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eBook Daughters of Aquarius: Women of the Sixties Counterculture (CultureAmerica) download

by Gretchen Lemke-Santagelo

eBook Daughters of Aquarius: Women of the Sixties Counterculture (CultureAmerica) download ISBN: 0700616330
Author: Gretchen Lemke-Santagelo
Publisher: University Press of Kansas (April 2, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 248
ePub: 1640 kb
Fb2: 1828 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf rtf lrf azw
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Daughters of Aquarius thus offers a strong corrective to misguided conventional wisdom about hippie culture. Lemke-Santangelo takes a necessary step in interpreting the historical and cultural importance of hippie women

Daughters of Aquarius thus offers a strong corrective to misguided conventional wisdom about hippie culture. Its greatest achievement, I think, lies in capturing the voices of the women themselves. Panoramic in scope, novel in substance, and full of heart. Lemke-Santangelo takes a necessary step in interpreting the historical and cultural importance of hippie women. Relying on extensive primary sources, her book is realistic, sophisticated, and long overdue. -Roberta Price, author of Huerfano: A Memoir of Life in the Counterculture.

Sixties Counterculture. Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo. an enduring aspect of women’s work (counterculture acies to the psychedelic collage of the Sixties counter-. Lawrence, KS: University. Press of Kansas, 2009. Although Daughters of Aquarius need not be read. The very beginning, in fact. Santangelo’s ‘‘Acknowledgments’’ page compellingly. exemplifies one of the book’s main tenets, namely that. Of the book’s seven chapters, Chapter 1, titled. ‘Goddesses, Chicks, Earth Mothers, and Groupies

Daughters of Aquarius: Women of the Sixties Counterculture (CultureAmerica) by Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo (15-Apr-2009) Hardcover Hardcover – 1600. by Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo (Author).

Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo presents an in-depth view of the experiences of young women who rejected mainstream .

Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo presents an in-depth view of the experiences of young women who rejected mainstream society in the Sixties. While clearly partial to the idealistic spirit and aesthetic impulses of the counter-culture, especially as it was lived by women, Lemke-Santangelo does an excellent job of presenting a nuanced, complex view of her chosen subject, resisting the temptation to romanticize the past. She notes, for instance, that hippie rejection of their parents' middleclass norms and late 20th century society's accumulated scientific wisdom came with a price.

Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo now takes readers back to Haight Ashbury and country communes to reveal how they . This is the first book to focus specifically on women of the counterculture

Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo now takes readers back to Haight Ashbury and country communes to reveal how they experienced and shaped the counterculture. She draws on the personal recollections of women who were there-including such pivotal figures as Lenore Kendall, Diane DiPrima, and Carolyn Adams-to gain insight into what made counterculture women tick, how they lived their days, and how they envisioned their lives. This is the first book to focus specifically on women of the counterculture.

Daughters of Aquarius book. It was a sign of the sixties. Lemke-Santangelo is critical of the difference-based cultural feminism that developed in and beyond the era; clearly she prefers the type of radical feminism that views all difference in terms of social construction. I'm much more sympathetic to cultural feminism, but it really doesn't diminish the value of a book that should be read by anyone with a serious interest in women and gender in the Sixties. Jan 04, 2014 Elizabeth rated it it was amazing.

Part of the CultureAmerica Series). by Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo. It was a sign of the sixties

book by Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo. Part of the CultureAmerica Series). Drawn by the promise of spiritual and creative freedom, thousands of women from white middle-class homes rejected the suburban domesticity of their mothers to adopt lifestyles more like those of their great-grandmothers. They eagerly learned "new" skills, from composting to quilting, as they took up the decade's quest for self-realization.

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo presents an in-depth view of the experiences of young women wh. .Published: 1 January 2009.

Books online: Daughters of Aquarius: Women of the Sixties Counterculture (CultureAmerica) .

Books online: Daughters of Aquarius: Women of the Sixties Counterculture (CultureAmerica), 2009, Fishpond. Roberta Price, author of Huerfano: A Memoir of Life in the Counterculture.

Daughters of Aquarius thus offers a strong corrective to misguided conventional wisdom about . Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo is professor of history at St. Mary's College of California.

Daughters of Aquarius thus offers a strong corrective to misguided conventional wisdom about hippie culture. Brings to life the passions and fusions of hippie women, moving beyond the stereotypes of hippie chick and earth mother to restore the women of the counterculture to their rightful place in the history of American feminism.

It was a sign of the sixties. Drawn by the promise of spiritual and creative freedom, thousands of women from white middle-class homes rejected the suburban domesticity of their mothers to adopt lifestyles more like those of their great-grandmothers. They eagerly learned "new" skills, from composting to quilting, as they took up the decade's quest for self-realization."Hippie women" have alternately been seen as earth mothers or love goddesses, virgins or vamps-images that have obscured the real complexity of their lives. Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo now takes readers back to Haight Ashbury and country communes to reveal how they experienced and shaped the counterculture. She draws on the personal recollections of women who were there—including such pivotal figures as Lenore Kendall, Diane DiPrima, and Carolyn Adams—to gain insight into what made counterculture women tick, how they lived their days, and how they envisioned their lives.This is the first book to focus specifically on women of the counterculture. It describes how gender was perceived within the movement, with women taking on much of the responsibility for sustaining communes. It also examines the lives of younger runaways and daughters who shared the lifestyle. And while it explores the search for self enlightenment at the core of the counterculture experience, it also recounts the problems faced by those who resisted the expectations of "free love" and discusses the sexism experienced by women in the arts.Lemke-Santangelo's work also extends our understanding of second-wave feminism. She argues that counterculture women, despite their embrace of traditional roles, claimed power by virtue of gender difference and revived an older agrarian ideal that assigned greater value to female productive labor. Perhaps most important, she shows how they used these values to move counterculture practices into the mainstream, helping transform middle-class attitudes toward everything from spirituality to childrearing to the environment.Featuring photographs and poster art that bring the era to life, Daughters of Aquarius provides both an inside look at a defining movement and a needed corrective to long-held stereotypes of the counterculture . For everyone who was part of that scene—or just wonders what it was like—this book offers a new perspective on those experiences and on cultural innovations that have affected all our lives.
Comments: (5)
Gavirus
I'm rating this book before I really read it,which is unfair, BUT: it had been recommended to me as an introduction to Santangelos ideas, and since it covers an area I had thought very much needed attention and which frees me from having to do it, I immediately ordered it. I'm recovering fro double knee replacement surgery, and it was awaiting me on my return home from hospital. A friend, more clearheaded than I at that moment, paged through, found references to ME (!), and when I followed up in the lovely index, found more, which were surprisingly accurate, I was thrilled.
The women in the time between the Beats and the Hippies were the workhorses and the guys were in the limelight. I had long felt that those of us in that shift from the dark emotional times and colors of the existential thinking of the Beats and the burst into full color of the Flower Children did a lot of the setup for the coming Baby Boomer kids and the Times They Are A'Changin' generation. The philosophy and values, you might say. This was pre-Women's Movement, and brought on that and all the FREEDOM movement stuff that followed in its wake. Make Love Not War, Be Here Now, voluntary simplicity, free food and healthcare for the needy kids arriving in SFF, environmentalism, recycling, all of what followed in the wake of these important times! 50 years after the Summer of Love, it's time to celebrate. Yay, Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo!
Eseve
Fabulous book! Very happy with this.
Mr_NiCkNaMe
I don't know why I expected a more academic work. I re-read the cover and the fly leaf, and see that it did not promise to be so. Perhaps my unwarranted expectations (and some knowledge of the counterculture) led to my disappointment in this book.

The book is a collection of narratives arranged by topic. Unfortunately they are very sketchy. Some raise more questions than they answer. While the individual anecdotes might be new to those who pick up a book like this, the concepts they illustrate are not. The occasionally used statistics are limited. For instance, data from Connecticut is used to show that female runaways were punished more than males. I was surprised to read that counterculture women had children later than their peers, but there was no data to back it up.

The author defends counterculture women against the charges that they were not feminists. The defense is not a focused. There are no bullets, points or clearly defined arguments. The defense is in how she portrays the women through their individual stories. From interviews and published writings, she presents stories of women helping one another in childbirth, organizing the domestic work of group living siutations and developing alternative careers in crafts and food. She portrays strong women who root extended families as the men philosophized, crashed cars and "split". While sexual liberation is attributed to them, she shows how this was a dubious liberation. In the end she presents anecdotal evidence that the children of these women are considered brighter, more imaginative and more mature than their peers in school.

The counterculture women are clearly not their pre-feminist mothers. Was their assessment of options (pre-feminist jobs, living with parents and/or conventional marriage) and rejection of them rational for the times? For those that had a feminist awakening, did it come before or after (chronologically by age or year) their peers? I'd like to know overall, and not through a selected vignettes, what are they doing now, and how they view their experience. A better description of the children, some now parents themselves would be good.

I'd like to see the solid academic work on this topic that I thought this book might be.
Phalaken
Women of the sixties stepped out of their kitchens & were a significant part of the social changes occurring in the sixties. Changes in roles, changes in perception, & changes in everyday activities are the "Daughters of Aquarius'" crede.
Black_Hawk_Down
Arrived in perfect time. Great copy! Thank you