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eBook The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule: A History of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, 1519-1810 download

by Charles Gibson

eBook The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule: A History of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, 1519-1810 download ISBN: 0804701962
Author: Charles Gibson
Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (June 1, 1964)
Language: English
Pages: 687
ePub: 1835 kb
Fb2: 1584 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf lrf azw mobi
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Gibson, Charles, 1920-. Stanford University Press.

Gibson, Charles, 1920-.

The "Black Legend" of the Spanish conquest and occupation of the New World has long shaded perceptions .

The "Black Legend" of the Spanish conquest and occupation of the New World has long shaded perceptions of European colonization in Latin America. Charles Gibson, in his ground-breaking study closely considers the social, political and economic effects of Spanish rule on the indigenous population. It is an exhaustive and detailed study that altered perceptions of this period of Latin American history. The general reader will probably waant to pick and choose through the text such is its depth, but it remains an outstanding history.

The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule: A History of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, 1519–1810. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1969. The Inca Concept of Sovereignty and the Spanish Administration of Peru Austin: University of Texas Press 1948. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1964. Spain in America New York: Harper & Row, 1966. The Spanish Tradition in America. New York: Harper & Row. 1968. Republished, New York: Greenwood Press, 1969. The Colonial Period in Latin American History. 2nd. ed. Washington: American Historical Association, 1970, 1968. The Black Legend: Anti-Spanish Attitudes in the Old World and the New.

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Here is the complete history of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, one of the two most important religious groups in the Spanish empire in America, from the Conquest to Independence in the early nineteenth century.

Here is the complete history of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, one of the two most important religious groups in the Spanish empire in America, from th. .

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JENNINGS Francis, 1975, The Invasion of America: Indians, colonialism and the cant of conquest. Chapel Hill NC. JUNTA PRINCIPAL DE CARIDAD, 1779, Noticia de las providencias tomadas por esta Noblísima Ciudad acerca de la asistencia de los enfermos, y precaución del contagio, para su mas puntual execución. a beneficio de la salubridad de los pueblos.

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The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule: A History of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, 1519-1810.

Here is the complete history of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, one of the two most important religious groups in the Spanish empire in America, from the Conquest to Independence in the early nineteenth century. Based upon ten years of research, this study focuses on the effect if Spanish institutions on Indian life at the local level.
Comments: (3)
Anasius
The "Black Legend" of the Spanish conquest and occupation of the New World has long shaded perceptions of European colonization in Latin America. Charles Gibson, in his ground-breaking study closely considers the social, political and economic effects of Spanish rule on the indigenous population. It is an exhaustive and detailed study that altered perceptions of this period of Latin American history. Originally published in 1964, _The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule_ has aged well, although more recent scholarship has been conducted.

Of particular interest to me was Gibson's examination of Spanish missionary activity. Gibson points out that inital efforts at conversion were a failure - the Aztecs were willing to embrace the rituals of Christianity but struggled with the theological concepts behind them, in essence retaining their polytheistic views. This, in effect was a microcosm of the larger changes the Spanish brought with them: Aztec institutions and structures were swept away and replaced with Spanish structures, but these changes were initially superficial, the process of "Hispanicization" taking generations.

The overlay of Spanish administration on existing pre-Columbian political organization was also fascinating, given the nature and objectives of the conquest. Gibson points out that in the 150 years following the arrival of the Spanish was the deterioration of a native empire and the fragmentation of a civilization. In other words, the imperial structure of the Aztecs was swept away, but there followed a synthesis of Spanish and indigenous civilizations. Naturally when two complex societies itertwine there will be political, economic and social winners and losers - what Gibson shows (and what was suprizing to me) was the relative lack of Spanish impact on the Aztecs at the social level.

The history here is richly detailed and provides an abundance of data (primarily from tax records), but there is a glaring absence of personal anecdotes - the personal stories that are illustrative of larger events that breathe life into history. This is to the book's detriment. I was also disappointed, given the level of scholarship demonstrated here, that greater attention wasn't paid to the epidemics that followed the arrival of the Europeans. When it is discsused, it is largely in an economic context rather than a sociological or epidemiological context.

While a bit dated, _The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule_ is a fascinating and detailed account of the first 150 years of Spanish rule in Mexico. The general reader will probably waant to pick and choose through the text such is its depth, but it remains an outstanding history.
Doomredeemer
A classic study.
Vudojar
Aztecs Under Spanish Rule is an in-depth study of the evolution of the historical relationship between the Native Mexicans and the Spaniards in Colonial Latin America. The story begins with the cultural differences between the two groups after the Spaniard's conquering effort over the Aztecs, 1519-1521. The social-cultural alterations and reorganizations that took place during the process of their co-existence within the Mexican mesa central from that point until Mexico's bid for independence, in 1821, are the general themes within the topics of each chapter. Gibson begins with a brief historical sketch of the landscape and human occupation of the Valley of Mexico, and each following chapter covering such historical topics as settlement patterns, land use, politics, religion and social structures literally has the potential of being its own disquisition. The author unleashes a flood of data, references and Indian names that cascade over the pages; unless the reader is in firm command of the Mexican Indian terminology, the glossary will become a welcomed reference bookmark. The overall effect of subjugation by the Imperial Spanish over the once Imperial Aztecs is visible in nearly all facets of life. This transformed society becomes the foundation for modern-day Mexico City and the greater Mexican society. The typical form of the chapters is a chronologically based essay. Beginning at or close to the point conquest, and traversing through the next three centuries, stopping at important junctions, at which point Gibson provides connecting vignettes that illuminate this region and inhabitant's path of history. Thus the scholarly Aztecs Under Spanish Rule is not overwhelming and is a quite digestible text that lay persons with interest in Mexican or Latin American history will find most agreeable. Even though the structuring of the chapters and their content is consistent and readable, Gibson's work is essentially a historical text that suffers from a lack of narration. The people and their situations do not come alive; they are presented in a flat, matter of fact manner, negating Aztecs Under Spanish Rule's potential as a page-turner. The most commendable list of primary sources permits the author to introduce an enviable texture, however, the fine combing does not occur, which would have produced a more human connected story. It is hard to imagine that the plethora of letters in the bibliography did not allow for the inclusion of longer, more personable and illuminating quotes. The very strength of each chapter as its own tractate, in this reviewer's opinion, becomes the book's undoing. At the conclusion of each topical chapter, we are back in the starting gate once again. That is not to say that Gibson's work is anything less than exemplary, rather simply that its topical structure somewhat takes away from author's ability to maintain the reader's imagination and focus as the story begins, unfolds, begins then unfolds, and begins and unfolds yet again and again. Once transported back in time, a connection is made, and an anticipation of the unfolding of the story builds. Severing this association repeatedly disconnects the reader from the flow of history. This could however be a matter of personal taste. Gibson states in his preface that he spent nearly twelve and one-half years researching and assembling this extraordinary piece of historical scholarship. His extensive appendixes, notes and bibliography speak well of his not brief dedication in compiling this work. For those aroused by the subject and feel the need to go deeper, this is a great starting point. The selection of maps and plates further illuminate this recommended history of Mexico. Try to remeber as well, that this work really stirred the waters when it came out, portraying the Spanish Conquest as, well, what a conquest is really all about.