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eBook Uphill against Water: The Great Dakota Water War (Our Sustainable Future) download

by Peter Carrels

eBook Uphill against Water: The Great Dakota Water War (Our Sustainable Future) download ISBN: 0803214960
Author: Peter Carrels
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (February 1, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 247
ePub: 1179 kb
Fb2: 1159 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: azw lrf mbr rtf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

In Uphill against Water, Peter Carrels examines the history of Missouri River water development projects in general . Used books may not include companion materials; notes or highlighting may be present.

In Uphill against Water, Peter Carrels examines the history of Missouri River water development projects in general and describes the struggle over one of the largest of those projects.

Uphill against Water book. In Uphill against Water, Peter Carrels examines the history of Missouri River water development projects in general and describes the struggle over one of the largest of those projects, South Dakota’s Oahe irrigation project, in detail. Opposition to the Oahe project was intense and well organized.

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The aim of the Our Sustainable Futures series is to critically engage with emerging issues in social and ecological dimensions of sustainability, with a special emphasis on the intersection of agrarian studies and political ecology. The series will address new and interdisciplinary approaches to topics related to sustainable food and agricultural systems. These include dimensions of power, including knowledge production, social justice and inequality, cultural change, and public policy; and resource dimensions, including water, energy, soil and nutrient flows, pollutants, and agroecology.

Uphill against Water: The Great Dakota Water War by Peter Carrels (pp. 77-78). Changing Parks: The History, Future and Cultural Context of Parks and Heritage Landscapes by John S. Marsh, Bruce W. Hodgins. Hodgins (pp. 86-87).

Water scarcity is the lack of fresh water resources to meet water demand. It affects every continent and was listed in 2019 by the World Economic Forum as one of the largest global risks in terms of potential impact over the next decade. It is manifested by partial or no satisfaction of expressed demand, economic competition for water quantity or quality, disputes between users, irreversible depletion of groundwater, and negative impacts on the environment

Our Sustainable Future. Uphill against Water.

Our Sustainable Future. By (author) Daniel S. Licht. The Great Plains were once characterized by vast expanses of grass, complex interdependence among species, and dynamic annual changes due to weather, waterways, and fire. It is now generally accepted that less than one percent of the original tallgrass prairie remains. Habitat fragmentation, the loss of natural predator-prey associations, changes in species composition, and various commercial practices continue to threaten grassland biodiversity.

The Prairie Winnows Out Its Own: The West River Country of South Dakota in the Years of Depression and Dust.

Uphill against Water: The Great Dakota Water War. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1999. South Dakota The Neighbourhood The Neighborhood. University Professor State University South Dakota State Iowa Depression Literature Author Literatura Writers. The Prairie Winnows Out Its Own: The West River Country of South Dakota in the Years of Depression and Dust. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press,.

In hope for a good future 7. Named after a wrong person. Originally, it was named after the Apostle Peter as tsar Peter, the Apostle’s namesake, relied on this saint’s patronage

In hope for a good future 7. Named after a tsar 8. Bringing back the first name. C. In 1788, Captain Arthur Phillip discovered a supply of fresh water for his thirsty armada in a cave near Port Jackson, today’s Sydney Harbor. Later he started a settlement there. The place needed a name. Originally, it was named after the Apostle Peter as tsar Peter, the Apostle’s namesake, relied on this saint’s patronage. For a decade in the 1900’s it was called Petrograd. This was from 1914–1924.

In Uphill against Water, Peter Carrels examines the history of Missouri River water development projects in general and describes the struggle over one of the largest of those projects, South Dakota’s Oahe irrigation project, in detail. Opposition to the Oahe project was intense and well organized. After four years of bitter competition, an energetic and resourceful grassroots group, United Family Farmers, wrested control of the Oahe conservancy district board, a government agency that had been an ardent supporter of the irrigation project. That political triumph led to the only victory in the West by a grassroots group over the Bureau of Reclamation and the irrigation and business establishment.
Comments: (2)
Bev
Carrels gets it mostly right, in my opinion, except that the United Family Farmers were somewhat less noble and the Bureau of Reclamation employees less venal than he makes them out to be. The book captures the nuances of what happened during the Oahe Project (Initial Stage, Oahe Unit) turmoil very well. But some of the vested interests backing and financing the project opposition remain offstage in his recounting of the tale. Their role wasn't uncovered until the ETSI litigation, years later.
Painbrand
This book covers the changing of the guard in American politics, when authority was no longer unquestioned and citizens were learning how to organize and exert their positions. In hindsight, it is amazing that such an ill conceived idea as transporting 800,000 cubic yards of water over 100 miles to irrigate land inherently unsuited to irrigation could have held sway for three decades before being exposed as impractical. The fact that this feat was accomplished by a handful of citizens, against the united desires of the press and business and political leaders, makes it even more interesting reading.
During the period that this drama was being acted out, I served as a Special Assistant to the Governor of South Dakota, and I was impressed by the clear, interesting and straightforward telling of this story. While I would dispute some of the details, to a reader that did not live out this drama, these are of a minor consequence. As the staff member that authorized funding of the study of transporting Missouri River water to Wyoming, I can assure the readers that this study was done solely to determine the impact of providing clean, fresh water to ranches and small communities in western South Dakota and was completely unrelated to the Oahe project. Governor Kneip quickly distanced himself from this study when objections arose from our political base in eastern South Dakota. This study, however, documented the importance of clean water supplies to the public health and the raising of livestock. The rural water systems that were created in the wake of Oahe addressed this need and as the author noted, this was the lasting legacy of the Oahe Project.
There is a natural tendency in books like this to paint the good guys as pure and the establishment as universally bad. In this case as part of the establishment, there were major differences of opinion within the Kneip administration on the feasibility and desirability of the Oahe Project. The decision to "leak" and make public a wide array of documents that were destined to aid the opponents was thoroughly debated and I admire Governor Kneip's tolerance of those that prevailed in providing the public the truth.
The lesson that citizens can overcome incredible odds in fighting proposed developments is a fascinating story that deserved telling.