white guys" that Brinkley seems so enamored with in many of his books. For me, the most important people in this book are the "little people" who were the Alaska "tour guides" and "data gatherers" for the rich and famous. The Alaska roles of people like Samuel Hall Young, John Brady, John Muir, Charles Sheldon, Bob Marshall, the three Muries, the Crislers, Ginny Wood and Celia Hunter are the most interesting parts of the book. The long, drawn-out chapters discussing people like Teddy Roosevelt, Gifford Pinchot, John Hay, William Hornaday, Jack London, Warren Harding, Franklin Roosevelt, Wiley Post and Will Rogers, Alan Ginsberg, William Burroughs, Jack Kerouac, Dwight Eisenhower, Fred Seaton, Stewart Udall, Walt Disney, the Kennedys, even Aldo Leopold, William O. Douglas, and Rachel Carson, many of whom never even visited Alaska, were overkill. And much more could have been written on actual Alaskans like Bob Marshall's Wiseman townspeople, Les Viereck, John Thompson, Ted Stevens, and Ernest Greuning.

Fewer main characters would actually have made the book more interesting, as would editing out the constant repetition, some on consecutive pages, that made the book even longer than it needed to be. That seems to indicate a very rushed editing job by editors who knew very little about Alaska. A good read, but might have reached a wider audience if it had been shorter.