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eBook Wild Bill Hickman and the Mormon Frontier download

by Hope A. Hilton

eBook Wild Bill Hickman and the Mormon Frontier download ISBN: 0941214672
Author: Hope A. Hilton
Publisher: Signature Books (February 15, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 200
ePub: 1186 kb
Fb2: 1521 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw lrf txt rtf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Start by marking Wild Bill Hickman and the Mormon Frontier as Want to Read . This book shows the many sides of this historic figure. The writers frustration at the negative experiences in his life from some Mormons comes through on occasion, but over all it is a good book.

Start by marking Wild Bill Hickman and the Mormon Frontier as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Hope A. Hilton’s books. Wild Bill Hickman and the Mormon Frontier. Discovering Lehi: New Evidence of Lehi and Nephi in Arabia by. Lynn M. Hilton, Hope A. Hilton.

Find sources: "Wild Bill Hickman" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (August 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template . a b c d e Hilton, Hope A. (1988). Wild Bill" Hickman and the Mormon Frontier.

Find sources: "Wild Bill Hickman" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (August 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). Beadle, John Hanson (1904). Brigham's Destroying Angel: Being the Life, Confession and Startling Disclosures of the Notorious Bill Hickman, Danite Chief of Utah. Shepard Book Company. Black Hawk Productions: Fort Utah.

Wild Bill" Hickman and the Mormon Frontier. This book is more about Brigham Young than it is an expose' of the early Mormon church

Wild Bill" Hickman and the Mormon Frontier. During this time Bill Hickman was a practicing Mormon in good standing and had ten wives. This book is more about Brigham Young than it is an expose' of the early Mormon church. Bill Hickman, for all intents and purposes was a 'hitman' for Young. Hickman, at one time a devout Mormon, did the bidding of Brigham Young without question.

William Adams (Wild Bill) Hickman was one of the most notorious outlaws of the nineteenth-century American frontier. During the 1840s and 1850s, he served as a trusted aide and spy to LDS church presidents Joseph Smith and Brigham Young

William Adams (Wild Bill) Hickman was one of the most notorious outlaws of the nineteenth-century American frontier. During the 1840s and 1850s, he served as a trusted aide and spy to LDS church presidents Joseph Smith and Brigham Young. Hickman left an indelible impact on the history and myth of the West as a rough, undisciplined frontiersman who nevertheless helped to establish the Rocky Mountain kingdom of the Mormons.

and the Mormon Frontier. Ogden Standard Examiner, John Devilbiss. When Hope A. Hilton first read the book her great-grandfather wrote about himself, it sparked a flame of curiosity that grew brighter over the years. It was Christmas Day afternoon 129 years ago when William A. Hickman, standing in front of the Townsend Hotel on First South and West Temple in Salt Lake City, dared another man to shoot him. Hickman, who was well-known locally as "Wild Bill," was quick with his temper and fast with the pearl-handled Colt and Yaeger revolvers that he kept slung around his hips. Was he really as bad as he made himself out to be?

Hilton, Hope A. Publication, Distribution, et. Salt Lake City Bibliography: p. -153. Personal Name: Hickman, William Adams, 1815-1883. Geographic Name: Utah History.

Hilton, Hope A. Salt Lake City. Signature Books, (c)1988. Bibliography: p. Rubrics: Mormons Utah Biography Peace officers Frontier and pioneer life. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780941214674 (978-41214-67-4) Softcover, Signature Books, 1989. Learn More at LibraryThing. Hope A. Hilton at LibraryThing.

Published 1988 by Signature Books in Salt Lake City.

Wild Bill" Hickman and the Mormon frontier Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove "Wild Bill" Hickman and the Mormon frontier from your list? "Wild Bill" Hickman and the Mormon frontier. Published 1988 by Signature Books in Salt Lake City.

References Hilton, Hope A. (1988), "Wild Bill" Hickman and the Mormon Frontier, Signature Books, ISBN 41214-67-2 Beadle, . Wild Bill' Hickman and the Mormon Frontier Ogden Standard Examiner, John Devilbiss.

William Adams ("Wild Bill") Hickman was one of the most notorious outlaws of the nineteenth-century American frontier. As a bodyguard and spy for Mormon church presidents Joseph Smith and Brigham Young, he was popularly known as a "destroying angel." However, a matter of disagreement among historians is whether he acted more often in his church's interest or independently as a true renegade. Hickman obeyed the Mormon teaching of polygamy and was husband to ten wives and father to thirty-five children. During the Utah War of 1857-58, he rallied with his fellow Mormons and was one of the most effective guerillas in the hit-and-run attacks that wore down the attacking U.S. Army. When he was later arrested and jailed for murdering a government arms dealer during the war, his troubles multiplied when he implicated Brigham Young. Young returned the favor by excommunicating him and never speaking to him again. When he died in Wyoming in 1883, his reputation in three states forced many of his relatives to change their name to escape the social stigma of family ties, while the residents of the small town in which he died refused to bury him in the city cemetery. Still, whatever one thinks of his motives or degree of loyalty, Hickman left an indelible impact on the history and myth of the West as a rough, undisciplined frontiersman who nevertheless helped to establish the Rocky Mountain kingdom of Mormons.
Comments: (7)
Tygralbine
I felt like the author wasn't too excited about the character. It was okay. Unless you are related to this person I don't think it is a must have for your collection.
Yramede
I am sort of a Mormon Western history buff. I knew something about Bill Hickman, but haven't had the opportunity to read much about him. He was similar to Porter Rockwell, but without the protection that Porter enjoyed. He was a killer, but maybe it was the survival of the fittist in those days. I couldn't put it down, read it in three days. Enjoyed it very much.
Cargahibe
Bill Hickman was one of the most interesting rogues in Mormonism. A self¬styled enforcer for the church, his career is deserving of a high-caliber biography. Unfortunately, "`Wild Bill' Hickman and the Mormon Frontier" is not of high caliber.

Bill Hickman grew up in Missouri and in 1838 affiliated with the Mormon church, quickly becoming a member of the Danite vigilante group that terrorized dissidents. Migrating to Utah, Hickman continued his violent lifestyle, where his activities included, among others, guerilla operations in the 1857-1858 Mormon War. Hickman admitted to the murders of several people, suggesting that he had been taking orders from Brigham Young. When his activities became embarrassing to the church, Hickman engaged in a game of power politics, playing Mormon and government officials against each other. He was successful for a time, but his violence eventually made him persona non grata in both camps. In 1872 he published an expose, "Brigham's Destroying Angel," which implicated the Mormon leadership in his misdeeds. Hickman finally died in 1883 in obscurity near Lander, Wyoming.

Hilton's book has several problems. As one example, there is a disturbing lack of documentation. She declares in the preface that footnotes "can be distracting," and that she "instead tried to provide enough information within the text to allow the reader to locate the appropriate reference in the bibliography" (p. xi). Unfortunately, locating sources is nearly impossible in many cases, especially in instances where it would be most useful.

The author also fails to organize the work into a coherent form. For instance, in a chapter entitled "The RLDS in Utah," less than a full page is devoted to that subject, and the remainder is concerned with other Hickman activities not related to the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

But these are minor difficulties compared to central questions left perplexingly unexplored. Hilton's inability to deal with the difficult issue of what was fact and what was fancy in "Brigham's Destroying Angel," despite a promise to do so in the preface, was disappointing. Was it written out of spite? What basis in fact did it have? Additionally, and it is fundamental to considering the career of Hickman, what was his relationship to Brigham Young? Young was clearly aware of Hickman's lawlessness but still used him to carry out dangerous assignments, until Hickman's reputation became so colored that it significantly hurt the church. Hilton does not know or does not care about Young's role in murders and other felonies apparently committed by Hickman. Did Hickman carry out his activities at the direction of the church? The work is unclear on such crucial questions.

"`Wild Bill' Hickman and the Mormon Frontier" is a mildly interesting book, but a full understanding of this man's career awaits additional work. Hickman remains a subject in need of a good critical biography.
Whitehammer
Interestingly enough, this book was written by a lady who found out that she was related to Mr. Hickman. This is a man who was a bodyguard for both Joseph Smith as well as Brigham Young. There is the forever question, Were there Danites?" And, if so, "What were they? And, what did they do?" This is a well thought out book. Her report is mostly documentary with personal pursuasions regarding the validity of certain things said by Mr. Hickman in his autobiography. I feel as though the author has a pretty good common sense approach in applying her rearch and explaining her reasons for accepting or rejecting certain statements make by him. I read it as a companion book to "Wild Bills'" autobiography. An excellent read for me.
tamada
I found this volume to be very well done and very interesting. What I particularly appreciated was that it was written with a more objective view as to this man and the legends and truth about him. Very well done.
JoJoshura
I am an ex-wife of a Hickman great-grandson who looks just like Wild Bill and has the same problem discerning right and wrong. I raise three of his descendants, and they're not o.k. with this man. Anyone who says he was merely a product of his time must be overlooking the vast majority of LDS saints who were also alive and products of that time who were good and kind people. Wild Bill was a mentally ill anomaly, and this book did not represent him as such. I can say that in doing research on this man to understand the sociopathic behavior of my ex's family, and to answer my children's questions, I found this book to be woefully incomplete. Remember, there were ten wives, all of them divorced him except the one, and Brigham Young has an account of his own that I did not see represented here. According to my research he implicated Brigham Young in some murders because the Feds told him they would let him go free without trial if Wild Bill could deliver Brigham Young to them. With Pres. Young behind bars, the Feds would have taken control of the Utah territory and owned the West and its rich resources completely. I don't care how you spin Wild Bill's actions, he was a murderer and an enemy of the church. So...I'm not likely to take a sociopath's personal story at face value. I understand Hope's intent, but she needed a broader base of research. To her credit, she did something, which is more than most of us can say.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor
I found this book to be very informative on a factual and personal level as I am one of Hickman's descendants. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the early days of Utah.