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eBook Constituting Empire: New York and the Transformation of Constitutionalism in the Atlantic World, 1664-1830 (Studies in Legal History) download

by Daniel J. Hulsebosch

eBook Constituting Empire: New York and the Transformation of Constitutionalism in the Atlantic World, 1664-1830 (Studies in Legal History) download ISBN: 0807859206
Author: Daniel J. Hulsebosch
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (September 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 496
ePub: 1327 kb
Fb2: 1804 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw docx doc mobi
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Daniel J. Hulsebosch complicates this viewpoint by arguing that American .

Daniel J. Hulsebosch complicates this viewpoint by arguing that American ideas of constitutions were based on British ones and that, in New York, those ideas evolved over the long eighteenth century as New York moved from the periphery of the British Atlantic empire to the center of a new continental empire. The American Society for Legal History was founded in 1956 to foster interdisciplinary scholarship and teaching in the broad field of legal history.

By Daniel J. Hulsebosch. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005. By Daniel J.

Constituting Empire book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Constituting Empire: New York and the Transformation of Constitutionalism in the Atlantic World, 1664-1830 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Home Browse Books Book details, Constituting Empire: New York and .

Home Browse Books Book details, Constituting Empire: New York and the. In his paradigm-shifting analysis, Hulsebosch captures the essential paradox at the heart of American constitutional history: the Revolution, which brought political independence and substituted the people for the British crown as the source of legitimate authority, also led to the establishment of a newly powerful constitution and a new postcolonial genre of constitutional law that would have been the envy of the. British imperial agents who had struggled to govern the colonies before the Revolution. Series: Studies in Legal History. Explains how colonists and administrators reconfigured British legal sources to suit their needs in an expanding empire. This story captures the essential paradox at the heart of American constitutional history: the Revolution, which brought political independence and substituted the people for the British crown.

Transformation of Constitutionalism in the Atlantic World, 1664-1830. Daniel J. Hulsebosch Daniel J. Hulsebosch complicates this viewpoint by arguing that American ideas of constitutions were based on British ones and that, in New York.

Constituting Empire: New York and the Transformation of Constitutionalism in the Atlantic World, 1664-1830. Univ of North Carolina Press, 2006 M05 18 - 496 pages. Hulsebosch explains how colonists and administrators reconfigured British legal sources to suit their needs in an expanding empire.

Studies in Legal History. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2005. Recommend this journal. x + 494 pp. ISBN: 0-8078-2955-2 (hb. University of New Hampshire. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 22 April 2010. Hulsebosch is professor of law and history at New York University School of Law. Библиографические данные.

Constituting Empire: New York and the Transformation of Constitutionalism in the .

According to the traditional understanding of American constitutional law, the Revolution produced a new conception of the constitution as a set of restrictions on the power of the state rather than a mere description of governmental roles. Daniel J. Hulsebosch complicates this viewpoint by arguing that American ideas of constitutions were based on British ones and that, in New York, those ideas evolved over the long eighteenth century as New York moved from the periphery of the British Atlantic empire to the center of a new continental empire. Hulsebosch explains how colonists and administrators reconfigured British legal sources to suit their needs in an expanding empire. In this story, familiar characters such as Alexander Hamilton and James Kent appear in a new light as among the nation's most important framers, and forgotten loyalists such as Superintendent of Indian Affairs Sir William Johnson and lawyer William Smith Jr. are rightly returned to places of prominence.In his paradigm-shifting analysis, Hulsebosch captures the essential paradox at the heart of American constitutional history: the Revolution, which brought political independence and substituted the people for the British crown as the source of legitimate authority, also led to the establishment of a newly powerful constitution and a new postcolonial genre of constitutional law that would have been the envy of the British imperial agents who had struggled to govern the colonies before the Revolution.In his paradigm-shifting analysis, Daniel J. Hulsebosch captures the essential paradox at the heart of American constitutional history: the Revolution, which brought political independence and substituted the people for the British crown as the source of legitimate authority, also led to the establishment of newly powerful constitutions and a new postcolonial genre of constitutional law that would have been the envy of the British imperial agents who had struggled to govern the colonies before the Revolution.The revolutionary transformation did not, therefore, consist of a new conception of the constitution as a set of restrictions on the power of the state, Hulsebosch argues. Instead, it entailed a search for new ways of framing, empowering, and limiting official power. Drawing on new archival sources as well as canonical documents such as The Federalist Papers, Hulsebosch demonstrates that these constitutional experiments were informed by imperial experience and continued well into the nineteenth century, as New York moved from the periphery of the British Atlantic empire to the center of a new continental empire.-->