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eBook Making and Breaking the Rules: Women in Quebec, 1919-1939 (Canadian Social History Series) download

by Andree Levesque,Yvonne M. Klein

eBook Making and Breaking the Rules: Women in Quebec, 1919-1939 (Canadian Social History Series) download ISBN: 0771052839
Author: Andree Levesque,Yvonne M. Klein
Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division (April 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 170
ePub: 1554 kb
Fb2: 1543 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf mbr azw doc
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Making and Breaking the Rules: Women in Quebec, 1919-1939 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Some women in the media and religious communities were complicit with this vision, upholding the "ideal" as the norm and tending to those "deviants" who During the interwar period, Quebec was a strongly patriarchal society, where men in the Church, politics, and medicine, maintained a traditional norm of social and sexual standards that women were expected to abide by.

Translated by Yvonee M. Klein. Series: Canadian Social History Series

Translated by Yvonee M. Series: Canadian Social History Series. Published by: University of Toronto Press.

Canadian social history series. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. General Note: Includes index. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Making and breaking the rules : women in Quebec, 1919-1939, Andrée Lévesque ; translated by Yvonne M.

Women in Quebec, 1919-1939. By examining the underside of a staid and repressive society, Andrée Lévesque reveals an alternate and more accurate history of women and sexual politics in early twentieth-century Quebec. Series:Canadian Social History Series. University of toronto press.

Part of the Canadian Social History Series series. During the interwar period, Quebec was a strongly patriarchal society, where men in the Church, politics, and medicine, maintained a traditional norm of social and sexual standards that women were expected to abide by. Some women in the media and religious communities were complicit with this vision, upholding the "ideal" as the norm and tending to those "deviants" who failed to meet society's expectations.

Making and Breaking the Rules: Women in Quebec, 1919-1939. Andrée Lévesque Translated by Yvonee M. Archaeologies of an Uncertain Future: Recent Generations of Canadian Women Writing. McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP; 2006. ISBN 978-0-7735-6022-2.

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Women, mainly of the working class, left traces in the historical record of their transgressions from the norm, including the rejection of motherhood (. abortion, abandonment, infanticide), pregnancy and birth outside of marriage, and prostitution. Professor Lévesque concludes, "They were deviant, but only in relation to a norm upheld to stave off a modernism that threatened to swallow up a Quebec based on long-established social and sexual roles. Books related to Making and Breaking the Rules.

Andrée Lévesque is the author of Making and Breaking the Rules: Women in Quebec, 1919-1939. She teaches history at McGill University. Red Travellers: Jeanne Corbin & Her Comrades 6. cilt/Footprints Series.

Lévesque, Andrée (1994). The Characteristics of the Workplace and the Nature of Its Social Demands

Lévesque, Andrée (1994). Making and Breaking the Rules: Women in Quebec 1919–1939 (Y. Klein, Trans. Toronto: Oxford University Press. Original work published in 1989) Lévesque, Andrée (1987). Le bordel, milieu de travail contrôlé. Labour/Le travail, 20, 13–31. Levi, Lennart & Frankenhauser, . Gardell, B. (1986). The Characteristics of the Workplace and the Nature of Its Social Demands. In Steward Wolf & A. Finestone (Ed., Occupational Stress: Health and Performance at Work, 54–67. Littleton, Massachusetts: PSG Publ.

During the interwar period, Quebec was a strongly patriarchal society, where men in the Church, politics, and medicine, maintained a traditional norm of social and sexual standards that women were expected to abide by. Some women in the media and religious communities were complicit with this vision, upholding the "ideal" as the norm and tending to those "deviants" who failed to meet society's expectations. By examining the underside of a staid and repressive society, Andrée Lévesque reveals an alternate and more accurate history of women and sexual politics in early twentieth-century Quebec. Women, mainly of the working class, left traces in the historical record of their transgressions from the norm, including the rejection of motherhood (e.g., abortion, abandonment, infanticide), pregnancy and birth outside of marriage, and prostitution. Professor Lévesque concludes, "They were deviant, but only in relation to a norm upheld to stave off a modernism that threatened to swallow up a Quebec based on long-established social and sexual roles."