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eBook Meet Joe Copper: Masculinity and Race on Montana's World War II Home Front download

by Matthew L. Basso

eBook Meet Joe Copper: Masculinity and Race on Montana's World War II Home Front download ISBN: 0226038866
Author: Matthew L. Basso
Publisher: University of Chicago Press (July 17, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 360
ePub: 1632 kb
Fb2: 1679 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: rtf txt lrf mobi
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Meet Joe Copper book.

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Masculinity and Race on Montana's World War II Home Front.

Meet Joe Copper : Masculinity and Race on Montana's World War II Home Front.

Basso successfully traces a narrative of World War II gender and race politics that runs contrary to the national narrative and demonstrates that wartime and postwar power relations were rooted in decades-old gender and racial-ethnic hierarchies. Basso has written a dense, state-of-the-art study of working-class masculinity, one sharply attuned to its many ‘contradictions and paradoxes’. Perhaps most impressive is Basso’s use of hegemonic masculinity

Basso successfully traces a narrative of World War II gender and race politics that runs contrary to the national narrative and demonstrates that wartime and postwar power relations were rooted in decades-old gender and racial-ethnic hierarchies. "Basso has written a dense, state-of-the-art study of working-class masculinity, one sharply attuned to its many 'contradictions and paradoxes'. Perhaps most impressive is Basso's use of hegemonic masculinity.

In Meet Joe Copper, Matthew L. Basso describes the formation of a powerful, white, working-class masculine ideology in the decades prior to the war, and shows how it thrived-on the job, in the community, and through union politics

In Meet Joe Copper, Matthew L. Basso describes the formation of a powerful, white, working-class masculine ideology in the decades prior to the war, and shows how it thrived-on the job, in the community, and through union politics. Basso recalls for us the practices and beliefs of the first- and second-generation immigrant copper workers of Montana while advancing the historical conversation on gender, class, and the formation of a white ethnic racial identity

In the United States, World War II is now called & Good War,& as opposed to bad ones .

In the United States, World War II is now called & Good War,& as opposed to bad ones, I suppose, like Vietnam. More from New Books in Big Ideas. Banu Bargu, Starve and Immolate: The Politics of Human Weapons (Columbia UP, 2016)added 3 years ago.

So began the pledge that many home front men took at the outset of World War II when they went to work in the factories, fields, and mines while their compatriots fought in the battlefields of Europe and on the bloody beaches of the Pacific

So began the pledge that many home front men took at the outset of World War II when they went to work in the factories, fields, and mines while their compatriots fought in the battlefields of Europe and on the bloody beaches of the Pacific. The male experience of working and living in wartime America is rarely examined, but the story of men like these provides a crucial counter-narrative to the national story of Rosie the Riveter and GI Joe that dominates s. more).

Moreover, the Americans who fought in World War II are now called The Greatest Generation, as opposed to lesser generations, I suppose. In his path-breaking new book Meet Joe Copper: Masculinity and Race on Montana’s World War II Home Front (University of Chicago Press, 2013), Matthew L. Basso explores the ways in which American men on the Home Front protected their masculinity during the War, and the ways in which those efforts reverberated in the decades that followed it.

Meet Joe Copper is an impressively detailed labor history that engages with recent theory about whiteness and masculinity. Matthew L. Basso is assistant professor of history and gender studies at the University of Utah. Its importance to American mining history is clear; although women on the home front have gained much attention in popular narratives about WWII, seldom has anyone analyzed male production workers like Montana’s ‘copper commandos.

“I realize that I am a soldier of production whose duties are as important in this war as those of the man behind the gun.” So began the pledge that many home front men took at the outset of World War II when they went to work in the factories, fields, and mines while their compatriots fought in the battlefields of Europe and on the bloody beaches of the Pacific. The male experience of working and living in wartime America is rarely examined, but the story of men like these provides a crucial counter-narrative to the national story of Rosie the Riveter and GI Joe that dominates scholarly and popular discussions of World War II.In Meet Joe Copper, Matthew L. Basso describes the formation of a powerful, white, working-class masculine ideology in the decades prior to the war, and shows how it thrived—on the job, in the community, and through union politics. Basso recalls for us the practices and beliefs of the first- and second-generation immigrant copper workers of Montana while advancing the historical conversation on gender, class, and the formation of a white ethnic racial identity. Meet Joe Copper provides a context for our ideas of postwar masculinity and whiteness and finally returns the men of the home front to our reckoning of the Greatest Generation and the New Deal era.