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eBook Captives and Voyagers: Black Migrants Across the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic World (Antislavery, Abolition, and the Atlantic World) download

by Alexander X. Byrd

eBook Captives and Voyagers: Black Migrants Across the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic World (Antislavery, Abolition, and the Atlantic World) download ISBN: 0807137103
Author: Alexander X. Byrd
Publisher: LSU Press; Reprint edition (September 1, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 360
ePub: 1853 kb
Fb2: 1753 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mobi azw rtf mbr
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Once in Jamaica, Byrd finds black migrants confronting a seasoning process marked by forms of brutality and degradation .

Once in Jamaica, Byrd finds black migrants confronting a seasoning process marked by forms of brutality and degradation akin to those experienced during the middle passage. In The Overthrow of Colonial Slavery (New York: Verso, 1988) and The Making of New World Slavery: From the Baroque to the Modern, 1492–1800 (London: Verso, 1997) Blackburn documented the creation and abolition of New World slavery, establishing himself as a premier scholar of slavery as a transatlantic institution. American Crucible expands upon themes covered in these two praiseworthy books, while enhancing and refining Blackburn’s analysis and extending his temporal scope to about 1900.

Free Africans sailed back across the Atlantic to Africa as well. Alexander Byrd focuses first on the British slave trade from the Bight of Biafra to Jamaica. At least he does not call the British Atlantic the Black Atlantic, but to state that Jamaica was the hemisphere’s most extensive slave society (63) strains credibility.

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Jamestown and Plymouth serve as iconic images of British migration to the New World. Captives and Voyagers, a compelling study from Alexander X. Byrd, traces the departures, voyages, and landings of enslaved and free blacks who left their homelands in the eighteenth century for British colonies and examines how displacement and resettlement shaped migrant society and, in turn, Britain's Atlantic empire.

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Antislavery, Abolition, and the Atlantic World. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2008. To focus on the process of migration, Alexander X. Byrd compares two migratory cycles of the British Atlantic during the eighteenth century. These migrations center on the voyages of three ships transporting "black poor" settlers from London for resettlement in Sierra Leone-as compared with the voyages of over twice as many slave ships, especially from Bonny and New Calabar, along with the aftermath of their arrival in Jamaica (p. 1). The first four chapters trace the process of enslavement in the Biafran. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. -332) and index. From slaves to free subjects in British North America Black society and the limits of British freedom The effects of exodus : Afro-maritime society in motion Arriving in Sierra Leone : catastrophe and its aftermaths Conclusion: Migration and black society in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world.

Captives and Voyagers, a compelling study from Alexander X. Byrd, traces the departures, voyages, and landings of enslaved and free blacks who left their homelands in the eighteenth century for British colonies and examines how displacement and resettlement shaped migrant society. Captives and Voyagers. Antislavery, Abolition, and the Atlantic World (Hardcover). Louisiana State University Press, LSU Press.

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: In this latest addition to LSU Press's Antislavery, Abolition, and the Atlantic World. Roderick A. McDonald.

Jamestown and Plymouth serve as iconic images of British migration to the New World. A century later, however, when British migration was at its peak, the vast majority of men, women, and children crisscrossing the Atlantic on English ships were of African, not English, descent. Captives and Voyagers, a compelling study from Alexander X. Byrd, traces the departures, voyages, and landings of enslaved and free blacks who left their homelands in the eighteenth century for British colonies and examines how displacement and resettlement shaped migrant society and, in turn, Britain's Atlantic empire. Captives and Voyagers breaks away from the conventional image of transatlantic migration and illustrates how black men and women, enslaved and free, came to populate the edges of an Anglo-Atlantic world. Whether as settlers in Sierra Leone or as slaves in Jamaica, these migrants brought a deep and affecting experience of being in motion to their new homelands, and as they became firmly ensconced in the particulars of their new local circumstances they both shaped and were themselves molded by the demands of the British Atlantic world, of which they were an essential part.Byrd focuses on the two largest and most significant streams of black dislocation: the forced immigration of Africans from the Biafran interior of present-day southeastern Nigeria to Jamaica as part of the British slave trade and the emigration of free blacks from Great Britain and British North America to Sierra Leone in West Africa. By paying particular attention to the social and cultural effects of transatlantic migration on the groups themselves and focusing as well on their place in the British Empire, Byrd illuminates the meaning and experience of slavery and liberty for people whose journeys were similarly beset by extreme violence and catastrophe. By following the movement of this representative population, Captives and Voyagers provides a vitally important view of the British colonial world -- its intersection with the African diaspora.

Captives and Voyagers traces the departures, voyages, and landings of enslaved and free blacks who left their homelands in the eighteenth century for British colonies and examines how displacement and resettlement shaped migrant society and, in turn, Britain's Atlantic empire. Alexander X. Byrd focuses on the two largest and most significant streams of black dislocation: the forced migration of Africans from the Biafran interior of present-day southeastern Nigeria to Jamaica as part of the British slave trade and the journeys of free blacks from Great Britain and British North America to Sierra Leone in West Africa. By paying particular attention to the social and cultural effects of transatlantic migration on the groups themselves and focusing as well on their place in the British Empire, Byrd illuminates the meaning and experience of slavery and liberty for people whose movements were similarly beset by extreme violence and catastrophe.

Comments: (2)
nailer
Super fast shipping from seller, book was in excellent condition! However, the book was very straining to read. Very heavy and could not keep my interest. Would not have even finished if it were not for my upper division history class.
Zavevidi
good