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eBook Archaeology of Louisiana: A Novel download

by Mark A. Rees

eBook Archaeology of Louisiana: A Novel download ISBN: 0807137057
Author: Mark A. Rees
Publisher: LSU Press; 1 edition (November 30, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 488
ePub: 1239 kb
Fb2: 1522 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr lit lrf doc
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Archaeology of Louisiana book.

Archaeology of Louisiana book.

Archaeology of Louisiana provides a groundbreaking and up-to-date overview of archaeology in the Bayou State, including a thorough analysis of the cultures, communities, and people of Louisiana from the Native Americans of 13,000 years ago to the modern historical archaeology o. .

Archaeology of Louisiana provides a groundbreaking and up-to-date overview of archaeology in the Bayou State, including a thorough analysis of the cultures, communities, and people of Louisiana from the Native Americans of 13,000 years ago to the modern historical archaeology of New Orleans

Plaquemine, Louisiana, about 10 miles south of Baton Rouge on the banks of the Mississippi River, seems an unassuming southern . It is the first major book to specifically address the archaeology of Plaquemine societies.

Plaquemine, Louisiana, about 10 miles south of Baton Rouge on the banks of the Mississippi River, seems an unassuming southern community for which to designate an entire culture.

Can you tell us a bit about the field? Post processual archaeology is very much to do with the application of.The emergence of World Archaeology is something that happened in parallel, quite suddenly and has roots in a lot of things we’ve been talking about

Can you tell us a bit about the field? Post processual archaeology is very much to do with the application of postmodernism to archaeological thought and the study of the past. The emergence of World Archaeology is something that happened in parallel, quite suddenly and has roots in a lot of things we’ve been talking about. It’s actually a group of theories – in part a reaction to traditional colonial archaeology, an attempt to de-colonialise archaeology and produce a post-colonial approach to the past.

In The Archaeology of Louisiana, Mark Rees, ed. Louisiana University Press. Colonial and Antebellum New Orleans, with Shannon Lee Dawdy. In The Archaeology of Louisiana, Mark Rees, ed. Christopher Matthews.

Plaquemine Archaeology. By Mark A. Rees, Patrick C. Livingood. Plaquemine, Louisiana, about 10 miles south of Baton Rouge on the banks of the Mississippi River, seems an unassuming southern community for which to designate an entire culture. Plaquemine Archaeology.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Mark Rees books online. Archaeology of Louisiana. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 30 of 34 results. Professor of Anthropology Ian W Brown.

This book tells us how we learned what we now know about the Southeast's unwritten past. Books related to Histories of Southeastern Archaeology. Of obvious interest to professionals and students of the field, this volume will also be sought after by historians, political scientists, amateurs, and anyone interested in the South. -Southeastern Archaeology. The Indian Massacres and War of 1862, Illustrated.

The term Great American Novel (GAN) refers to a canonical novel that is thought to have captured the spirit of American life. These novels are generally written by Americans and deal in some way with the question of America's national character. The Great American Novel is sometimes considered America's equivalent of the national epic. There is no consensus on which novel or novels deserve to be called the Great American Novel

Archaeology of Louisiana provides a groundbreaking and up-to-date overview of archaeology in the Bayou State, including a thorough analysis of the cultures, communities, and people of Louisiana from the Native Americans of 13,000 years ago to the modern historical archaeology of New Orleans. With eighteen chapters and twenty-seven distinguished contributors, Archaeology of Louisiana brings together the studies of some of the most respected archaeologists currently working in the state, collecting in a single volume a range of methods and theories to offer a comprehensive understanding of the latest archaeological findings.In the past two decades alone, much new data has transformed our knowledge of Louisiana's history. This collection, accordingly, presents fresh perspectives based on current information, such as the discovery that Native Americans in Louisiana constructed some of the earliest-known monumental architecture in the world -- extensive earthen mounds -- during the Middle Archaic period (6000--2000 B.C.) Other contributors consider a variety of subjects, such as the development of complex societies without agriculture, underwater archaeology, the partnering of archaeologists with the Caddo Nation and descendant communities, and recent research in historical archaeology and cultural resource management that promises to transform our current appreciation of colonial Spanish, French, Creole, and African American experiences in the Lower Mississippi Valley.Accessible and engaging, Archaeology of Louisiana provides a complete and current archaeological reference to the state's unique heritage and history.

Comments: (4)
Gigafish
This was a required textbook for a Southeastern archaeology class I took. This was a Sr level class and I'm close to graduating, so I've had a few (12+) archaeology classes and have read my fair share of books and articles over the years. This was not one of the better.
This book is a rough overview of the archeological work and topics that have been touched on in the state of Louisiana from the 19th century until the volume was published. The time span covered runs from the earliest signs of Native American activity withing the state through to the end of the Antibellum period. Each chapter is written by different archaeologists, with some repeat among authors from chapter to chapter. This being the case, the writing styles shift from chapter to chapter and some read as if they are meant to be digested by the general public, while others are more scholarly in nature. It being an overview somewhat limits it's scope and depth of coverage, which is to be expected, however, even given that, it falls a bit short in places.

For the most part the prehistoric chapters are good. Paleo and Early Archaic evidence can be scarce in Louisiana due to the massive number of waterways and the way they have shifted over the years, but the authors do what they can with the material they have. The real problems arise when the book reaches the historical period and delves into Spanish, French and early American sites. The scope of the book was simply too limited to allow solid overviews of some enteraction spheres. The Spanish and the French are separated into respective chapters, while contact between the groups is touched on, it's not to the dept that's really needed. The African American Archaeology chapter is bear laughable, it's a scant 14 pages and barely touches on the impact that the slaves and their descendants had on the culture in Louisiana. The pre Civil War chapters focus almost entirely on New Orleans giving no real idea of life and culture outside of a major port city where identity could become easily skewed or changed by constant contact with outsiders.
The final chapter is a token attempt to touch on underwater archaeology. It is very difficult to understand without having some previous experience with underwater arch. It is, by far, the worst chapter in the book. The writing is simply to non explanatory, and the mature of the chapter simply makes no sense given the previous chapters in the book. Chronologically it's all over the place and really gives no worthwhile information.

All in all, if you HAVE to read it, then do so. If it's not required and you're just looking for a book giving insight into Louisiana history and archaeology, then there are likely better books out there.
Groll
Very interesting read, I've learned a lot reading this book
Elastic Skunk
A must have for LMV/Caddo archaeology
Levaq
Archaeology of Louisiana is highly descriptive and informative. It is a must have for anyone interested in archaeology and/or Native American history in the southern United States.